Jan

07

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : January 7, 2015

IMG_9875

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff

ATHEN–Each Jan. 1, elected county officials across America are sworn in to begin their tenure. This year five such officials gathered at the Henderson County Courthouse Annex to make their vows of service, while simultaneously three more affirmed their oaths across the street at the County Court at Law Courtroom.

At the Courthouse Annex, Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Randy Daniel, JP 2 Judge Kevin Pollock, JP 3 Judge Tony Duncan, District Clerk Betty Herriage and County Commissioner Precinct 2 Wade McKinney took the honored vows to serve the residents of Henderson County. Former JP 3 Judge Sue Starnes swore in Duncan in a touching ceremony and exchange between friends, while Henderson County Judge Richard Sanders swore in Daniel, Pollock, Herriage and McKinney.

Former Athens Mayor Randy Daniel began his first full term as JP 1. He has already served in that capacity since 2013 after being appointed to an unexpired term. Likewise, former Seven Points Mayor Kevin Pollock and Tony Duncan began their first terms as justices. Betty Herriage made the move to District Clerk from the District Attorney’s office, where she served since 1996.

While the majority of officials took their first county-level oath during the brisk January morning, one official reaffirmed his oath for a fifth term in office. Precinct 2 Commissioner Wade McKinney was first elected commissioner in 1999 at 28 years of age. McKinney begins his 16th year as County Commissioner.
During a break from the seriousness of the swearing in cremony, McKinney lightened the mood by stating of all the County Judges he’s served with, Sanders was “My favorite.”

In another light-hearted moment, Starnes advice to incoming justices was a reminder that common sense is “not common.”

Across the street at the County Court at Law Courtroom, three other officials began their terms or renewed their oaths. Prescient 4 County Commissioner Ken Geeslin began his second term after successfully gaining reelection in November.

New County Court at Law Judge Matt Williams was sworn in to his first term after winning the Republican Primary last March. He was unopposed in the November general election.

Also, Mary Margaret Wright began her first official term as County Clerk after serving in that capacity by appointment since the retirement of Gwen Moffeit last March.

Former Court at Law Judge Matt Livingston administered the oaths.

Dec

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : December 30, 2014

Athens Fire-Shawna Smith-5-29

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff
HENDERSON COUNTY–Much has transpired in Henderson County in the past year. From the courthouse’s birthday, to school bomb threats, to tragic accidents, these are the stories that mattered to us the most at The News.

AMWA dispute resolved: Voters decided to keep the Athens Municipal Water Authority (AMWA) afloat on Election Day May 10 after 668 voters decided not to dissolve the authority, with 590 voters in favor. The decision came after the Athens City Council voted to dissolve the authority in January. AMWA scrambled to come up with enough signatures to push the decision to a vote decided by Athens residents.

Two Grand Jury Indictments: Two Athens residents were indicted by a Grand Jury in 2014. The first was Stacie Marie Parsons, 25, of Athens. Parsons confessed to killing her 4-year-old daughter July 21 after an argument with her common law husband the previous day. The other was Raheem Mark Miller, 19, of Athens. Raheem was charged with the June 8 shooting death of Malakoff resident Cedrick Collins, 23, whose death occurred during a robbery.

Bomb Threats: Athens had two bomb threat scares in about a two week time frame. The Henderson County Courthouse and all five Athens ISD schools were all evacuated on two separate dates. The courthouse threat was called in Oct. 23 and ISD threat came Nov. 5. No bombs were found and nobody was injured. Athens ISD is offering $1,000 to anyone with information that leads to the arrest of the person responsible for the threats on the schools.

New Athens Chamber President: After a long search, Mike Coston took over the job as the Athens Chamber of Commerce President last August. Coston replaced former president Mark Rathe, who moved back to Oklahoma to be closer to family.

Home of the Hamburger: Good Morning Texas filmed a live segment at the Athens city hall April 23 about Athens being the “Home of the hamburger.” According to many in Athens, the first hamburger in the world was taken from a small cafe in Athens all the way to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.
Walk-a-Mile: Men put on their high heels for a stroll around the Athens square for the second year in a row for the annual Walk a Mile in her Shoes March 31. The event raises domestic violence awareness and challenges men to put an end to abuse.

