Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008


American Legion Plans Big Day for Athens on July 4th

By Britt Thompson and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Thursday, June 29, 1922

The American Legion Post of Athens is planning a big celebration for July 4th, and a cordial invitation is extended to each and every one to come and enjoy the day.

Governor Pat M. Neff is to arrive in Athens on July 3rd and will be met at the station by Captain Pickens and an escort of the Howitzer Company, National Guard. He will then go to the home of Judge Watkins, where he will spend the night.

Governor Neff will speak at the court house at 11 o

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

I used to believe that prostitutes in the old west were not poorly treated. Then I visited the graveyard in Tombstone, Arizona where a lot of the women are listed on their tombstones as suicides.
It caught my eye because I had never seen suicide on a tombstone before … of a man or woman.
I can think of a couple of reasons why a woman’s death might be called suicide, neither of which is pleasant. The lives of women in general in the old west may not have been all that great.
It came to me that my opinion had been formed by watching movies about the old west. Marlene Dietrich was my archetype of an old west prostitute.
I wonder what other things I think I “know” are really Hollywood inventions.
Speaking of movies I saw a movie about three teams who were trying to climb Mt. Everest. There were men and women involved. The climbers were from all over the world.
I won’t go into the grim details but many died and many of those that survived lost hands and feet. It was a truly an experience of extreme hardship. But there were a few that made it to the top and came back alive.
It occurred to me that no other animals do things like climb Mt. Everest. Nor do they do aerobics, or pump iron, or drive racecars, or ride roller coasters or put their lives in danger just for the thrill of it. People go to great expense to put there lives in danger. Climbing Mt. Everest is not cheap.
I suppose that one could say that other animals make music. For example crickets, frogs, loons, dolphins, whales

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

I can’t seem to find any jokes that are funny – so let’s have some inspiration from the Bible. The next time you feel that God can’t use you, just remember:
- Noah was a drunk
- Abraham was too old
- Isaac was a daydreamer
- Jacob was a liar
- Leah was ugly
- Joseph was abused
- Moses had a stuttering problem
- Gideon was afraid
- Sampson had long hair and was a womanizer
- Rahab was a prostitute
- Jeremiah and Timothy were too young
- David had an affair and was a murderer
- Elijah was suicidal
- Isaiah preached naked
- Jonah ran from God
- Naomi was a widow
- Job went bankrupt
- John the Baptist ate bugs
- Peter denied Christ
- The disciples fell asleep while praying
- Martha worried about everything
- The Samaritan woman was divorced, more than once
- Zaccheus was too small
- Paul was too religious
- Timothy had an ulcer
- AND, Lazarus was dead!
No more excuses now! God can use you to your full potential. Besides you aren’t the message, you are just the messenger.

OK, back to funny!
Father, to young lawyer daughter: “Why do you think your job is shaky? I thought you said they just put your name on the door.” – “They did,” she said, “but they wrote in in pencil.”

The young woman offered to care for the 8-year-old daughter of her next door neighbor. She arrived in time to prepare breakfast, laying a generous helping of bacon and eggs in front of the child.
“Mother always has hot biscuits for breakfast,” said the child. So the woman, anxious to oblige, hurried into the kitchen and quickly prepared a plate of hot biscuits, which she laid in front of the girl. “No thank you,” she said.
“But I thought you said your mother always has hot biscuits for breakfast?” asked the woman.
“She does,” said the child, “but I don’t eat ‘em.”

Thomas Anderson’s 5-year-old son came running into the house yelling, “There’s a lion in the basement! There’s a lion in the basement!” – His father said, “Son, you know there isn’t a lion in the basement. And I know there isn’t a lion in the basement, and what’s more, just to prove it to you, I’m going down into the basement empty handed.”
Thomas Anderson would have been 38 next Tuesday.

A church member and a new visitor were discussing the new pastor just after his first sermon. “Why did you ask the other preacher to resign?” the visitor asked.
“Oh,” said the member, “he always preached that if we didn’t mend our ways, we would all go to hell.”
“But,” said the visitor, “that is just what this preacher said today.”
“I know,” was the reply. “But the other preacher acted as if he was glad of it.”

