Nov

15

Posted by : admin | On : November 15, 2017

Ed Lewis Obit

Robert Edward Lewis, Jr. was born July 1, 1953 in E. St. Louis, Ill., to parents Robert Edward and Lois Sevata (Garner) Lewis, Sr. and entered eternal rest on June 15, 2017 in Kaufman at the age of 63. Eddie, as he was known by family and friends, was a kind, caring and loving man who will be greatly missed by all. Ed joined the U.S. Marine Corps on Nov. 1, 1974, and reached the rank of Corporal.
He was a proud Marine and a Veteran of the Vietnam War. During his time in the Marine Corps, he received the National Defense Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Rifle Sharpshooter Badge, Meritorious Mast and Letter of Appreciation. Ed was honorably discharged on Jan. 10, 1977.
When he returned home after his time with the Marine Corps, he worked as a truck driver, electrician and plumber. In his spare time, he enjoyed yard work, building treasures in his wood shop, watching TV and eating jerky and cheese puffs with his great niece Naomee.
Ed was preceded in death by his father and sister Sandra Faye Pruitt.
He is survived by his wife Vickie and daughters Amanda and Lauren Lewis of Kemp, sons Jeff Thomas and spouse Chasidy of Ferris, Andrew Thomas and spouse Connie of Ferris, and Brian Blackwell and spouse Dorothy of Sulphur Springs, mother Lois Lewis and sister Lois Gutheinz both of Terrell, sister Jeanette Overturn and spouse Jimmy of Honey Grove, nine grandchildren with one on the way, numerous nieces, nephews and other loving family members and many more friends.
Graveside service will be held at Cedar Creek Memorial Park, 16701 State Hwy. 198 North, Mabank at 11 a.m Nov. 18, 2017. Family is encouraged to meet at Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home, 601 State Hwy. 198 at Walnut, Mabank by 10:45 a.m. and proceed to the cemetery with the escort of the East Texas Patriot Guard Riders. Officiating clergy is Bruce Gibson, pallbearer is Chris Mays and honorary pallbearer and family escort John Farmer. The family would also like to thank Pathway Hospice for their help and compassion.
Afterglow
I’d like the memory of me to be a happy one.
I’d like to leave an afterglow of smiles when life is done.
I’d like to leave an echo whispering softly down the ways.
Of happy times and laughing times and bright and sunny days.
I’d like the tears of those who grieve, to dry before the sun.
Of happy memories that I leave when life is done.
Unknown

Nov

09

Posted by : admin | On : November 9, 2017

Armbruster obit

Funeral services for Bill Armbruster were held Nov. 4, 2017 at Cedar Creek Bible Church in Seven Points with Rev. Bob Perry officiating.
Bill was born Aug. 4, 1940 in Blasdell, N.Y. to parents William James and Harriet (Cramer) Armbruster and entered into eternal rest Nov. 1, 2017 at the age of 77.
Bill married his sweetheart, Betty Lou, Aug. 25, 1962 at the Blasdell Gospel Church in Blasdell, N.Y.
He loved his family and enjoyed spending time with them. Bill was an avid hunter. He could work on anything and fix it. Bill attended Cedar Creek Bible Church. He was an amazing husband, father and grandfather. Those who knew and loved him will truly miss him.
Bill was preceded in death by his parents, sister Diane and brothers Donald, Dennis and Terry.
He is survived by his loving wife Betty Lou Armbruster of Scurry, son Bruce Armbruster of Scurry, son Wayne Armbruster of Maple Valley, Wash., daughter Yavonne Beth Schulze of Gig Harbor, Wash., grandchildren Gordon, Brooke, Elizabeth, Andrew, Mason, Colten, Savannah, Eddie and Kelly, brother Dick Armbruster of Hamburg, N.Y., other loving family members and many more friends.
A personal tribute may be made online at www.eubankcedarcreek.com.

