Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008


Services for Henry Bonner Poole, 94 of Malakoff, were held 10 a.m. Thursday, July 10, 2008, at First United Methodist Church, Malakoff with Zeth Smith and Charles Kimble officiating. Burial followed in the Malakoff City Cemetery.
He passed away on July 8, 2008, at Hospice of East Texas in Tyler.
He was born Sept. 3, 1913, in Guy, Ark., to James and Norma Poole. He has lived in Malakoff for the past 58 years and was the owner and operator of Poole Gas Company.
He is survived by his wife of over 71 years, Margaret Derden Poole of Malakoff; son, Johnny and his wife Melinda Poole, Malakoff; daughter, Virginia and husband Charles Morman, Malakoff; daughter, D’Anna and husband Dr. Paul Wick, Tyler; sisters, Bronnie Parton, Malakoff, Evelyn Wyatt, Lakeland, Fla.; brother, Ray Poole, St. Louis, Mo.; 10 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation was held Wednesday July 9, 2008, from 6-8 p.m. at Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.
Pallbearers were Mark Morman, Lance Morman, Steve Wick, Dr. Jeff Wick, Drew Boring, Joshua Reed, Jon Yoder
In lieu of flowers, the family request donations be made to Hospice of East Texas, 4111 University Blvd. Tyler, TX 75701.
Under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

Well, I’m not the only one dying from heat. More and more are inside near a fan drinking ice water, the only suitable, healthful quencher. Cities around me can have 90 percent-off sales, but I’m not moving.

Mary Lou Hines had non-serious neck surgery two weeks ago; we hope she is doing all right.

In the paper I read of the death of one of the Malakoff Jordan boys and didn’t realize only boys were in that family. The first baby born to the parents was a girl who died at birth. The parents’ murder on Highway 31 in their store is still unsolved. Trinidad has unsolved murders, too. They are from so long ago, many do not even realize they happened. Marcus Jordan, the oldest of the sons, married Becky Shrader. She attended THS for awhile. Now the Jordans are friends with Ray and Gerry Sullivan of Mabank. Ray graduated with me from THS; his wife sells real estate. Gerry was originally a Taaffe. She and Ray lived in Tool for many years and now have a new home in the heart of Mabank.

I see so many women walking with canes. By the way the cane goes with the good leg I’ve been told. My day is coming. Then my husband said his hip is bothering him. He thinks if he lives long enough, he’ll need a hip replacement. I suppose I could get knee replacements at the same time, but he probably wouldn’t want me in the same room with him. We owe our many years together to going our own way mostly, doing what each likes. I have never fished. He hates to shop and naps in the car while I do the buying of our clothes. Some day he’ll thank me.

If my day for the cane arrives, I’ll have some of varied colors to match my clothes. This type of writing is called “jumping around, not staying with one subject.”

Well, our Trinidad cafe is gone. I heard the electrical bill was really sky-high and made the owners sick.

We did not celebrate the Fourth of July except in a mental way. The fireworks in Athens and at Tom Finley Park were reportedly spectacular. A granddaughter, 6, called from Addison, of Dallas where she was watching a show. She wanted me to go outside so I could see the pretty lights.

One year, my husband and I slipped off to Dallas for a free show near the downtown arena. Randy Travis sang his full hour although he was late. I would have given up my shoes for a glass of water, but the fireworks were unbelievable – faces, cars, colors, unimaginable images far up in the sky. They might have been seen from Trinidad. I have witnessed the great northern lights on an October night right after sundown, and I am not whistling Dixie or anything other tune.

Remember in your prayers all our soldiers, our hungry children, our abused children, our unloved children who are killed by their so-called protectors. Then on the list of ailing are Lena Goodenough, Martha Perry, Roberta Staples, Louise Fugate, Chester Bradley, Bobby Rounsavall, Elizabeth Paschall, Roselee Loven, Denise Loven, Helen Airheart.

Those in facilities or at home who are taking life easier include Merle Estes, Gertrude Stanfield, Joe Mosier, Lawrence Mosier, Fran Edgar, Lorene Jackson, Raymond Tubbs, Grady Tubbs, Joel and Barbara Ardoin, Frances Humphrey, and, of course, those I never remember at the time I’m typing

A vacant house on my street by the railroad tracks, after a loooooong time of work by the family and professionals, is about to be livable. The inside is completely redone. The house will probably stay in the family for years to come as the parents may live here first, but the grown children enjoy having some place in the country to visit. These are relatives of Chelsea Lundy who with her family lives next door on the west.

There is still continual work going on with the Trinidad tracks. Train traffic is said to start coming and going at twice the rate before as rail shipping is cheaper than trucking. Oh, for that old Depot I once visited to sit with friends on the ledges or docks.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

The possibility of selling beer and wine in Malakoff has been raised.

The group Malakoff Citizens for Economic Growth has started the process to try and call an election in November on the following issues:

- For/Against: “The legal sale of beer and wine for off-premise consumption only.”