Agriculturist of the Year: Ken McGee, Jr., won the Joe B. Fulgham Agriculturist of the Year award May 20 after the annual Farm and Ranch Tour. McGee’s father, Kenneth, won the same award in 1993.
Fertilizer plant fire: Just two week after claiming the Agriculturist of the Year award, McGee watched his storage facility near the courthouse square in Athens burn to the ground days before the Old Fiddler Reunion. The aftermath was initially investigated as a crime scene, but no wrongdoing was found. The fire sparked a blaze of controversy and media attention because the facility stores ammonium nitrate, the same substance found in the massive explosion in West. When the smoke cleared, the Athens City Council approved an ordinance in December not allowing the flammable fertilizer in a zoning district within city limits.

Old Fiddlers: With the area just off the square still on lockdown after the fire, Dale Morris Jr., of Fort Worth, went on to take home the title of Grand Champion at the Old Fiddler’s Reunion on the Athens square May 31.

County Courthouse 100th birthday: Henderson County residents and officials celebrated the 100th birthday of the Henderson County Courthouse May 23. Notable activity included a time capsule placed in the ground, to be opened up in 2114.

Troubled officer: Former Malakoff police officer Ernest Fierro lost his Peace Officer license in a settlement that included nine years deferred adjudication and 40 hours community service on the charge of aggravated assault. Fierro was off duty December 2013 when he stopped and cuffed an elderly Iowa man who later died of cardiac arrest.

Tragedy on the tracks: 14-year-old Malakoff resident Harry Smith died June 26 when he ran in front of a passing train while trying to cross the railroad tracks. Smith was clipped in the leg crossing from his home, directly south of the tracks at the intersection of the Union Pacific Railroad and FM 3441 and died from his injuries. A memorial for Smith was erected at Jake’s Skate Park in Malakoff.

New leader at the Performing Arts Center: Longtime Henderson County Performing Arts Center Executive Director Dennis Gilmore retired after 25 years of service last February. Gilmore oversaw a tremendous period of growth from the one-time “Athens Little Theatre.” Gilmore traded a home in Athens for the sunny beaches of Palm Spring, Calif. Marcia Colbert took over the role in March. Colbert has served on the HCPAC board since 2003.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month: Shirts were on display on the courthouse lawn last October as part of The Clothesline Project. The Clothesline Project is a world wide awareness program that is facilitated locally through the East Texas Crisis Center representing domestic violence victims in Henderson County.

ISD Chief resigns after theft: Former Malakoff ISD Police Chief Todd Gilmore resigned after making bond from the Henderson County Jail last May. Gilmore confessed to stealing $1,500 in cash from Carroll-Lehr Funeral Home in Athens after being confronted with video surveillance footage.

Cop killer gets execution date: Convicted killer Randall Wayne Mays knows when his final day will be. Mays was convicted of killing Henderson County deputies Paul Habelt and Tony Ogburn, in May 17, 2007 when they responded to Mays’ Payne Springs ranch on a domestic call. Mays execution date is set for March 18, 2015.

TVCC sports:
Trinity Valley Community College saw muiltiple sports championships in 2014. The No. 1 ranked TVCC Lady Cardinals won their third consecutive national basketball championship March 22 at the Bicentennial Center in Salina, Kan. The match up was a repeat of the the 2012 title game. The Lady Cardinals now lay claim to eight titles, in 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2012, 2013 and 2014.
Not to be outdone, the Cardinals football team won the Texas championship by defeating the Coffeyville Community College Red Ravens 27-24 in the Heart of Texas Bowl. They finished the year with a perfect 12-0 record.

Tigers Roar:
The Malakoff Tigers football team fielded one of its best squads ever in 2014, maintaining a top-10 state ranking all season. The Tigers ended the season with a 9-2 record and a disapointing first round loss in the playoffs.