Nov

09

Posted by : admin | On : November 9, 2017

Bufkin Obit

Funeral services for Esta Erma Dean Bufkin were held Nov. 5, 2017, at Anderson-Clayton Brothers Funeral Home.
Dean was born Nov. 12, 1932 in Kemp to parents Robert Carter and Daisy (Howard) Carter as the youngest of seven children and entered into eternal rest Nov. 1, 2017 at the age of 84.
Dean was a fun loving, family loving, friendly and outgoing person. She enjoyed prospecting in the mountains and trying to ski.
Dean started school in Tolosa, later in Kemp and graduated from Kaufman High School. She worked for many years at the Locke-Purnell, Boren, Laney, Neely and Roberts law firm. Dean had two sons, six grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren.
Dean married to Gene Douglas Bufkin Feb. 22, 1954. They had one son and two granddaughters.
Dean was preceded in death by her parents, two brothers, Cully and Clarence Carter, son Steven Lewis and four sisters, Bertha Tackett, Lois Slovak, Irene Houston and Donnie Turner.
She is survived by her loving husband of 63 years, Douglas Gene Bufkin of Kemp, son Clarence Douglas and wife of Milton, Fla., grandchildren and great-grandchildren, numerous nephews and nieces, other loving family members and many more friends.
A personal tribute may be made at www.andersonclaytonkemp.com.

Nov

09

Posted by : admin | On : November 9, 2017

Kaylee Hall

Kaylee and Kenlie were inseparable. The two were sisters and best friends.
They enjoyed dancing, swimming and riding their bicycles. Kaylee and Kenlie loved cheerleading and having their pictures taken and showing their beautiful smiles.
They both attended Southside Elementary and loved playing and spending time with their best friends Nadia, Katie and Alyiah. The girls were sometimes mischievous, especially when they picked on their brother Wyatt. Kaylee and Kenlie both loved getting new shoes and their faces would light up with excitement and joy when anyone came to visit. These precious girls have touched the hearts of many and will never be forgotten. All who have had the chance to be a part of their lives will truly miss Kaylee and Kenlie.
Kaylee Danielle Hall was born on June 18, 2010 in Garland and received her angel’s wings on Nov. 2, 2017 at the age of seven. Kaylee is survived by her father Jacob Henderson of Mabank, brother Wyatt William Watson of Caddo Mills, grandparents Ricky “Pops” and Kristy “Mamak” Henderson of Seagoville, Teresa Brown of Kaufman and Jimmy Tally and wife Debbie of Kemp, numerous aunt and uncles, other loving family members and many more friends.
Kenlie Alisabeth Pallett was born on Jan. 21, 2012 in Dallas and received her angel’s wings on Nov. 2, 2017 at the age of five.
She was preceded in death by her grandmother Peggy Shipley and her great-grandmother Mae McEuen.
Kenlie is survived by her father Danny Pallett and Tonya Uzzell of Seven Points, brother Wyatt William Watson of Caddo Mills, brothers and sisters Riley Pallett, Skiler Pallett, Shayna Uzzell, Brittany Uzzell, Kaylie Uzzell and Michael Uzzell, grandfather Dan Pallett of Eustace, step-father Jacob Henderson of Mabank, grandparents Ricky “Pops” and Kristy “Mamak” Henderson of Seagoville, grandmother Teresa Brown of Kaufman, great-grandfather Billy McEuen of Murphy, numerous aunts and uncles, other loving family members and many more friends.
Services were held for Kaylee and Kenlie on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017 at Eubank Cedar Creek Memorial Chapel in Mabank with Gayle Cogburn officiating.
You may leave a personal tribute online at www.eubankcedarcreek.com.