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008


A memorial service for Greg Wagner, 20, Seven Points, was held June 20, at Christian Life Center Church with the Rev. Barry Boatright officiating.
Mr. Wagner was born March 31, 1988, in Dallas and died June 16, 2008, in Gun Barrel City.
Previously of Balch Springs, he had resided in Seven Points for the past six years. He was a carpenter and had attended Mesquite and Mabank schools.
Survivors include his parents Susan and Frank Wagner, Seven Points; sisters Angela Peeler and husband Doug, Austin; Jessica Sutton, Balch Springs; brother Thomas Cline, Seven Points; grandmother Linda Jordan, Balch Springs; cousin Lori Sutton, Seven Points; other family members and many friends.

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008


Carol W. Richardson, 76, formerly of Malakoff, passed away on Wednesday, May 14, 2008, at her home in Grants Pass, Ore.
She was born on April 14, 1932, in Mountville, Pa., to Logan and Emma Woodworth. Mrs. Richardson worked for the Armstrong Cork Company for many years in Lancaster, Pa. She and her husband, Dale, who survives, were long-time residents of Cedar Creek Lake. Mrs. Richardson was instrumental in the founding of the Henderson County Republican Women’s Club. She, with others, set up all the Republican polling places in Henderson County. Mrs. Richardson was extremely active in the Athens Little Theatre, both performing and directing many performances. She loved the theatre, music, animals and boating.
Survivors include her husband, Dale Richardson, of Grants Pass; three daughters, Katie Lind, of Twain Harte, Calif.; Heidi Darling, of Grants Pass; and Robin Richardson, of Blythe, Calif.; son Guy Richardson, of Valley Glenn, Calif.; five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.
Mrs. Richardson is preceded in death by her son, Kris Weber.
A memorial service will be held in July 2008.

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008


Gertie Marie Amrein, 87, of Seven Points, died Wednesday, June 18, 2008, in Athens.
She was born March 26, 1921, in Duncan, Okla., daughter of the late James Monroe and Helen E. Jones.
She was a homemaker and member of Seven Points Church of Christ.
Surviving are her husband, Charles Troy Amrein of Tool; daughter, Patricia Gayle Amrein of Tool; grandson, Michael Lynn Amrein; five great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by parents, James and Helen Jones; brothers, Donald E., J.M. Jr. and Billie Dale Jones, all of Norman, Okla.; son, Harold Lynn Amrein and daughter, Carolyn Sue Amrein of Arlington.
Services were held at Seven Points Church of Christ 2 p.m. Sunday, June 22, 2008, with Buck Griffith and Leon McManus officiating, under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home Seven Points.
Interment followed in the Moore Memorial Gardens, Arlington, Texas, Monday, June 23.

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

I don’t have a picture for you this week. I could show you a photo of my grandson Beau’s beautiful wedding, but you’ve all seen plenty of pictures of beautiful weddings. I could show you a photo of him puckering up like a baby with tears running down his cheeks during the ceremony, he was so overcome with emotion, but I think that might embarrass him.
I wish I had a picture of Beau and a classmate from opera school singing Happy Birthday to me in operatic Italian at the rehearsal dinner. I wish I had a recording of it. It was beautiful.
Daughter Liz, granddaughter Taegan, and I motored up to Little Rock for the event. We motored back at a very leisurely pace, stopping at garage sales and second hand shops, finding some good books for my new career of selling books on the Internet.
There were several nervous moments as the newly weds were departing for their honeymoon in Jamaica. In the first place, Beau’s dad, Sonny had bought the plane tickets, and somehow thought he had them departing from Little Rock the morning after the wedding. Instead, he had them departing Dallas at that time. He discovered this too late to change tickets.
Luckily, Bro. Phil Greenawalt, the hugely popular former pastor of Dogwood Baptist Church south of Athens, was there to help. He is now pastor of the church where Beau’s mother goes to church – Winnsboro, I think. He volunteered to drive them – in the very early morning hours – to DFW. Everything was going great until Bro. Phil’s car broke down somewhere near wherever it is he is pastor. So he just called and woke up some members of his flock and told them God had a mission of mercy for them. Don’t get dressed up, don’t put on makeup, just come quick, he told them. And they did. The kids made it to their flight. Then they got a nice surprise that made up for some of their trials: They got bumped up to First Class seating. All that will be a nice story to tell their grandkids. And everybody else in between.
Speaking of pictures, I should have made a picture of my giant zucchini, but it’s too late now. Half of it made up the major part of dinner for my friend Carl and me. I am not exaggerating, and Carl will back me up – that thing was as large as my upper arm. If I had seen it before I would have never let it get that big. I didn’t think it would be good, but it was delicious saut

