Aug

11

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 11, 2011

Jail Cell-Alcatraz

It took 23 years, but a man wanted for aggravated sexual assault of a child in Henderson County was reportedly arrested in New Mexico this week.

The Carlsbad Current-Argus reported that Carson Hall, 69, was arrested Tuesday on a warrant from 173rd District Court in Athens in 1988.

The Current-Argus story says Hall was convicted of indecency with a child in Cherokee County in 1984.



Because of a scheduling change, tonight is the first big Friday night of the year for Malakoff.

The Tigers will take on Cayuga in their first scrimmage of the year starting at 7 p.m. This is Malakoff’s “detergent and soap” game, with Coach Jamie Driskell asking fans to bring either a box of detergent or a couple of bars of soap (they need detergent more). The soap is a boon for the program and helps all of athletics with the tight budget.

Over in Cross Roads, The Lady ‘Cats will play host to Oakwood with JV action starting at 4:30 p.m.

The Saturday sports schedule will be very busy:


  • Malakoff Volleyball: Eustace Tournament, V, TBA

  • Cross Roads Football: Hawkins Scrimmage, there, 10 a.m.

  • Cross Roads Volleyball: Eustace Tournament, there, JV, TBA

  • Cross Roads Volleyball: Fairfield Tournament, there, V, TBA

  • Trinidad Football: Dallas Covenant Scrimmage; there, 10 a.m.




READ MORNING BRIEF

Aug

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 10, 2011


Joseph B. Touchet, 71, of Malakoff, entered into eternal rest on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011.

He was preceded in death by parents, Joseph Elais and Nelia Touchet; brother, Alfred Touchet; and sister, Emily Touchet.

He is survived by three children, Mitzi Johnson, Matt Touchet and Lisa Murray; five grandchildren, Aaron Touchet, Zach Johnson, Matthew Touchet, Kate and Clarie Murray; a great-granddaughter, Kyra Touchet; brothers, Joseph Elais and A.J. Touchet; sisters, Virgie Lemaire and Dorthy Touchet; along with many nieces, nephews and friends.

Service will be Friday 11 a.m. at Tomlinson Funeral Home 403 E. Royall Boulevard Malakoff, TX 75148 in Malakoff. Interment will follow at Post Oak Memorial Cemetery with the Rev. Charles Kimble officiating.

Online condolences can be made at www.tomlinsonfuneral.com.

Services are under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.

Aug

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 10, 2011

Photobucket

Malakoff’s Trevor Chambers carries the ball during the Black and White Scrimmage last Saturday. The Tigers get to go against a real opponent for the first time this Saturday morning when they scrimmage Cayuga here at home, starting at 9 a.m. The varsity and JV will alternate during the scrimmage.

This will be the Tigers detergent-soap scrimmage. Coach Jamie Driskell asks fans to bring a box of detergent or some bar soap (they need detergent more) to use in the athletic department. This is the kind of thing that can really help a program, particularly during a tough budget year.


READ MORNING BRIEF

Aug

09

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 9, 2011

Photobucket

While the Dow Jones melted down in New York yesterday, area residents were dealing with the results of their own local meltdown.

A piece of equipment at a Cross Roads electrical substation (pictured above) caught fire Sunday night, causing nearly 1,200 homes to lose power. By 5 p.m., all but a handful had their power back — but it was still a tough day in the Cross Roads-Shady Oaks area.

READ MORNING BRIEF

Aug

09

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 9, 2011


Jessie Mae Williams crossed from life to eternity Aug. 5, 2011 in Dallas. She was born Jan. 6, 1926 in Tennesse Colony, Texas, to Dan and Mary Polly Hill Sanders. She has lived in Malakoff since 1963. She is a retired school teacher from Ferris, Texas.
Mrs. Williams was a member of many organizations, Essence Club, Top Ladies of Distinction, ETA Phi Sororitey Inc Epsilon Chapter, Eastern Star Lodge, Calanthian Lodge, Usher Board and Womens Auxillary, Senior Womens Citizen Arts and Craft Club.
Survivors are her four daughters, LaNell (Cookie) Williams, Brenda D. Williams, Ilef M. Williams, Sheila S. and husband James Cleaver; 12 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.
She is preceded in death by her parents, Dan and Mary Polly Sanders; husband, Cad Williams Sr.; sons, James O’Lester Williams and Cad Williams Jr.; five brothers and two sisters.
Visitation will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 12, 2011 at Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.
Service will be on Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011 at 11 a.m., First Baptist Church, 220 Mitcham St. Malakoff with Rev. Robert C. Hodge officiating.
Interment will follow at New Hope #1 Cemetery in Tennessee Colony.
Online condolences can be made atwww.tomlinsonfuneral.com.
Under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.