Nov

08

Posted by : admin | On : November 8, 2017

Chuck Oram
By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Though not exactly a wish come true, Vietnam veteran Chuck Oram got to pilot a helicopter for a 30-minute cruise around Cedar Creek Lake Oct. 25. What’s so remarkable about this, is the former Army Chinook helicopter pilot is nearing 83 years of age and hasn’t piloted a craft since the 1990s.
However, the long-held desire kept within his heart unspoken could not be suppressed while among the warmth of friends and neighbors from Wood Canyon Waters, most of whom are former military officers.
“This all happened because I said, ‘Damn, I sure would like to get back in a Chinook again,’” he said. His friends took his desire as their mission. Though they couldn’t acquire the twin rotor Chinook, so heavily relied upon during the Vietnam War, they got their friend back into a helicopter.
Col. Charles “Chuck” Oram served 27 years in the U.S. Army as an aviator of fixed wing and helicopters and trained as a Ranger. He completed one tour of Korea and two in Vietnam. He joined the military after two years of college because he was uncertain as to where to focus, hoping the experience would give him clarity. He thought two years of service ought to do it. And he was right. The military afforded him the opportunity to serve and excel with distinction. No wonder he missed being a part of something bigger than himself.
Friend B.J. Hall knew a Dallas businessman who frequently flew his own helicopter to keep up with his many construction projects around the state. When Mark Jacobson heard about the mission, he didn’t hesitate to make his Robinson 44 craft available to the Army aviator.
All this came as a complete surprise to Oram, who thought he was just “talking out loud” while among friends. His wife, Sue, orchestrated a regular event of the occasion, setting up hot coffee and doughnuts at the Gun Barrel City Park Pavilion, along with photos and memorabilia from his military career. The volunteer fire department cleared the pad for the surprise flight, and Oram was taken out for breakfast with a drive through the park on the way back, where the whole neighborhood was assembled to greet him and watch his takeoff.
Unfamiliar with the controls of the small craft, it took a little while for him to achieve lift off. Oram said that while the adventure wasn’t even close to the five-crew member Chinook, “it was a lot of fun. And Sue really liked it.”
The most spectacular mission in Vietnam for the Chinook was the placing of artillery batteries in perilous mountain positions inaccessible by any other means, and then keeping them resupplied with large quantities of ammunition. As part of the 101st Airborne Division, Oram’s Chinook battalion would supply munitions to active combat zones and fly out the wounded. Chuck served midway through 1966 to 1967 with eight months stateside and back again for another year in 1968.
He and his crew rescued another Chinook crew that had been shot down in the An Lo Valley, and for that, Chuck was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism or extraordinary achievement during an aerial flight. He also received air medals for meritorious achievement during an aerial flight. One of these was performed by airlifting a plane from Savannah, Ga. to Atlanta for maintenance (see photograph).
As with any new piece of equipment, the Chinook’s introduction presented a major problem of “customer education”. Commanders and crew chiefs had to be constantly alert that eager soldiers did not overload the temptingly large cargo compartment. The Chinook soon proved to be such an invaluable aircraft for artillery movement and heavy logistics that it was seldom used as an assault troop carrier. Some of the Chinook fleet was used for casualty evacuation, and due to the very heavy demand for the helicopters, they were usually overburdened with wounded. Perhaps the most cost-effective use of the Chinook was the recovery of other downed aircraft.Oram was one of the older aviators during Vietnam being in his 30s, he said. After Vietnam, Oram continued his military career and completed his education with a degree in business from the University of Nebraska. In 1980, he was offered an assignment in Europe, which he declined for family priorities and took retirement, at age 46. He was recalled to active duty during the Iraq Operation Freedom to organize aviation maintenance for a year, then retired for the last time.
Afterward, Raytheon asked his assistance in developing a strategy to win some military contracts. He worked for the firm for a year and then retired to the lake, full time.
Though he and Sue have been very active in the POA over the years, these days Chuck focuses on his health with the three Bs: breathing deeply, balance and brain engagement. He works out at the gym four to five times a week.
He and wife Sue have been married for 61 years, produced two daughters and have five grandchildren and four great grandchildren. They have been residents of Cedar Creek Lake for 32 years.

Nov

08

Posted by : admin | On : November 8, 2017

DSC_0004 Malakof FB CMYK

By Bodey Cooper
The News Staff Writer
TEAGUE–The Malakoff Tigers lost their first game of the 2017 season on Nov. 3 against a very tough Teague Lions squad.
The Lions had more than a few long drives set up by either great passes or great blocking.
The Tigers struggled on the offensive side with three interceptions from quarterback Judd Miller.
In the end, the Lions came out on top of the Tigers 35-14 as Malakoff’s impressive winning streak came to an end.
The Tigers came into the game at 8-0 this season, and on a 20-game winning streak dating back to 2015.
The Lions offense exploded for 380 rushing yards and finished the night with 517 total yards of offense.
The Tigers finished with 326 total yards of offense against Teague.
The Tigers struggled to convert on third down against the Lions, going 3/11 on Friday night.
The loss drops the Tigers record to 8-1 overall with a 5-1 district record.
They are currently tied with both Teague and West for first place heading into the final week of the regular season.
The Tigers come home and honor their seniors in their final regular season game Nov. 10. They face off against the Elkhart Elks (3-6, 1-5 district) as they prepare for the upcoming postseason.
The Tigers went five rounds deep into the playoffs in 2016, coming just one win shy of a trip to AT&T Stadium in Arlington for the 3A State Championship game.
The Tigers defeated Troy, Kirbyville, Rockdale and Cameron Yoe before falling in a close contest, 28-24 to Yoakum. Yoakum lost to Mineola in the championship game.

