Aug

16

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 16, 2011

By Michael V. Hannigan
The News Staff
The Malakoff Lady Tigers got off to a hot start last week, with a win on the road in Palmer and then a three-game sweep of Fruitvale Friday in their home opener.
The Lady Tigers are 2-0 on the young season.
Second-year head coach James Neal said he was happy with the results, but stressed there was plenty of work to be done.
“We need more teamwork,” he said. “My biggest thing is communication.”
{{more}}
Coach said right now the Lady Tiger defense is ahead of the offense, but it is still very early. Consider that the Lady Tigers played in two scrimmages and two matches before the football Tigers stepped onto the field for their first scrimmage.
Neal stressed conditioning in the preseason and it paid off in Malakoff’s first match, a five-game win over Palmer.
“That was very important because of the way it went last year,” said Neal, “when we lost a few five-setters. That was a positive.”
Neal said he has high expectations for this year and set the season’s theme as “One.”
“One pass, one set, one kill,” he said. “One game, one at a time.”
The Lady Tigers were scheduled to travel to Fruitvale on Tuesday night and then compete in a tournament in Eustace starting Thursday, but those games came after The Malakoff News deadline this week.

Aug

16

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 16, 2011

Henderson County Commissioners

Aug

16

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 16, 2011

Special to The News
Charles Ray Robinson, 56, was sentenced to life in the penitentiary Monday by 3rd District Court Judge Mark Calhoon for the May 16, 2010 robbery of the Shell Station at 1117 East Tyler Street in Athens.
Robinson initially pleaded not guilty to the offense and a jury trial was held in March of this year. The jury heard testimony from the victim, a DNA analyst, the first officers to respond to the scene as well as detective James Bonnette and lead detective Bill Carlow of the Athens Police Department. In addition to the detective

Aug

14

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 14, 2011

Freshman 14

Attention area freshmen – it is time to get ready! Freshman orientation is scheduled for the following schools:


Hard to believe the summer is almost over.



The Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees will be holding its regular meeting tonight at 7 p.m. in the administration building. Items on the agenda include setting a public hearing for the budget and proposed tax rate, and a presentation on the Tool summer food program.

Earlier in the month, school board members seemed likely to keep the tax rate as is despite state funding cuts.


READ MORNING BRIEF

Aug

12

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 12, 2011

Time hits again, mentally and physically. Once I doubted back pain. Why, the complainer was walking. But then so many complained. Pain was in their eyes.
My dad as a younger man spent weeks in a hospital in traction for his back.
At 35 I faced a back dilemma. Where we lived at the time, several women wanted to start a basketball team for fun, exercise, and competition. Since I had played four years in high school, half court style, and been a “rover” on a community college team, I saw little need to attend practices with some who had never played, knew nothing about the game. At 5’6″ in my canvas hightop shoes in high school, I was the tallest and guarded the post. We may have won two games in my high school experiences. But a game was a place to go, people to see, songs to sing, and the boy’s team rode the same bus with us on away games.
That rover spot was a joke for me. It meant two team members could run the full court, crossing the line. The assignment nearly killed me.
But back to that women’s team. Finally I dressed appropriately, had some athletic shoes, and went to practice. I could dribble, pass and catch the ball. This night I might have been introduced with my experience. And we were practicing long shots.
After bouncing the ball a few times, feeling awkward, I began shooting for the basket. With the third thrust to the basket, a branding iron hit the pit of my back. Casually I made it to the wall to rest. Then almost crawling, I went out to my car, drove home, and lost all the food intake I had eaten that day. Eventually I was back to normal and never mentioned the game again.
But then I took a hard fall when I was in my late forties, the mother of teens and a high school teacher. When I stood up, I knew my lower back was on fire. But I sat down, skipped lunch, and endured the day. I was teaching Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales.” Who else could teach it? Sitting in a wooden chair with a heating pad on my back, I taught and took Ibuprofen or something like it. Once home, I lay on the floor, sometimes a vibrator under me.
The pain in the back went to the hip. The next year that line of pain ran down my leg. Soon I noticed my foot attached to that leg having numb places.
Then, almost three years later, Spring Break came, and the first morning to celebrate I sat up, and bombs went off in my back. I had ruptured or “blown” my lower disk three ways. I could not straighten up or walk, only crawl in agony while the attitude of my busy family will be ignored at this time.
From my bed with my phone I found a military-retired surgeon at Medical City. I had one visit. The doctor said, “I can tell your pain is intense; I’ll operate Thursday, and you walk out Friday, pain free. Walk is all you are to do for six weeks. Your scar will be one inch in length because you’re overweight.” I could have wept from faith and happiness.
Last year my husband lifted something too heavy and the result was his first incapacitation at 76. He had to have surgery on three vertebrae and something done to his sciatic nerve. Once home, had much to deal with. One night in pain, he looked at me disgustedly and said, “You just can’t imagine the problems I’m having. You’ve never had back pain.”
Hitting him would not have been right.