Aug

08

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 8, 2011

Nearly 1,200 households in the Cross Roads area – including Shady Oaks and up FM 753 to at least the TVCC ranch – have been without power since about 10:30 last night, according to the Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative website.

TVEC first reported that the power would be back on by this morning, but is now saying it won’t come on until noon.

TVEC said the outage is because of “an equipment failure” at the substation.

Residents in the Cross Roads area took to Facebook and reported the substation was actually on fire, and some reported explosions.


READ MORNING BRIEF

Aug

08

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 8, 2011

By Michael V. Hannigan
The News Staff
CROSS ROADS – Aug. 8, 2011 — Nearly 1,200 households lost power last night when a substation in Cross Roads caught fire, according to Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative officials. The substation is located about halfway between Shady Oaks and Cross Roads ISD.
Outages were reported as far as Cayuga, and area residents said they saw the fire and heard an explosion from as far away as two miles.
The fire reportedly started in a piece of equipment called a regulator – which helps regulate the flow of voltage – and then spread to the wooden structure of the substation, which holds up lines and switches.
{{more}}
Monday morning, officials did not know what caused the regulator to ignite, but the record heat and prolonged drought are suspected.
Monday, literally dozens of TVEC and Oncor (which actually owns the equipment) employees were working to install a mobile substation to restore power. After the temporary substation is in place, work will start on the permanent structure.
Officials say they hope to have power restored by 5 p.m. today.
For those who are stuck at home with no power or water, First Baptist Church of Malakoff has opened its doors today. If you need a place to go, Pastor Nathan Lorick said come to FBC.
Another option for those needing help because of the power outage is calling 911, according to Henderson County Emergency Management Coordinator Joy Kimbrough.
Area residents took to Facebook last night to discuss the situation, and several families either checked in at a hotel last night or purchased a generator this morning.