Dec

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : December 30, 2014

By David Webb
The News Correspondent
TRINIDAD–Retired Judge Ron Chapman and his wife, Sally, attended President Obama’s Christmas party at the White House Dec. 11, something they “never dreamed about being able to do” in their lifetimes.
“It was amazing,” Sally Chapman said after the couple returned home. “It was so beautiful and elegant. It was so exciting. It was just overwhelming.”
The vision of the lighted Christmas decorations on the first and second floor of the White House continues to thrill her, she said. “It was over the moon,” she said.
She said the best part of the experience though was the “reward” it represented for her husband, a longtime Democratic Party member.
“I was just so happy for him,” she said. “He loved it too.”
The trip came about as a result of a friend of Ron Chapman arranging the invitation. The friend asked the former judge if he would like to receive a Christmas card from President Obama, and he of course replied, “Yes.”
Then he received an e-mail asking for his Social Security number, address and other pertinent personal information in preparation for them attending the Christmas party. The couple, of course, wondered if it might be some sort of Internet scam, rather than a legitimate inquiry from the White House.
“Ron said, ‘Well, if it is a scam, it’s the best one I’ve ever seen,’” his wife said. A call to the judge’s friend revealed it was legitimate.
They received the invitation to the Christmas party about a week prior to their trip to Washington, D.C., and they made reservations to spend five days in the nation’s capital to see all of the historic sights.
Upon their arrival at the White House in the afternoon, it took about an hour for them to get through security. There were about 750 guests in attendance so the Chapmans only got a glimpse of the President and the First Lady, who descended to the second floor from a back staircase to greet the crowd.
The entertainment included the Marine Band, the St. Louis Carolers and an array of food on a 50-foot-long buffet table that offered everything imaginable to eat. President Obama and the First Lady danced during the party.
The Chapmans and other guests were free to roam throughout the first and second floors of the White House. Each room had a Christmas tree designed as a ball gown and a Secret Service guard who answered questions.
“I walked into one room where everything was blue so I said, ‘This must be the Blue Room,’” she said. The Secret Service agent joked back, “You are very observative.”
The rest of the stay in Washington, D.C. proved to be just as thrilling of an experience, she said. They toured the Smithsonian and visited as many national landmarks as they could.
Now, they are back at home, recovering from a bout of the flu, but the memories of their visit to the White House are comforting them through the aches and pains.

Chapman

Dec

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : December 30, 2014

The News
Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–Malakoff Independent School District (MISD) Board of Trustees approved the installation of new turf at Tiger Stadium, which may likely make them one of the preferred ball fields for game play in Henderson County.
The Matrix Synthetic Turf, consisting of two different grass blade sizes and two different colored fibers, will cost $889,083 with installation by Hellas Construction beginning in early May 2015.
The turf, according to the Matrix Turf website, brings together a combination of qualities for ideal light deflection, enhanced playability and system stability on an artificial turf that looks natural in appearance.
The project should take about 90 days to complete but should be ready before football season begins according to MISD Superintendent Randy Perry.
Perry says the school’s band has grown too large to be able to practice on their field and will now be able to do so at Tiger Stadium.
Also in the works for the stadium are restroom and concession stand improvements.
The two women’s restrooms on both sides of the football field will undergo renovations and building additional restrooms may be possible as well.
Malakoff is the sixth Henderson County school to install the Matrix Synthetic Turf at its facilities.

Tiger Stadium

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2014

Train accident2

By Russell Slaton
Monitor Correspondent

MALAKOFF–A 14-year-old Malakoff boy was killed Thursday afternoon when he ran in front of a passing train while trying to cross the tracks.

Kim Suttle, whose son Dakota, 16, witnessed the death, said Harry Smith, 14, was clipped in the leg crossing from his home, directly south of the railroad tracks at the intersection of the Union Pacific Railroad and FM 3441 (S. Terry Street, in downtown Malakoff.)

The witness was taken to Malakoff City Hall, his mother said, to be interviewed by law-enforcement officials. Officers on the scene included several state highway patrol officers, along with local law enforcement. Henderson County Precinct 5 Justice of the Peace Tommy Barnett also was at the scene, as was a law-enforcement chaplain.

Jill Davis of Malakoff said she was at the nearby Methodist Church and heard a train whistle about 3 p.m., then heard a loud crash. “I thought, oh my God, the train derailed,” Davis said. The victim sometimes worked at an antiques business just north of the tracks, she added.

The train was uncoupled, with each segment on both sides of the FM 3441 intersection, through which traffic proceeded. Traffic was blocked by the front portion of the uncoupled train at the Carver Avenue intersection, to the west. None of the train’s cars appeared to be derailed.