Nov

08

Posted by : admin | On : November 8, 2017

Kenlie Alisabeth Pallett

Kaylee Dainelle Hall
The News Staff Reports
MABANK—The community of Cedar Creek Lake is in shock as the story of a mother who murdered her two daughters in the early morning hours of Nov. 2 continues to unfold.
The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office confirmed the arrest of 29-year-old Sarah Nicole Henderson, who is charged with capital murder in the deaths of her two daughters Kaylee Danielle Hall, 7, and Kenlie Alisabeth Pallett, 5, both students of Southside Elementary School in Mabank.
According to Hillhouse, EMS contacted his office at 11:29 p.m. Wednesday night Nov. 1, asking for assistance with a possible suicidal female at a residence outside Payne Springs. The caller called again and said he no longer needed assistance, so EMS cancelled the call seven minutes later. Deputies were already enroute and arrived at the residence, at 11:45 p.m.
Hillhouse said a male and female told deputies they were fine and no one was in danger or jeopardy.
Nearly three hours later at 2:24 a.m., the last call came from Jake Henderson, whose call to 9-1-1. was tearful, “My wife just shot her kids.” He said he went to bed after everyone else had, or so he thought. The next thing he knew his wife was standing over him saying, “Babe, I just shot the kids.” In tapes of the 9-1-1 calls, Henderson can be heard in the background saying, “Babe, what have I done?”
Hillhouse reported the children were dead at the scene. “The family was asleep other than the mother is what we’re getting in the investigation,” Hillhouse said.
The Texas Rangers, Child Protective Services and the DA’s Office are assisting with the investigation. 173rd District Judge Dan Moore issued a search warrant for the residence. Precinct 2 Justice of the Peace Kevin Pollock conducted the inquest and the bodies were transported to American Forensics in Dallas for examination. A firearm was recovered from the home.
Neighbors were questioned by investigators searching for a motive. Speculation was that the couple was having some financial difficulties and that she failed to get a job after an interview. Neighbors reported that Henderson had often spoken harshly to the children. A candlelight vigil was held at their school Nov. 2 as teachers, parents and students struggled to cope with the loss. Tearful parents and children were interviewed by television news reporters.
According to obituaries, Kaylee and Kenlie were inseparable; the two were sisters and best friends. They enjoyed dancing, swimming and riding their bicycles. Kaylee and Kenlie loved cheerleading and having their pictures taken and showing their beautiful smiles. They loved playing and spending time with their best friends Nadia, Katie and Alyiah.
Mabank ISD Superintendent Dr. Russell Marshall transferred all school counselors to Southside Thursday to lend support to staff and students. Substitute teachers were brought in to relieve staff members most closely affected by the deaths. “All campuses are pulling together to help. It’s what our school family does,” he said.
Sheriff Botie Hillhouse said in an interview, “Everybody wants to know why. I’d love to know why, but sometimes you never find the real reason why.”
Henderson confessed to the killing of her two daughters and is being held on a $2 million bond.
A GoFundMe page was created Nov. 2 under “Funeral funds for KayLee and Kenlie.” Funeral services were held Nov. 6, 2017 at Eubank Cedar Creek Memorial Chapel with a graveside service following at Eubank Cedar Creek Memorial Park. A candlelight service will be held at 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 12 at the Gun Barrel City Park Pavilion for the two sisters.

