Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008


Services for Frances Humphrey, 70, of Trinidad were held 11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, 2008, at Trinidad Cemetery under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Homes of Malakoff.
Mrs. Humphrey died Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008, in Athens. She was born June 29, 1938, in Dawson, Texas, to the late Arthur Eugene Poston and Nellie Mae Green. She was a housewife.
She was preceded in death by husband, R.G.

Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008


Bonnie Johnson Shafer went home to be with her Lord Friday morning, Nov. 21, 2008, at her home in Malakoff after a two-year battle with cancer.
Mrs. Shafer was born in North Carolina to Floyd and Ann Jones on Dec. 18, 1938. She moved to Jacksonville, Fla., as a child and spent her young life there until moving to Texas. She has been a resident of Malakoff for over 40 years.
She is preceded in death by her father Floyd Jones, husband of 35 years David (Doc) Johnson, daughter Rhonda Cox and son-in-law Michael Hopkins.
Survivors are her husband, Jim Shafer; daughter and son-in-law, Phylis and Dave Michie of Rockwall, Texas, and their children Jennifer Umina, Jason Montgomery, Jessica Montgomery, Steven Stewart, and Shawn Michie and their families, daughter Velena Hopkins and her children Lauren, Beau, and Casey of Garland, Texas. Step-daughter, Jan and husband Chris Romine of Tulsa, Okla.; great-grandchildren, Maggie and Cash Umina and Bridget Schroder. She is survived also by her mother Ann Oviatt of Athens, sister Birleane Meeks and husband Bill of Jacksonville, Fla., brother William (Hank) Houlett and wife Barbara and their children of Athens, extended family Ted and Glenda Oviatt of Jacksonville, FL, sister-in-law Agnes Gibbs of Pilot Point, Texas, brother-in-law and wife Charles and Betty Shafer of Dallas, Amos and Jerri Shafer of Plano, Jack and Aleta Shafer of Kemp, and sister-in-law Marjorie Lambert of Carrollton, Texas; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Mrs. Shafer was blessed with great musical talents and was the music director and pianist at the First Baptist Church, Trinidad where her husband Jim is the pastor. She loved gospel music and at one time was a part of the

Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008


Graveside services for Annie Hurlburt, 77, of Kemp, were held 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008, in King Cemetery under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home of Seven Points.
Mrs. Hurlburt died Friday, Nov. 28, 2008, in Malakoff. She was born July 6, 1931, in Aley, Texas, to the late Thomas Hurlburt and Carrie Reed.
She was self employed as a nurses aid.
Mrs. Hurlburt was preceded in death by brothers, Travis Hurlburt, Andrew Hurlburt, Homer Hurlburt, Horton Hurlburt; and grandson, Michael Byler.

Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008


Graveside services for Allah Marie Murphy, 87, of Dallas, were held 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, 2008, with Charles Allen Black officiating and under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home.
Mrs. Murphy died Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2008, in Dallas. She was born Oct. 3, 1921, in Jones Prairie to the late Charles Black and Minie Blackburn.
She was preceded in death by husband, Ary Joseph Johansen and sister, Dorthy Mae Crook.
Survivors include son, Carl and wife Marsha Johansen; brother, Charles and wife Willie Mae Black; sister, Joyce Faulk; granddaughter, Stephanie and husband Pete Truly; great-grandchildren, Lucas Truly; and nieces and nephews.

Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008

I hear commentators discuss the possible causes for the economic break down. They talk about credit default swaps, sub-prime mortgages, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.
I think the reason is much more basic: greed.
The people who engineered the financial collapse weren’t poor. If they used any parsimony at all, I would suppose that they could easily keep body and soul together with their salaries and savings. They don’t really need any more money. Maybe greed starts when a person lusts after more money than they need.
A friend of mine says that greed starts when a person begins robbing the poor to make him/herself richer, so to speak. I can see that as a reasonable definition. It isn’t my business how much money a person makes or how they spend it as long as they don’t get it unethically. Maybe that’s setting the bar too high.
Greed is the impetus that pushes people to find new and more subtle schemes to accumulate more money, pushing the system to the edge of the cliff at the end of financial sanity and morality, and then, wanting just that little bit more, push it over the edge. Fall down, go boom.
Greed plays a role in the tension between what’s good for the individual and what’s good for society. Greed is often displayed by an individual when they feather their own nest using feathers plucked from the bird population at large, leaving a lot of chilly birds that winter.
We have separated ourselves into two warring camps: liberal and conservative. The liberals are focused on society and conservatives focused on the individual. (Greed, I might say is a disease that knows no ideological boundaries.)
I hear each side saying bad things about the other, mean, disparaging things. They spend their time and energy proclaiming the correctness of their particular dog in the fight.
Mr. Smotherman wrote that humans had two basic drives: survival and being right. It seems to me that being right sometimes takes precedence over survival.
But the fact is that when a government is out of balance to one side or the other, disaster follows. Liberals and conservatives need each other.
The idea that one econo-political faction is right and the rest wrong is so bizarre that I can’t even imagine it.
But instead of realizing their mutual need and each using their particular talents to form a more perfect union, they squander their talents on rancorous bickering, buying votes and selling favors.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, wondering if he is a conservative or a liberal.

