Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

Andrew Page

Special to The News
ATHENS–A 36-year-old suspected drug dealer riding his bicycle on the wrong side of the road was arrested this weekend in a subdivision just south of Chandler.
Andrew Allen Page was stopped by Deputy Jacob Sumrall Saturday for traveling southbound on Sunrise Dive in the Sunrise Shores subdivision. He was found to be in possession of a substantial amount of suspected methamphetamine and several clear plastic bags commonly used is the distribution of the illegal drug.
“Our deputies are constantly on the look out for anything out of the ordinary,” Sheriff Botie Hillhouse said. “This suspect was going the wrong way, acting nervous and had trouble communicating with the deputy.”
Page was carrying more than 5 grams of the contraband.
“This is part of our concerted campaign against drugs in Henderson County,” Hillhouse said. “Hopefully, this arrest takes us to an even bigger supplier in the criminal drug chain that we are systematically breaking here.”
Page was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. He is currently being held on a $30,000 bail.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many people find it impossible to think about summer without conjuring visions of spending endless hours outdoors from morning until evening, whether beachside, on the open water or even floating in a backyard pool.
Although a certain measure of sun exposure is required for some natural functions of the body, it’s well documented that too much time in the sun can be hazardous to one’s health. That’s why summer frolickers need to exercise considerable caution each time they step outside.
Taking sunburn for granted can be a big mistake. Many people wouldn’t risk burns from a hot stove or open fire, but they won’t think twice about being unprotected under the very hot rays of the sun.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than one-third of adults and nearly 70 percent of children admit to suffering from sunburn within the past year. Depending on the intensity of the sun and the amount of time spent outside, sunburn can be a first or second-degree burn. In first-degree burns, damage affects the topmost layer of skin. However, sunburn can even affect deeper layers and cause blistering in addition to redness and pain.
Sunburn also can cause some irreparable damage that goes unseen. According to WebMD, ultraviolet light from the sun can alter DNA, prematurely aging skin or even contributing to skin cancers.
It can take years before symptoms become noticeable. Therefore, it is best for people of all ages to exercise caution when spending time in the sun.
Sunburn is one of the most easily prevented summertime ailments. It’s also important to note that sunburns are not just limited to the hot weather or when it is sunny outside. Ultraviolet damage can occur at any time of the year, and also from artificial UV sources, such as tanning beds. Preventing sunburn is simple.
The Mayo Clinic says the sun’s rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so schedule outdoor activities for other times of day. Otherwise, limit exposure to the sun and take frequent breaks in the shade.
Wear protective clothing that covers the arms and legs. Some outdoor gear is designed to offer sun protection. Tightly woven fabrics tend to help the most.
Apply and reapply sunscreen. Look for products that offer an SPF of 15 or greater. The American Academy of Dermatology actually recommends an SPF of 30 or greater.
Make sure the product is broad-spectrum, meaning it protects against UVA and UVB rays.
Apply sunscreen thoroughly, paying attention to the tops of feet, hands and other places that tend to go untreated. Reapply every two hours or more frequently, if necessary.
Base tans do not protect the skin. Research does not support the habit of getting a tan to prevent subsequent sunburn.
Protect the face and eyes by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and highly rated UV protection sunglasses.
The Skin Cancer Foundation says a person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns.
Use protection, stay hydrated and play it smart to enjoy summer to the fullest.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–The Athens Hornets and Lady Hornets had nine total athletes named to the Class 4A Academic All-State team.
Lady Hornet softball players Jennifer Bradford, Alicia Grogan, Kelli Gartman and Sam Smith were selected to the Academic All-State softball team by the Texas High School Girls Coaches Association. Athens Hornet graduate Meagan Withers was named to the Academic All-State tennis team by the same association.
To be nominated to the team, athletes must be graduating seniors, have an overall grade point average of 94 or above for grades 9-11, must be a varsity participant or support staff member in good standing and be of good moral character.
The Athens Hornet baseball team had four players named to the Academic All-State baseball team by the Texas High School Coaches Association, with senior Cameron Woodard being selected to the Elite team.
Kolemann Dooley and Casey Pitchford were named to the first team as well, with Jacob Ickes being named to the second team.
To be nominated for academic All-State, a student must be an athlete, student trainer or manager in good standing with the team, of good moral character, a senior and have an overall grade point average of 92 or above.
To make the Elite team, a player must have near perfect scores in all categories.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

City of Malakoff Mayor Delois Pagitt (right) takes the oath of office.