Nov

08

Posted by : admin | On : November 8, 2017

IMG_5555 Trojans FB #32 CMYK
By Bodey Cooper
The News Staff Writer
TRINIDAD–The Trinidad Trojans offense exploded Nov. 3 as they blew past the Mount Calm Panthers on senior night.
The Trojans got on the board just 1:45 into the contest on a 25-yard touchdown by Josh Stamper to give the Trojans an 8-0 lead.
The Panthers responded just 11 seconds later on a long rushing touchdown to put the score at 8-7 Trojans.
The Trojans pushed their way into the Panthers’ red zone quickly. The Trojans finished off the drive with a five-yard rushing touchdown by senior Johnny Ayala to give them a 14-7 lead with 7:32 remaining in the first quarter.
The Trojans tacked on another touchdown on a 29-yard rush by senior Talon Sims to bump the lead up 20-7.
Senior Trojans quarterback Colby Snider then threw one of his three receiving touchdowns to junior Billy Quinn, good for a nine-yard score to give the Trojans a 26-7 lead with 1:44 remaining.
The Panthers added one last touchdown before the end of the first quarter to cut the Trojans lead to 26-13.
Ayala added his second touchdown of the game on a 23-yard rush just 11 seconds into the second quarter to give the Trojans a 32-13 lead.
Sims responded with his second touchdown of the game on a two-yard rush with 7:01 remaining to push the Trojans lead to 40-13.
A long passing play, companied with a horse collar penalty at the end of the play, set up the Panthers at the Trojans’ one-yard line. The Panthers finished the drive another rushing touchdown to cut the lead once again to 40-20 with 6:43 to go in the second quarter.
Ayala once again responded with a 26-yard reception for his third touchdown of the night to give the Trojans a 48-20 lead.
A long rushing touchdown cut the lead once again to 48-26 on a rushing touchdown with 2:18 remaining.
Stamper added his second touchdown of the contest just nine seconds later with a 30-yard rushing touchdown to make the Trojans lead 54-26.
Stamper took a 17-yard reception all the way to the end zone with 28 seconds remaining in the first half to make it 60-26 Trojans.
Defensive lineman Hunter Robinson finished off the first half with an interception for the Trojans.
Robinson picked up where he left off at the start of the third quarter when he caused a fumble that was recovered by defensive back Kaelab Eastman at the Trojans’ one-yard line.
Sims added his third touchdown of the night on a 34-yard rush to give the Trojans a 40-point lead with 6:09 remaining in the third quarter.
The game ended with 4:02 left in that same third quarter after an interception by Robinson that he returned 48 yards for a touchdown to send the Trojans to a 72-26 victory over the Panthers.

Nov

02

Posted by : admin | On : November 2, 2017

IMG_2204 Athens FB #2 McBride CMYK

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–The Athens Hornets had a hard time containing Crandall Pirates running back Tyson Gatewood in a 49-21 loss Friday.
In the loss to Crandall (4-4, 2-2 in district), Gatewood finished the game with 23 carries for 224 yards and two touchdowns.
“He (Gatewood) has been good,” Athens coach Paul Essary said. “We have been playing against him for three years. He has been good all three of these years. He is a good athlete and plays hard. He is fun to watch if you are not trying to stop him.”
Essary said even with the loss, he was proud of how the guys fought during the game.
“They played hard for the last senior night on Bruce Field,” Essary said. “I am proud of them and they played hard. It is always sad when you lose a senior class because you have put so much work together with them. You want them to go out on a win. We have been fortunate here, and it may be the first one that we have not been successful on. They played hard, and I am proud of their effort.”
The contest was senior night for the Hornets as 12 players were involved in their final game at Bruce Field.
Athens (2-7 overall, 1-4 in district play) is open Friday, and wraps up the regular season Nov. 10 on the road at Brownsboro. The Bears defeated Terrell, 42-20, Friday in Brownsboro.
“We will work and try to get better for that last ballgame at Brownsboro,” Essary said. “In open week, we focus on ourselves with fundamentals and trying to get healthy. It could be the last game, and I don’t know what the playoffs look like. Regardless of what it is, it is another game and we want to do our best. The guys will work hard, and the coaching staff will work hard.”
Gatewood scored the game’s opening touchdown on an eight-yard run with 4:17 remaining in the first quarter.
Athens took a 14-7 lead late in the second quarter on two touchdowns following fumbled kickoff returns by Kaufman.
The first score came on an 18-yard run by quarterback Xavius Fulton with 6:36 remaining in the first half.
The second came on a 33-yard pass from Andrew McBride to Gary Lyons with 4:58 left. Dakota Anderson booted both PAT’s good.
Crandall quarterback Josh Redding then added a five-yard TD run to tie the game at 14 with 1:57 remaining in the first half.
In the second half, McBride capped off a nice drive with a one-yard plunge to give Athens a 21-14 lead with 8:54 left in the third.
Crandall then scored the final 35 points to put the game out of reach. The Pirates had a 34-yard pass from Redding to Keionte Robertson and a one-yard run by Redding to end the third quarter at 28-21.
“We battled with them for almost three quarters,” Essary said. “We gave up some big plays, and penalties hurt us at crucial times. You get a couple of penalties and it got us off track. We need to be driving the football.”
In the fourth, Gatewood had a three-yard run, a 52-yard pass from Steven Dearman to Hayden Pruitt and a 15-yard run by Doneric Rivers for the 49-21 finale.
“We made a few mistakes and gave up a couple of big plays tonight,” the coach said. “They were able to capitalize, and Crandall is a good football team. They are close to winning about six-or-seven games right now. They are as close as can be right now.”
Athens was led by Jerquindon Taylor with six carries for 60 yards, while McBride had 17 carries for 49 yards. McBride was 1 of 2 passing for 19 yards, with the lone pass going to Taylor.