Jun

18

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 18, 2014

By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent

MALAKOFF–The family of an Iowa man who died of a heart attack following a reckless driving incident with an off-duty Malakoff police officer late last year has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the city, where the later-indicted officer remains on administrative leave with pay.

Records obtained through a public information request made April 23 by The News and obtained June 6 include court documents filed April 24 in federal court in Marshall by Tyler and Sulphur Springs attorneys representing the family of William Livezey. The suit alleges that the city of Malakoff used “substandard and inadequate hiring and screening policies” when it hired Ernest Fierro, who has a checkered past as a Dallas police officer.
The lawsuit also claims the city of Malakoff “implemented policies, procedures and practices which actually interfered with and caused (Fierro’s) wrongful acts and/or omissions,” according to the court filing. The lawsuit continues: “These official policies of the city of Malakoff were the moving force behind the wrongful acts and/or omissions plead for herein that was a direct and proximate cause of the death.”

The Livezey lawsuit asks a jury to award an unspecified amount “for each element of damages that is just and fair, based on the evidence.” Also filed in federal district court was an April 28 summons to Malakoff Mayor DeLois Pagitt notifying the city of the lawsuit, which names both Fierro and the city of Malakoff as defendants.
Other documents obtained through the public information request show that Fierro’s Malakoff employment application included his Dallas police record. That record reflects Fierro’s Nov. 2005 resignation while under investigation for a violation of the department’s chase policy, and 2001 termination following Class B misdemeanor criminal accusations not specified in documents, which Fierro successfully appealed down to a 20-day suspension to continue his Dallas police employment. A police officer who resigns while under investigation usually loses his or her state peace officer’s license, but Fierro successfully appealed to state officials to keep it, The Dallas Morning News reported in 2008.

Fierro’s employment file also includes letters of recommendation, including one from a former Dallas Police Department (DPD) colleague and another from the mayor pro tem of the Ellis County city of Ferris, where Fierro worked before Malakoff.

“I have always found Ernesto to be very reliable, truthful, ethical and very hard-working,” wrote Armando Dominguez Jr., a senior corporal with the DPD canine squad.

Ferris Mayor Pro Tem Gary Ross also put in a good word for Fierro during his Malakoff job application process. “I recommend him to you without reservation,” Ross wrote. Fierro resigned July 15, 2013 with a general discharge from the Ferris Police Department and was eligible for rehire, according to documents, then was hired July 31 by the city of Malakoff.

Other former employers were not as glowing. In a background investigation questionnaire dated July 25, Ferris Police Chief Sam Love was asked to categorize Fierro as an employee, with choices of excellent, good, average or poor. Love chose average. When asked how Fierro takes receiving corrections or being critiqued by a supervisor, Love wrote “fair.” When asked whether Fierro followed instructions well and worked well with co-workers, the Ferris police chief chose both yes and no.

Another document obtained through the public information request shows that Fierro was placed on administrative leave with pay from the city of Malakoff on Feb. 22 “pending further investigation and completion of a criminal trial,” Malakoff Police Chief Billy Mitchell wrote in a letter sent to Fierro’s Dallas address officially notifying the officer of the leave.

That letter came three days after a Navarro County grand jury indicted Fierro Feb. 19 for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, official oppression and reckless driving related to a Dec. 11 incident alongside State Highway 31 east of Corsicana, during which the grand jury indictment alleges Fierro ran Livezey off the road with his motorcycle, then held him in handcuffs until Navarro County deputies arrived on the Chambers Creek bottom scene after numerous calls to 911. Livezey, 70, soon fell ill and collapsed, then was sent by ambulance to Navarro Regional Hospital in Corsicana, where he died of a heart attack. Jury selection for Fierro’s criminal trial is set to begin July 21 in state district Judge James Lagomarsino’s Corsicana court.

Several other documents requested by The News were not produced by the city’s attorney, Hank Skelton of the Athens law firm Kugle, Skelton and Bennett, who claimed the information’s release was protected by state law. Some of those documents include the investigation into Livezey’s death by Cleburne-based Texas Ranger Michael Stoner, a memorandum regarding Fierro from Chief Mitchell to City Administrator Ann Barker the day after Livezey’s death, and an affidavit from Fierro five days after the incident.