City of Malakoff Mayor Delois Pagitt (right) takes the oath of office.


By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff City Council met June 12 to deal with the results of the May 6 general election. The election left the City Council with no changes as Jeanette King and Tim Trimble were sworn in as council members and Mayor Delois Pagitt was once again sworn in as mayor. Tim Trimble was also re-elected as Mayor Pro-Tem by his fellow council members. The time and date of regular council meetings also remains unchanged.
Auditor Frank Steele of Anderson, Marx & Bohl and P.C. regarding the city’s audit report for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2016. The auditor stated the city has $1,060,000 in cash and certificates of deposit and commended the council for their fiscal responsibility as they had spent approximately $100,000 less than budgeted.
The council adopted a resolution authorizing the continued participation with the ATMOS Cities Steering Committee to fund regulatory and activities related to ATMOS Energy Corporation.
The council convened into executive session before item 6 on the agenda which was to hear reports and updates from City of Malakoff Fire Chief Eddie Muehlstein requesting a maintenance fund, permission to destroy inventory or removal of property, permission to hold an open house on June 24 and recommendation of appointments of Officers and personnel. Chief Muehlstein was invited into the executive session.
When the council reconvened back into the regular session, permision was granted to donate some items including a used television. No action was taken on the other items.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

Jim White Obit

Lucius James White was born Sept. 8, 1929 at Baptist Hospital in Houston to Lucius Jefferson White and Hortense Bell White. He passed away June 15, 2017, in San Antonio.
Jim, as he was known to everyone, grew up moving around Texas oil towns as his father worked for Magnolia Pipeline Company. He worked on the pipelines himself as a young person.
He met Margaret Ann Fowler, at the First Baptist Church in Corsicana and they married October 10, 1953.
He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of North Texas and taught school in Beaumont before entering the Air Force during the Korean Conflict.
After leaving the Air Force, Jim worked for Mobil Oil Company in Dallas. He then attended Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, where he received a Master’s in Religious Education. He earned a Doctorate in Education from the University of North Texas.
He spent his life serving God, sharing the Gospel message with everyone he met, ministering to those in hospitals and prisons, holding Bible studies in his home with his wife, feeding those who were hungry and providing educational resources, clothing and other necessities to those in need.
He served as a minister of Christ’s church at Town East Baptist Church in Mesquite, the Hill Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga., Woodstock Park Baptist Church in Jacksonville, Fla., Sharpstown Baptist Church in Houston and the Anchor in Surfside Beach.
He helped start Northwest Academy, Bellaire Christian Academy and Rosehill Christian School, all in the Houston area and served as the first headmaster of each. He was also the headmaster for Second Baptist School in Houston, Dallas Christian Academy and Brazoria Christian Academy. He was always known very affectionately as “Dr. White.”
After retiring from paid work, he spent 25 years volunteering with Christian groups and traveling. He spent time working with the Canadian Baptist Seminary and working with mission groups in Africa and China, teaching and preaching. He served as interim pastor at churches in towns around Athens and Malakoff. He loved to teach the Bible, holding Bible studies at his home and in church.
His faith in God and devotion to prayer were defining characteristics of his life. He always believed that God supplied all of his needs and taught his children as well as those in his Christian schools and Bible studies, that loving God was the most important thing of all.
He was preceded in death by his beloved wife Ann just short of their 60th wedding anniversary.
He is survived by his children, Lyn Farrell and husband Brian, Cindy McFarland and husband, Dr. Michael McFarland, Jeff White and wife, Leslie.
He is also survived by ten grandchildren Margaret Farrell Lamar, Katherine Farrell Foote, David Farrell, John Farrell, Ethan Farrell, Amanda McFarland Fitzhugh, Luke White, Thomas White, James White and Elizabeth White. He is survived by five great-grandchildren.
A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. at Huckabee-Tomlinson Funeral Home in Malakoff on Saturday, June 24, 2017. Visitation will be held at the funeral home on Friday, June 23, 2017 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations should be sent to Voice of the Martyrs.