Nov

02

Posted by : admin | On : November 2, 2017

The News Staff Reports
HENDERSON COUNTY–On Thursday, Texas R-Congressman Jeb Hensarling announced he will not be seeking re-election.
“Although service in Congress remains the greatest privilege of my life, I never intended to make it a lifetime commitment, and I have already stayed far longer than I had originally planned,” Hensarling stated. “Throughout this time, my family has graciously sacrificed for my service. As the parents of two teenagers, Melissa and I know there are only a few years left before they leave and make their own way in life. I want to be there for those years. Since my term as Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee comes to an end next year, the time seems right for my departure.”
He said that during the remaining 14 months of his term, he will continue the fight for individual liberty, free enterprise and limited constitutional government.
He expressed his appreciation and gratitude for the support he’s received and for “the trust you have placed in me to advance the principles we share.”
Also this week, in the state house Republican Speaker of the House Joe Straus announced he was not seeking re-election for the 2019 session, stopping one term short of setting a possible record as Speaker.
As late as last month (September), Straus was saying he would seek a record sixth term as speaker and that he wouldn’t be running for the House if that weren’t true.
In his statement, San Antonio Republican Straus acknowledged his decision was “unexpected.”
“It’s been decades since someone has left the Speaker’s office on his own terms,” Straus said. “But we have accomplished what I hoped the House would accomplish when I first entered this office, and I am increasingly eager to contribute to our state in new and different ways.”
“I believe that in a representative democracy, those who serve in public office should do so for a time, not for a lifetime. And so I want you to know that my family and I have decided that I will not run for re-election next year,” Straus said in a campaign email.
Brandon Rottinghaus, a political science professor at the University of Houston, called Straus’ decision a “political earthquake” and said dynamics at the Legislature will definitely shift without Straus at the helm of the House. The speaker was a relatively quiet leader for his first four terms in the job. He found his voice in 2017, pushing against social conservatives whose agenda – led by what became known as the “bathroom bill” – threatened his own desire to push economic development, infrastructure and other more or less bipartisan ideas.
State house Speaker Straus’ announcement set into motion speculation about the future of Straus’ top lieutenants. One of his closest allies, Rep. Byron Cook, R-Corsicana, who is chairman of the House State Affairs Committee, said in a statement first reported by Quorum Report that he “will pursue other opportunities to serve our great state.”
Arch-conservative members who have opposed Straus face off against more centrist Republicans. Within hours of Straus’ announcement, one of his top lieutenants, Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, announced that he had filed to run for the speaker’s post. State Rep. Phil King, R-Weatherford, had previously announced his candidacy, and others are expected to jump in.
Tea Party leaders and their allies have blamed Straus for killing controversial measures backed by the far right, most notably a bill that would have regulated which bathrooms transgender Texans could use.
Speaking with reporters after the announcement inside his office, Straus said he finally took the advice he always gives members: After any session, go home and talk to your constituents and family, and then make a decision about whether to run again.
“A confident leader knows it’s time to give it back,” Straus said.
No longer serving as speaker would allow a “greater opportunity to express my own views and priorities,” Straus said, adding that he would “continue to work for a Republican Party that tries to bring Texans together instead of pulling us apart.”
“Our party should be dynamic and forward-thinking, and it should appeal to our diverse population with an optimistic vision that embraces the future,” Straus said in the campaign email. “I plan to be a voice for Texans who want a more constructive and unifying approach to our challenges, from the White House on down.”