Dec

05

Posted by : admin | On : December 5, 2008

It is Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving, as I start this week’s column. It will be mostly jokes, because there is no dancing going on at the center today. A little news may drift in before time for me to take this to Malakoff, but not much. But I know all of you like the jokes, so here they are.

An elderly man on a moped, looking about 100 years old, pulls up next to a doctor at a street light. The old man looks over at the sleek shiny car and asks, “What kind of car ya got there, sonny?” The doctor replies, “A Ferrari GTO. It costs half a million dollars!” – “That’s a lot of money,” says the old man. “Why does it cost so much?” – “Because this can do up to 320 miles per hour!” said the doctor proudly. The moped driver asked, “Mind if I take a look inside?” – “No problem,” replied the doctor. So the old man pokes his head in the window and looks around. Then, sitting back on his moped, the old man said, “That’s a pretty nice car, all right, but I’ll stick with my moped.” Just then the light changes, so the doctor decides to show the old man just what his car can do. He floors it, and within 30 seconds the speedometer reads 160 mph. Suddenly, he notices a dot in his rear view mirror. It seems to be getting closer! He slows down to see what it could be and suddenly WHOOOOSSSHHH! Something whips by him going much faster. “What on Earth could be going faster than my Ferrari?” the doctor asks himself. He presses harder on the accelerator and takes the Ferrari up to 250 mph. Then, up ahead of him, he sees that it’s the old man on the moped! Amazed that the moped could pass his Ferrari, he gives it more gas and passes the moped at 275 mph, and he’s feeling pretty good until he looks in the mirror and sees the old man gaining on him again! Astounded by the speed of this old guy, he floors the pedal and takes the Ferrari all the way up to 320 mph. Not ten seconds later, he sees the moped bearing down on him again! The Ferrari is flat out and there’s nothing he can do. Suddenly the moped plows into the back of his Ferrari, demolishing the rear end. The doctor jumps out and unbelievably the old man is still alive. He runs up to the banged up old guy and says, “I’m a doctor

Nov

28

Posted by : admin | On : November 28, 2008

By Pearl Cantrell

ATHENS

Nov

28

Posted by : admin | On : November 28, 2008

We live in an era of bigger is better. Maybe we always have but I have problems with the concept.

In 1950 I started high school in Tempe, Arizona. The graduating classes for the two years I was there were 17 and 23 respectively. There were 12 miles of desert between Tempe and Phoenix. There were 85,000 people in the entire Valley of the Sun. Now there are upwards of 4 million.
The Tempe I knew no longer exits; it has been swallowed up in urban sprawl. But is it better?

In 1948 when I was in Jr. High and living in Cheyenne, the family took a drive to Denver where there was an AM radio station that could be heard in Cheyenne. There weren’t any FM stations. The studio was on the mezzanine of a downtown hotel and the antenna was on the roof; this was usual for hotels in a big city. You could stand outside a plate glass window and watch some of the programs being broadcast. In the bigger, better hotels in the bigger, better cities of today there are no radio stations on the hotel mezzanines.

I began my doctoral studies at Washington University in St. Louis in 1959 and for the next four years I was a St. Louis Cardinal fan. They played in an old stadium, Sportsman’s Park. Stan Musial was playing first base. A graduate student could afford to sit in the stands with a beer and a hot dog and watch the Cardinals play.

Sportsman Park was replaced by a bigger, grander stadium, Busch Stadium, and now I hear that they are going to build a bigger, grander one yet.

Yankee Stadium, the House That Ruth Built, is being replaced by a bigger, better stadium, The House that Municipal Bonds Built.