- For/Against: “The legal sale of mixed beverages in restaurants by food and beverage certificate holders only.”
The group has already taken the first steps, said Malakoff Citizens for Economic Growth treasurer Randy Norwood. An application containing the signatures of 10 of the city

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

The city of Malakoff looked to nearby Mabank to fill its director of public works opening.

On Monday, the City Council hired Mabank Assistant Public Works Director Timothy Whitley to take over the department.
“We are very pleased to hire (Whitley),” said Mayor Pat Isaacson. “He comes to us with a lot of experience. He understands all the things that need to be done by a public works director. I think every citizen will be pleased with him.”

Whitley will earn $53,000 a year and is scheduled to start on Monday, July 14. {{more}}

Whitley takes the place of Glen Herriage, who left Malakoff for the Athens director of utilities job. Herriage had been the Malakoff public works director for nearly 10 years and was also the co-city administrator, a job he shared with city secretary Ann Barker.

Whitley does not hold that title, leaving Barker the only city administrator.

Whitley has been with the city of Mabank for the past 12 years, working his way up through the ranks.

He is going to have to hit the ground running since the same day he was hired also saw the Texas Department of Transportation inform Malakoff it has to move its sewer and water lines on Highway 198 near the Caney City bridge.

The action is connected with the project to raise the bridge.

“We are in their right-of-way, so we have to get out of there,” Isaacson said.

The work needs to be done by the end of August.

The mayor said that the good news is that the city can do much of the work, but the project is still going to cost the city approximately $30,000. Isaacson said that money would be for materials, time and the directional boring required.

Isaacson said she wasn

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Pearl Cantrell

ATHENS

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Barbara Gartman

Without a police force since mid-June, Log Cabin has reloaded its police department with a new chief and patrolman.

Log Cabin lost its police chief, Chris Smoot, when he resigned because he wished to return to his hometown. His last day was June 19.

The city

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

A State Office of Administrative Hearings (SOAH) judge last month denied a request for interim rates by customers of Monarch Utilities, Inc., according to a state official.
But protesters still have options.

A spokeswoman for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) last week verified Judge William Newchurch denied the request for interim rates. That request came during an April preliminary hearing on the Monarch water rate case in Austin. {{more}}

But Andrea Morrow of the TCEQ said that former agency director Glenn Shankle sent a separate request for interim rates to the SOAH.

“That request is based on different numbers and different criteria (from the customers

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

Residents of the Cedar Creek Lake area are organizing to protest a proposed sour gas well near Payne Springs that would tap into the Smackover zone far under the lake and transport the gas to a processing plant in Eustace.

A San Antonio oil company, BlackBrush Oil & Gas, has announced plans to file a permit with the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) to drill both horizontally and vertically under Cedar Creek Lake to a depth between 10,800 and 11,000 feet. A company spokesperson said they expect to find between 7 and 10 million barrels of oil with the well.

The Smackover zone is also known to contain large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas or oil mixed with 4 parts-per-million (ppm) or more of hydrogen sulfide is called “sour gas.” The area BlackBrush is aiming for could contain as much hydrogen sulfide as 200,000 ppm. {{more}}

Hydrogen sulfide is a highly toxic gas. Inhaling amounts as small as 500 to 800 parts-per-million (ppm) can cause death.

The planned BlackBrush well – and the approximately two-mile pipeline to the processing plant – is adjacent to densely populated areas such as Payne Springs, Enchanted Oaks and several subdivisions.

According to critics of the plan, a catastrophic accident at the well site could include cities from Seven Points and Gun Barrel City to Malakoff and Trinidad in the radius of hydrogen sulfide exposure.

And that is why protesters are up in arms.

“I’m not against exploration and exploitation of gas,” said DeWayne Varnadore, an oil and gas attorney. “I am against the close proximity of so many residents to a facility like this.”
Varnadore was speaking at an informational meeting for the newly formed Friends of Cedar Creek Lake at Star Harbor City Hall last Saturday.

Protesters have organized quickly. A website dedicated to the issue – www.cclfriends.com – went live Monday and features the latest news, who to contact, and a sample letter to send to state officials.

Varnadore and Galen Hartman, laboratory director for Chemical Analysis, Inc. in Irving and a key player the 1997 fight against a sour gas well in Tool, listed three main areas for action at the current time:

1. Show up at the Payne Springs City Council meeting that was scheduled for Monday night (June 30) to support that city extending its oil and gas drilling ordinance to include its extraterritorial jurisdiction.

2. Write letters to state officials and the RRC asking for a public hearing on the drilling permit. Varnadore said to “deluge” officials with letters and turn the permit into a political issue.

3. Convince landowners with mineral rights between the BlackBrush well site and the lake to not sell their rights.
Mark No. 1 off the list. According Sheila Bacon of the Friends of Cedar Creek Lake, Payne Springs approved extending its oil and gas drilling ordinance. The city also plans to hold a public meeting on the well issue at a later date.