Aug

12

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 12, 2011

There is an expression that began with naval air mechanics, or so a Navy man told me. No matter how much care the mechanics take in maintaining their aircraft, and they take a lot of care, every once in awhile, for some unexpected reason, something would go wrong. When this occurred the mechanics would say, “**** happens.”
A less military name for this occurrence is “anomaly.” An anomaly is an irregularity or a result that deviates from the expected or the norm. I read that in a dictionary.
A seven-inch down pour in Phoenix would be an anomaly in their weather. The weather in Portland, Oregon doesn’t usually include tornados and a twister in The City of Roses would be a weather anomaly. Tornados are expected in the Midwest and their occurrence in Oklahoma would hardly be an anomaly.
On the other hand some people would consider a tornado an anomaly in the pressure-temperature map, no matter how many of them were tearing apart Pratt, Kansas.
I think that serial killers are anomalies in humanity. I don’t expect the person standing next to me at the bus stop to be a serial killer.
But how often does something have to occur before it ceases to be an anomaly and becomes expected. How many serial killers have to be hacking their way to notoriety before they are no longer unexpected and I have to look at the people at the bus stop out of the corner of my eye.
At one time I would have thought that parents killing their young children was a parenting anomaly but there is one in the news all the time now.
Anomalies need not be a complete surprise, just unpredictable. I think of hurricanes as anomalies even though the existence of a hurricane season belies their complete unexpectedness. (Is that a cool word or what?)
But what I’m getting around to is this: What is a reasonable attitude toward an anomaly? Anger?
Is it reasonable to get mad at destructive anomalies like hurricanes or erupting volcanoes? Should the Japanese be angry at the earth quake-tsunami anomaly that caused so much damage and loss of life? If a deranged person, an anomaly, does away with someone near and dear do you get angry at the anomaly and call for the death penalty?
It isn’t clear that anger does any good.
Thus Spake The Old Fogy, thinking that when things happen, just grin and bear it.

Aug

12

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 12, 2011

By Emily Lundy
Special to Living Well
We were in Austin over the weekend; I told myself we were a little cooler. Thinking positively is supposed to help, I hear. I love the rain, the sounds, the scents, the falling of drops, everything about it. Please let it come.

Pat Holcomb of Waco died last week; he was honored at a memorial service last Saturday. His parents were Hawk and Alpine Holcomb, and Hawk worked for TP&L. Pat becomes the fifth male to leave this life from the Class of 1958 at THS. His wife Jeanne moved here in the late fifties; they met and their love lasted almost fifty years with three daughters delighting them and their families. Pat was quarterback standout for THS while an upperclassman and was a school leader. He received a BB scholarship to HCJC, graduated from SMU and became a No. 1 fan of professional and college sports. He dealt with diabetes most of his life and then later a form of leukemia.

Evelyn Beavers has a malignant mole on the lower face. She didn’t need this diagnosis as she continues to live alone, trying not to fall. She has visiting nurses. One of her sons and his wife will retire to this area in late December.

A brother of the late Tom Finley is seriously ill.

Jerry Crocker will undergo open-heart surgery this week. This devoted Trojan fan has many friends and a loving family. We wish the best of everything for a healthier Jerry.

Ms. Eddie has returned home from her stay in the hospital and is glad to be in her own home. A niece here is staying at night with her.

Churches are collecting school supplies here for students. Others can collect too and take items to a school office.

Please let someone at one of our churches know if you do not have cooling air of some kind.

Mayor Estes and wife Fran attended Pat Holcomb’s memorial last weekend.
Joel May has been in and out of the hospital recently. He is home now at Beachwood Estate.

Most teachers in the area will be officially reporting to schools next week. I am not sure about the first day of school for students in the different districts.
Three new children checked into TISD last week.