When I lived in St. Louis I listened to all the Cardinal games on radio. Harry Carry was play-by-play and Jack Buck did color. Joe Garagiola had a pre-game show called “Fan in the Stands.” I knew the batting averages of all the Cardinals and the batting order. As a mater of fact I knew the batting averages and batting order of all the teams in the National League. There were only nine teams. I could name all the cities that had a major league team. I knew the names of players on all the teams of the American League. I didn’t feel the need of a professional team in Phoenix. Arizona State College for Teachers in Tempe was close enough. I didn’t feel deprived because Cheyenne didn’t have a professional sports team.

Now there are 16 teams in the National League and 14 in the American League. I can’t name all of them. As I write, the Boston Red Sox are playing the Tampa Bay Rays. I don’t recognize the names of any of the players and I don’t recognize the Tampa Bay Rays. An announcer said that they changed their name this year from Tampa Bay Devil Rays. That didn’t ring a bell either.

Has all this expansion and new stadiums made for better baseball? Not to an old fogy but then I’m not buying a ticket to sit so high up that even a score card doesn’t help tell the players.

Mr. O’Malley moved the Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles, not because he wasn’t making money but because he wasn’t making enough money; so much for fan loyalty. I had a colleague who came from Brooklyn and rooted for the L.A. Dodgers. How could he?

Thus Spake the Old Fogy, guessing that it’s all about the money.

Nov

28

Posted by : admin | On : November 28, 2008

The IRS decides to audit Grandpa, and summons him to the IRS office. The IRS auditor was not surprised when Grandpa showed up with his attorney. The auditor said, “Well, sir, you have an extravagant lifestyle and no full-time employment, which you explain by saying that you win money by gambling. I’m not sure the IRS finds that believable.” I’m a great gambler, and I can prove it,” says Grandpa. “How about a demonstration?” The auditor thinks for a moment and said, “Ok. Go ahead.” The Grandpa says, “I’ll bet you a thousand dollars that I can bite my own eye.” The auditor thinks for a moment and says, “It’s a bet.” Grandpa removes his glass eye and bites it. The auditor’s jaw drops. Grandpa says, “Now, I’ll bet you two thousand dollars that I can bite my other eye.” Now the auditor can tell Grandpa isn’t blind, so he takes the bet. Grandpa removes his dentures and bites his good eye. The stunned auditor now realizes he has wagered and lost three grand, with Grandpa’s attorney as a witness. He starts to get nervous. “Want to go double or nothing?” Grandpa ask, “I’ll bet you six thousand dollars that I can stand on one side of your desk, and pee into the wastebasket on the other side, and never get a drop anywhere in between.” The auditor, twice burned, is cautious now, but he looks carefully and decides there’s no way this old guy could possibly manage that stunt, so he agrees again. Grandpa stands behind the desk and unzips his pants, but although he stains mightily, he can’t make the stream reach the wastebasket on the other side, so he pretty much urinates all over the auditor’s desk.
The auditor leaps with joy, realizing that he has just turned a major loss into a huge win. But Grandpa’s attorney moans and puts his head in his hands. “Are you OK?” the auditor asks? “Not really,” says the attorney. “This morning when Grandpa told me he’d been summoned for an audit, he bet me twenty-five thousand that he could come in here and pee all over your desk and that you’d be happy about it.” DON’T UNDERESTIMATE US OLD GUYS

A young couple moves into a new neighborhood. The next morning while they are eating breakfast, the young woman sees her neighbor hanging the wash outside. That laundry is not very clean”, she said. “She doesn’t know how to wash correctly, perhaps she needs better laundry soap.” Her husband looked on, but remained silent. Every time her neighbor would hang her wash to dry, the young woman would make the same comment. About one month later, the woman was surprised to see a nice clean wash on the line and said to her husband: “Look, she has learned how to wash correctly. I wonder who taught her this?” The husband said, “I got up early this morning and cleaned our windows.”
And so it is with life. What we see when watching others depends on the purity of the window through which we look.

HOW TO STAY YOUNG
Try everything twice. On one woman’s tombstone she said she wanted this epitaph: Tried everything twice

Nov

28

Posted by : admin | On : November 28, 2008


Memorial services for Thomas Clinton Joiner, 83, Tool, will be held at a later date under the direction of Gordon-Foster-Brown Funeral Home.
Mr. Joiner was born April 11, 1925, in Mississippi to Sarah Jane and Ezra Elias Joiner and died Nov. 18, 2008, at ETMC in Tyler.
Survivors include his son Thomas M. Joiner, Smith County; sister Gloria Goforth, Bullard; and niece Judy Joiner, Tool.