Aug

08

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 8, 2011


Charles Leland Foster,

Aug

04

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 4, 2011

A couple of months ago, a bunch of us Cedar Lake Home Health and Hospice folks were out hanging out with the Malakoff First Baptists at their – well, I forgot what it was – maybe they called it a block party – but they were out there having a good time, with hotdogs and cold drinks and bouncy things, and praying and singing. We were taking their blood pressures and socializing with everybody, so that if they were to need a nurse to see about them in their homes, they would remember to call us, since we are Malakoff’s own home care agency. (And just to thrown in a more blatant plug, we’ve been taking care of folks in their homes since 1983, and people in our home, Cedar Lake Nursing Home, since 1967, when we were all just a bunch of youngsters.) I remember that hotdog, bouncy house day well, because it was the same day as the first Doggy Emergency Room adventure for Bingo. By the way, he is recovering well from the from the popped-out eyeball adventure. He sees out of it, but it still looks a little funny. One good thing about a Shih Tzu, his bangs can grow to cover it.
Back to the Baptists – Brother Nathan Lorick and 10 people from his church were just about to leave on a trip to Malawi, and he was asking for donations of men’s suits for the preachers they would be helping out there. Personally I thought this was a little strange. I don’t know why anybody would want to wear a suit if they didn’t have to, and it seems to me like just being in Africa would be a good enough excuse not to. I thought it was hot in Africa, and folks mostly went without clothes. But Brother Nathan, who I finally got to see today, tells me it is winter over there, and the weather is much more comfortable there than here right now. I’d been wanting to visit with Brother Nathan to hear about that trip, but I kept missing him. Last week, ministry assistant, Nita Cutting, told me he was out for the week baby-sitting. This because Mrs. Nathan – Jenna Lorick – and a group of laywomen were in Uganda, looking to see what they can do to help thousands of AIDS orphans living in desperate conditions there. You can see all about it at www.60feet.org. Even before the trip the children of the church raised $1,000 to help those children. They were motivated mostly by the true desire to show God’s love and mercy to the truly needy of the world, but also just a tiny bit by the offer of Bro. Nathan that if they raised $1,000 he would shave his head. They did and he did. He apparently has really fast growing hair, because I couldn’t even tell it when I saw him today. I’m sorry I missed seeing the hair cutting ceremony.
Brother Nathan told me so much good stuff I don’t have nearly enough room in this column to tell you about it. After combining forces with Rockhill Baptist church in Brownsboro, there were 25 of them who went to Uganda. During the time they were there they started 13 churches and 12,000 people answered the call to become Christians. And, choosing to make a difference in people’s physical well-being as well as their souls, they are bringing pumps for water wells to Malawi. Three of them so far, at $800 each. Once there is a pump in a well, it can bring life-saving clean water to numerous small villages. You might like to help with this. I think it would be nice if a few Methodist or Catholic, or even agnostic, dollars were to sweeten the pot and maybe help get another couple of pumps.
Then he told me of some of the other places this wandering bunch of Baptists have been, making huge differences in the lives of so many unfortunate people, and huge differences in their own lives as well. I’m out of room now, but I’m going to be telling you more about this, and also, I’ll bet there is other stuff like this going-people just going about their lives making a big difference, and not blowing their own horns about it. If you know some more stories of this kind let me know. We need all the good news we can get.

Aug

04

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 4, 2011

I would like to talk about cocaine.
I go on record as saying that cocaine is a bad drug. I would not say that all drugs are bad but I would say that cocaine is.
How are drugs harmful to a person? They become harmful to a person when they can’t participate positively in society. Actually people can be pretty hammered and still function positively in society.
Let’s consider alcohol. When my dad came home from work he would have a couple of drinks and after dinner he sat in the music room listening to classical music and drinking some more. He did his job well. During this period of his life alcohol was not a bad drug.
It is the excessive use of drugs that causes a problem.
I went to college in 1953 at an engineering school in upstate New York. The drinking age was 18 and that was the age of the average freshman. It was an all male school and almost the entire student body was drinkers. The fledgling engineers were proud of their drinking.
The fraternities all had bars in their basements and they were a significant source of income. A bottle of booze was about $3 and at a frat house mixed drinks were two bits; so was a bottle of beer. There was a big profit margin.
Some students couldn’t deal with it and ended up in the ER with alcohol poisoning. My freshman roommate soon began going to Gainor’s Bar almost every night. He had a big collection of beer glasses and flunked out.
I came through this gauntlet bloodied but unbowed but many of my brothers fell by the wayside.
The destructive aspects of the excessive use of alcohol are well known, alcoholics beat the spouse and kids, do their job poorly and get fired, beat the spouse and kids again.
My great uncle Percy was a mellow alcoholic, always had a smile and a pleasant word. Since Aunt Bertha wanted help running the logging camp she would every so often send Uncle Percy to the place where they gave him “the cure” but it never stuck. Actually Bertha didn’t need any help running the camp. Bertha could have run a Marine battalion without any help.
It is a fine line a person walks when they use drugs and it is very easy to fall off that line. This is because you feel “more like you want to” after you take them than you did before you took them. People get addicted to alcohol but there are very few castor oil addicts.
But back to cocaine. This is a drug that doesn’t give much casual use time. I knew a guy who used it only at Christmas but he was not typical. Built into the cocaine high is the desire for more, which makes it hard to stop, and good for dealers.
Even more destructive to society is that cocaine seems to do grievous harm to the conscience.
I wondered what was in Madoff’s mind when he was ripping off friend and foe alike. What was in the minds of the credit default swaps people? Why weren’t they thinking of the consequences of their actions? It was like they were without conscience. Could it be?
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, wondering where consciences go when they die.