Jun

05

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 5, 2014

Athens Fire-Shawna Smith-5-29

By Erik Walsh
Monitor Staff Writer

ATHENS–Monday, investigators reported that the cause of the May 29 fertilizer storage facility fire in downtown Athens is “undetermined.” Criminal intent was ruled out, due to the absence of evidence identifying an ignition source. Until Monday, the facility had been treated as a crime scene. After the findings were issued, the East Texas Ag Supply property was released to its owner.

The findings were issued by the Texas State Fire Marshal’s Office in conjunction with the Athens Fire Department, Henderson County Fire Marshal’s Office and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (Dallas Field Division).

“The fire originated in the northwest quadrant of the building, at ceiling level. Based on the origin of the fire, the only causes that could not be eliminated are related to an electrical failure,” Athens Fire Chief John McQueary stated in a press release.

State Fire Marshal Chris Connealy stated, “Per national guidelines and standards, the fire will be classified as undetermined because the ignition source and the first material ignited could not be determined.”
The finalization of the fire investigation report is expected in the weeks ahead.

“The city appreciates the hard work and investigation by the agencies involved in determining the final conclusion regarding this incident,” Athens Mayor Jerry Don Vaught said shortly after the findings were released Monday.

The time between the departure of the last person from the facility’s 105 Larkin St. location May 29 and it being engulfed in flames 30 minutes later, had raised suspicion of possible criminal intent. The findings also ruled out weather as a factor.

East Texas Ag Supply owner Ken McGee was the last to leave the facility at around 5:15 p.m., McQueary said during a press conference the following day. “By 5:45 p.m., the building was almost fully enveloped in flames,” McQueary said. “The timetable is highly unusual and may not have been accidental.” McGee had just received 70 tons of ammonium nitrate fertilizer earlier that day, he added.

The fire caused massive disruption to the downtown area sending up a column of smoke that could be seen from Mabank, leading to an evacuation zone that first included three city blocks and was later expanded to five. More than 300 residents were forced to leave their homes that evening. They were able to return Friday, after officials with the Environmental Protection Agency conducted air quality tests with negative results for toxicity. Fifty displaced residents who could not find shelter at hotels, motels, friends or family stayed at the Cain Center.

The blaze also disrupted the opening festivities to the 83rd annual Old Fiddlers Reunion. The jam session usually held the night before the competition was canceled. The competition slated for May 31, was held at the Athens Courthouse Square as planned, along with the second annual Walk a Mile in Her Shoes march and fundraiser. Nearby businesses and Trinity Valley Community College closed as a precaution and vehicle traffic was rerouted along Loop 7. On Friday the U.S. Post Office was inaccessible.

According to McQuery, the storage facility contained more ammonium nitrate than the one that caused the massive blast in West last year that killed 15 people. The Athens fire resulted in no injuries.

“What you had here is somewhat larger than a storage shed in the back that houses your gasoline can, fertilizer, flower seed,” McQueary said. West had a large facility that housed not only ammonium nitrate, but also anhydrous ammonia and trucks that ran on gasoline- and diesel.“They had tractor trailers and a lot of products that can contaminate,” he said.

May

23

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : May 23, 2014

Farm and Ranch 010 EDIT

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff

ATHENS–The Athens Chamber of Commerce hosted its 51st Annual Henderson County Farm & Ranch Tour May 20, culminating with Ken McGee, Jr. receiving the 25th Joe B. Fulgham Agriculturist of the Year award.
After beginning the day at 8 a.m. at the Cain Center with complimentary coffee and donuts, a crowd of more than 200 piled into busses provided by Athens Independent School District and departed for the three agricultural tour sites.

The first stop was the TVCC Ranch, a 254-acre facility in Malakoff. The ranch is managed by TVCC instructors Marc Robinson and Brent Bratton, along with three students who live on the grounds. According to a press release from TVCC, Henderson County Agrilife Extension Agent Rich Hirsch told the crowd on hand that the TVCC Ranch is an important stop on the Farm & Ranch Tour, which aims to highlight the facilities that help fuel a $130 million agriculture industry in the county.