Jun

15

Posted by : admin | On : June 15, 2017

AthensFB1CMYK

The News Staff Reports
LONGVIEW–Athens Hornet graduate Maalik Hall helped his Blue team to a 17-7 victory over the Red team at the Chic-fil-A FCA Heart of a Champion All-Star game Saturday, June 10 at Longview’s Lobo Stadium. The game was part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ All-Star Weekend, which also included All-Star baseball and softball games.
Hall, a running back and linebacker in his career at Athens, started at outside linebacker for the Blue team and finished the game with five tackles, as well as playing on the punt team and the kickoff return team. Hall was nominated for the honor by Athens High School Athletic Director/Head Football Coach Paul Essary.
Hall will be continuing his education and football career in the fall as he will be playing for Southeastern Oklahoma State University.
Mabank’s Noel Rojo and Eustace’s Mikey Marshall were also selected as members of the Blue team. Marshall started on the offensive line while Rojo came off the bench to play on the offensive line as well.
Rojo will take his talents to the next level and will play for Bethany College in the fall. Marshall is headed to Missouri Valley.
The vision of the FCA is to see the world impacted for Jesus Christ through the influence of coaches and athletes.

Jun

15

Posted by : admin | On : June 15, 2017

The News Staff Reports
TYLER–Athens Lady Hornet Sam Smith finished her standout high school career by playing in the Courtney Construction Fellowship of Christian Athletes Softball All-Star game Friday, June 9.
Smith helped lead her Red team to a 10-3 victory over the Blue team at Suddenlink Field on the campus of UT-Tyler. Smith had two hits- a single and an RBI double- and a walk to help the Red team to victory.

Jun

15

Posted by : admin | On : June 15, 2017

Caption for photo: Blas Caroprese, physicist; Davana Eaton, clinic manager; Dr. Bruce Ellerin, radiation oncologist; Brandi Jones, RN; Irene Sanchez, radiation therapist and Pushkar Desai, physicist, are ready to start treating patients with the new linear accelerator unveiled this week at the ETMC Cancer Institute in Athens.

Caption for photo:
Blas Caroprese, physicist; Davana Eaton, clinic manager; Dr. Bruce Ellerin, radiation oncologist; Brandi Jones, RN; Irene Sanchez, radiation therapist and Pushkar Desai, physicist, are ready to start treating patients with the new linear accelerator unveiled this week at the ETMC Cancer Institute in Athens.


Special to The News
ATHENS–The East Texas Medical Center (ETMC) Cancer Institute in Athens unveiled new state-of-the-art radiation technology, the Elekta Infinity linear accelerator, to treat cancer patients.
“One benefit of this new accelerator is shorter treatment times,” said Board-certified Radiation Oncologist Dr. Bruce Ellerin. “Shorter treatment times improve patient comfort, but also reduce inaccuracies resulting from patient movement during treatment delivery. A conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) takes around 19 minutes, but with the Elekta treatment time ranges from two to five minutes.”
The Elekta Infinity also delivers precision dose conformance with ultra-low doses of radiation making it safer for the patient. In addition, the Elekta gives more flexibility to control the treatment parameters, while the beam is on and rotating, to optimize the dose around a tumor and better spare healthy issue.
“The new accelerator is better for patient positioning, which is important where high precision is necessary for certain procedures,” said Ellerin. “The machine is capable of producing three different high energy X-ray beams. This helps with planning and calculation for each patient’s procedure to correctly deliver the right amount of treatment.”
The Elekta Infinity accelerator is capable of advanced treatment, such as rotational IMRT and some stereotactic body radiation therapy, which previously were not available in Athens.
ETMC began offering cancer services in Tyler in 1982, and acquired what became the ETMC Cancer Institute in Athens in 2009. The 9,600-square-foot facility employs a full clinical staff.
Radiation therapy provides techniques for destroying abnormal cells. In many instances, radiation therapy is the single best method for the treatment and cure of cancer. Radiation therapy may also be combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy to cure or control the disease. In other cases, radiation therapy can be used as a supportive measure to reduce discomfort, bleeding or pain.
More than 21,000 cancer patients have been treated at the ETMC Cancer Institute by an expert team of health specialists, including physicists, dosimetrists, radiation therapists, nurses and other support personnel. The team is led by the radiation oncologist, a physician who specializes in the treatment of cancer with radiation. This specialist decides what type of radiation therapy is best, plans the treatments and carefully monitors each patient.