As for letters, last Thursday the Enchanted Oaks City Council met – with several area mayors and property owners’ association presidents in attendance – to approve a letter addressed to John Tintera in Austin, assistant director of technical permitting for the RRC.

The letter requests a public hearing on the issue to be held in the area before a drilling permit is issued. The letter also points out the area’s limited escape routes, should a catastrophic event occur.

“My concern is there is only one road of escape, and that’s State Highway 198,” Enchanted Oaks Mayor Don Warner said.
“If it is exposed to lethal levels of poisonous gas, the residents of Enchanted Oaks would be trapped,” he pointed out. “Our only escape route is over the water.”

“The health and safety of Enchanted Oaks residents is my number one concern,” Warner added.

Varnadore said unless residents can force a hearing, BlackBrush will not have to file its emergency plans in the case of an accident until after the well is drilled.

“In this circumstance they have the cart before the horse,” he said.

The last step is a little more difficult. Varnadore said a company known only as BBII has been buying subsurface locations between the well site and the lake. If the people owning those mineral rights can be convinced to not sell, BlackBrush’s drilling path can be cut off.

Judge David Holstein is expected to speak on the BlackBrush issue at the next meeting of the Henderson County Property Owners Association 7 p.m. Thursday, July 10. Meetings are held at the Lakeview Lodge in Athens, located on FM 2485 just 7/10ths of a mile from Wal-Mart on Highway 31.



Pearl Cantrell contributed to this article.



www.blackbrushenergy.com
www.cclfriends.com

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

From Staff Reports

A Kemp man accepted a life sentence without the possibility of parole last week rather than face the chance of the death penalty in connection with last year’s death of a Tool 2-year-old.

Michael Lyndon Whitman accepted the plea agreement in 3rd District Judge Mark Calhoon’s court last Friday. Whitman had been charged with capital murder for the death of Malaki Overturf.

If convicted at trial, Whitman could have been sentenced to death. {{more}}

According to the charge read by Calhoon, Whitman killed the child by smothering, strangling or striking his body against an object on Oct. 25, 2007.

Tool police responded to a 911 call that day around 9:30 p.m., according to police reports.

When officers arrived, Tina Smith, the boy’s grandmother met authorities and indicated her grandson was dead and in the house.

Police entered the house and found the child in the living room being held by Whitman. Reports said the child appeared to have bruises, contusions and ligature marks on his body.
At the time, police called Whitman the child’s caretaker.

During last week’s court proceeding, Whitman’s mother, Lynn Whitman, was arrested for disorderly conduct after listening to statements read by the victim’s parents, Michael Dick and Mrs. Overturf. Mrs. Whitman had requested to speak after the statements were made, but the judge denied her request, and she continued to raise her voice in the courtroom.

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

From Staff Reports

ATHENS – About 200 people attended the Henderson County Peace Officers annual Memorial Tuesday at the northwest corner of the Courthouse Square.

The event, usually held mid-May, was postponed a month due to the trial of Randall Wayne Mays, who was found guilty of capitol murder of two sheriff’s deputies last year.
Their names – Paul S. Habelt and Tony P. Ogburn – were added to the list of those killed in the line of duty on the wall of honor, joining the names of Charlie Fields Sr., K.C. Winn, Larry Hopson and Bernie Everett. {{more}}

Their widows, Pat Ogburn and Nita Habelt, placed the memorial wreath in their honor.

Peace Officers Association president Deputy Sheriff Billy Jack Valentine said as a youth he looked up to many of the men whose names are now on the wall of honor.

Third District Court Judge Mark Calhoun gave the keynote address.

He spoke of the video tape played during the Mays trial of the conversation between officers and Mays in trying to persuade him to come quietly.

“I was absolutely blown away by the level of competence and professionalism shown on that day,” he said.

“I was especially struck by the comment made by Deputy Tony Ogburn to Randall Mays. He said, ‘Isn’t this a beautiful day?’” Calhoun said.

Ogburn, Habelt and Valentine were among the officers responding to a domestic disturbance call near Payne Springs, just hours after last year’s peace officer memorial service.

“Today, we honor their service and take pride in all of their stories,” Calhoun said.

Also honored with their names added to the wall as law enforcement members who have died were past Malakoff Police Chief George M. Corn, who succumbed to cancer in 2004 and Dr. Nolen D. Geddie, a one time Henderson County Constable and staunch supporter of law enforcement, who died this year of cancer.

The list of the fallen include W.C. Perryman, Leon Cain, Dale Bryce, W.C. Fladd, Don Bettencourt, Jack Terrell, Bill Bearden, Ralph M. Reaves, Bennie C. Krueger, Tommy Smith, Herman Kite, Jr., Kipper Hartline, Don W McCord, J.W. Brownlow, Jack Sims, Frank E. LaRue Jr., Stephen L. Combs, Mack Wallace, Thomas C. Underhill, Janey M. Reed, T.E. Williams, Jim Billings, Don Johnson, L.D. Brookshire, David Harris and Daner Stanberry.