“TVCC offers a lot of good courses in agriculture and ranch management,” Hirsch said. “(This ranch) is not only a great resource for the college, but for Henderson County.”

After loading back onto the buses, the Farm & Ranch Tour made its second stop at the Rafter C Ranch, a 900 acre ranch of rolling hills and Bermuda grass. It is owned by Pete Carr and managed by Clay McCallie. The ranch is home to 270 horses, 50 bulls and 60 roping steers. The National Finals Rodeo picked 17 horses and 10 bulls from the Rafter C Ranch, more than any other stock producer in the country. It is also the home to Wise Guy, past Bucking Horse of the Year. Cowboys scored 90 or above on Wise Guy, more than any other horse in history.
The last stop on the Farm & Ranch Tour was the Sanctuary Ranch, L.P, located five miles west of Cross Roads. Sanctuary Ranch operates on just shy of 3,000 acres and is divided into three segments: cattle, whitetail deer breeding (the offspring are released into the wild to enhance the genetic quality of native deer) and a private segment for the owner, family and friends to enjoy.

Buses arrived back at the Cain Center at 11:45 in time for a noon barbecue lunch.
Former Bastrop County Judge Ronnie McDonald was the keynote speaker, citing the importance of being an “ag believer.” He is currently working with the directors of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Services and the Texas A&M Forest Service.

A true “ag believer,” McDonald said, can become an “ag leader,” and share the message of agriculture with the public, government officials and fellow agricultural producers. “Ag leaders understand the concept of reaping and sowing,” he said. “Things don’t just happen on their own.”

Finally, the event concluded with Ken McGee, Jr. receiving the Joe B. Fulgham Agriculturist of the Year award. McGee’s father, Kenneth, won the same award in 1993.

McGee is a graduate of Athens High School and Texas A&M University. After college, McKee returned to Athens to join his father in the agriculture business of raising cattle and maintaining a herd of cross-bread steers that are mainly sold to participants in the Henderson County Livestock Show. He is the owner-operator of AgServices in Athens.

May

23

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : May 23, 2014

gilmore

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff

ATHENS-Investigators released new information that led to the May 9 arrest of former Malakoff Independent School District Police Chief Todd Gilmore for theft of property valued between $1,500-$20,000.
According to an arrest warrant affidavit from the Athens Police Department (APD), Gilmore confessed to stealing $1,500 cash from Carroll-Lehr Funeral Home in Athens after being confronted with video surveillance evidence.
The affidavit states that video surveillance showed Gilmore arrive at the funeral home in his MISD vehicle, where he was employed as a contract labor embalmer, at 10:23 p.m. April 28. After gaining access to the building, the time stamp on the video surveillance immediately changed from 22:25:35 to 22:51:34 – a 26 minute gap.

Michael Conley, a representative of the funeral home, stated that Gilmore had no contract work at the funeral home that night and, according to the funeral home’s technical support team, unplugging the surveillance system main power cord from the wall outlet would account for the time stamp gap. Conley also brought attention to a chair near the filing cabinet where the missing cash was stored. After the 26-minute gap, the chair in front of the file cabinet had a noticeable change in position. Conley suspected Gilmore moved it to gain access to the filing cabinet.

Additional video showed Gilmore enter the main front office area, turn on the office lights and file a document before turning off the lights and leaving the building. Conley believes Gilmore allowed himself to be seen in the office doing paperwork as an excuse to be in the building, according the affidavit.
The reporting officer to the initial theft report Friday May 2, Corporal William Carlow, of the APD, contacted Gilmore by phone May 6, and the two met at the police department the next day. During the interview, Gilmore admitted to taking the $1,500 cash.

Gilmore was arrested on May 9 and was jailed for six minutes before posting a $10,000 bond. Malakoff ISD Superintendent Randy Perry said Gilmore resigned as MISD Police Chief May 7. Gilmore has been the district’s chief since April 2008. Before that, he served as a police officer with Parkland Hospital in Dallas for eight years, and an officer with the City of Malakoff from 1992-2000. He has been a licensed funeral director and embalmer for more than 25 years.

Mar

31

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : March 31, 2014

The News Photo/Erik Walsh
Coach Todd Gilleland (right) gives tips and direction to the players on the Rangers Little League team in Malakoff March 21.

WEBSITE PIC