Here we all are, standing in the need of prayer: Dot Meadows, Winston Thornberg, Eugene Berry, James Looney, Claude Jackson, Carol Stevenson, Don Wilbanks, Veterans in homes around the area, the family of Ron Holt, Roberta Staples, Ginger Frasier, Raymond Tubbs, Christopher Brown, Martha Perry, Ruby Williams, Don Ellison, Jack Lundy, Royce Heickman’s daughter, Barbara Thompson, David Lohman, last year’s senior class as they make choices for life, our fighting military, Miles Norris, Andre Anderson, Waylon Hill, Lauren Hebrank, Tyler Norris, Louis Stanton, Cord Smith, Billy Tinney.

Aug

12

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 12, 2011

By Michael V. Hannigan
The News Staff
The Malakoff City Council on Monday night approved the 2011-2012 budget for the Malakoff Crime Control and Prevention District.
The budget calls for spending about $72,000, with most of the money going to pay for two full-time police officers and one part-time officer. It also includes purchasing a couple of tasers and two computers.
The Crime Control and Prevention District was created in November 2008 when voters approved a three-eighths of a penny increase to the sales tax. The district can use its money to fund a wide range of police and law enforcement activities such as paying for more officers or equipment, community-related crime prevention programs, drug treatment programs or youth programs.
In a related move, the council reappointed three members of the district board to two year terms: Tommy Hayes, Tim Trimble and Pat Isaacson.
Malakoff Police Chief Billy Mitchell released the department’s monthly report for July, including:
- Service calls: 78
- Offense reports: 22
- Arrests: 8
- Agency assists: 4
- Citizen assists: 0
- Accidents: 2
- Citations: 265
- Warnings: 18
- Alarms: 4
- Cases filed with DA: 3
- Cases filed with CA: 7
- Total fuel: 789.5 gallons
- Total miles: 7,915

Aug

11

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 11, 2011


Robert Edwin Knuckles of Malakoff passed away on Aug. 10, 2011 in Tyler at the age of 49. Mr. Knuckles was born on Nov. 8, 1961 in Wilmington, Ohio, to William and Aline Knuckles.
Survivors are his wife, Diane Knuckles of Malakoff; daughters, Adrian Knuckles of Mount Vernon, Ohio, Brittney Newman of Ohio, Michelle and husband Billy Sparks of Malakoff; sons, Michael and Bonnie Spencer of Deltona, Fla., Troy Spencer of Pittsburgh, Penn.; bother, William and Beth Knuckles of Gahanna, Ohio; and four grandchildren.
He is preceded in death by his father William Knuckles.
Visitation will be on Saturday, Aug. 13, from 6-8 p.m. at Tomlinson Funeral Home in Malakoff.
Services will be on Sunday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, Malakoff with the Rev. Charles Kimble officiating.
Online condolences can be made at www.tomlinsonfuneral.com.
Services are under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.

Aug

11

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : August 11, 2011

Jail Cell-Alcatraz

It took 23 years, but a man wanted for aggravated sexual assault of a child in Henderson County was reportedly arrested in New Mexico this week.

The Carlsbad Current-Argus reported that Carson Hall, 69, was arrested Tuesday on a warrant from 173rd District Court in Athens in 1988.

The Current-Argus story says Hall was convicted of indecency with a child in Cherokee County in 1984.



Because of a scheduling change, tonight is the first big Friday night of the year for Malakoff.

The Tigers will take on Cayuga in their first scrimmage of the year starting at 7 p.m. This is Malakoff’s “detergent and soap” game, with Coach Jamie Driskell asking fans to bring either a box of detergent or a couple of bars of soap (they need detergent more). The soap is a boon for the program and helps all of athletics with the tight budget.

Over in Cross Roads, The Lady ‘Cats will play host to Oakwood with JV action starting at 4:30 p.m.

The Saturday sports schedule will be very busy:


  • Malakoff Volleyball: Eustace Tournament, V, TBA

  • Cross Roads Football: Hawkins Scrimmage, there, 10 a.m.

  • Cross Roads Volleyball: Eustace Tournament, there, JV, TBA

  • Cross Roads Volleyball: Fairfield Tournament, there, V, TBA

  • Trinidad Football: Dallas Covenant Scrimmage; there, 10 a.m.




READ MORNING BRIEF