Jun

15

Posted by : admin | On : June 15, 2017

worked up photos mugshots Clifford Miller

worked up photos
mugshots
Clifford Miller


The News Staff Reports
ATHENS—Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse reports five men arrested for meth possession last week. Although unrelated, Hillhouse says the ambitious attack on the illegal drug trade is producing results.
“We are breaking the links of the drug chain here,” he said. “Often, we get the drug users, which leads us to the dealers and to the suppliers.”
Clifford Keith Miller, 55, was arrested at a residence outside Athens on U.S. 175 West with a substantial amount of meth, along with drug paraphernalia and marijuana.
His case began with the execution of a search warrant early June 7 that turned up the contraband at the scene during an unrelated investigation. Narcotics investigators were called in to assist. Miller faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.
During that Wednesday, two men were taken in from a traffic stop at the intersection of Farm-to-Market Road 1615 and County Road 4511. A search of the vehicle found that both men were in possession of suspected methamphetamines. The driver, Russell Allen Stogner, 27, was also without a valid driver’s license, and received an additional charge. His passenger was Lonnie Lee Fender, 32. The drug possession charge for both men carries a penalty of up to two years in jail and a $10,000 fine.
A fugitive was located at a storage complex in Malakoff that same day. Phillip Maddox was wanted on an outstanding felony theft warrant and felony firearm possession charge. Deric Young was with Maddox at the time and he was found to have a small amount of a controlled substance and marijuana, along with outstanding arrest warrants out of Seven Points.
Early Thursday, June 8, a traffic stop on CR 4528 found Jeffrey Ryan Anding, 29, with suspected meth. He could be convicted of a state jail felony as well.
“A year ago when I took office, I made it clear we would not tolerate drugs in any amount by anyone in this county,” Hillhouse said. ‘From the commanders to the investigators to the deputies on patrol day and night, we are cracking down on both dealers and users of this poison,” he said. “Henderson County is becoming known as the place where drugs are very unwelcome.”

Jun

08

Posted by : admin | On : June 8, 2017

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Henderson County taxpayers are still paying for the 2007 crimes of Randall Mays after Commissioners approved payment of his capital murder case June 6.
Only Precinct 4 Commissioner Ken Geeslin opposed the payment, which totaled $21,514.47. This time the expense will go toward a mental evaluation for Mays, who was convicted in May of 2008 for killing Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Deputies Paul Habelt and Tony Ogburn.
Geeslin said he is upset the country is still paying for Mays’ crimes and wonders why the county tried to convict him of a capital offense.
Mays was sentenced to death for his crimes and scheduled for execution in March 2015, but the court of appeals delayed the process claiming Mays might not be competent to receive the death penalty. Henderson County picks up the resulting bills for the defense because it is a capital case.
Commissioners also approved the Keep Athens Beautiful and Light Up Athens organizations to decorate the Henderson County Courthouse and lawn this winter.
Dressing up the courthouse with festive lights and decorations is a tradition in Athens, but Commissioners are compelled to go through with the vote each year anyway due to a premise use policy put in place five years ago. According the Henderson County Judge Richard Sanders, the property isn’t a public forum, but individuals or private groups can be contracted to place displays on the property.
In other business, Commissioners approved:
• a payment of $19,000 from Sportsman’s Paradise Property Owners Association for materials to repave 1,200 feet of Mallard Street in Precinct 3;
• a right-of-way permit for the East Cedar Creek Fresh Water Supply Corporation;
• a request for a refund for overpayment of taxes from the Henderson County Tax Assessor/Collector in the amount of $8,586.45;
• payment of regular bills in the amount of $620,047.76.