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

Of course, it’s too hot here, but nature is still abashed in luscious green. We don’t know for how long.

News comes that Bobby Rounsavall, married to Ann (Bradshaw), is undergoing chemotherapy for a small place in his lung. Not much else is known except the couple was out west when Bobby became ill. They may have gone to M.D. Anderson next, but I’m not sure where they are at the time. Their son Chad lives in Mansfield.

The Ardoins are taking it easy. Barbara has not worked in over a month because of problems with one leg which will give way at inopportune times. Joel has a serious stress test coming up at ETMC in Athens. This couple of 10 has a new great-granddaughter. She was born to the daughter of Susie Colvin. The late Freddie Colvin lived to see his first grandson.

Nell Moore has written a friend from the facility she and Houston are somewhere in Nebraska. She said she was homesick and missed everyone.

Those of us from the X Generation of that period between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boomers find life is too complicated. For example, try learning the cell-phone numbers for extended family members. Parents are buying these for junior-high age and up to reach the children or vice versa.

I found an old page of a 1954 Trinidad phone book.
For “D,” the information went like this: Daniel Sales Co 4451; Daniel T S r 2441; Daniel Warren r 2544; Dulaney Frank E 4394; Dunn W P r 2264.

I still remember our home number, 4012. It’s imbedded somewhere forever. I wonder how many phone numbers my family has had in 48 years.

Here it is the end of June and July 4 on the way. More stores close for holidays now it seems with the war still going on. I did not mean to start anything up about politics. Vice president choices are going to be important to me. That’s all I’ll say.

The Trinidad Cafe has closed and left another empty building on Highway 31. The support was not enough for the place to make enough profit. I feel bad about it. My husband is diabetic, and I’m borderline. We eat crazy food which the spouse loses weight on, and I don’t.

Out-of-towners may not know that on the road to Kemp, past Seven Points, a modern-type apartment complex, really large, has been built on the west side of the road. I know what a one-bedroom setup costs now just in case. What I really want to know is if the lake can be seen from the second or third floor. Another complex for the east side advertised and graded land for something known as the Seabird or whatever, but nothing has gone up for residence

Mary Nell and Mondo Renteria live in a new section of nice homes to the south of King’s Country Club. I went to see her asking a neighbor if he knew where DeeDee might live. He said no DeeDee lived in that area, but she does. Everyone doesn’t know her nickname. Her sister Sandra coined it. Betty and Barry Hayes, the third sister and oldest, live near Lake Travis to the west of Austin. I’m impressing myself throwing these directions around when I can turn a block and not know north from south. I passed that skill on to my middle daughter.

Lauretta Lawler looks forward to July because she hopes to go to Frisco at some point to stay with Melissa Renteria Fann, her granddaughter, as she has her second baby boy. Lauretta is showing off a sonogram, a special kind that shows the face of the unborn baby, really clear. He’s a doll.

Norman Lawler’s sister Barbara and husband Dale Wier are moving here in July. The Wolf house Tommy and family lived in is being reworked and will be the home of a Dallas dental professional and her young son. The house can’t be recognized from the inside, and many of the windows have been removed. At least it won’t be empty.

In Frisco lives my youngest son, who along with his wife are now the parents of a boy to go along with their two daughters. This is our 11th grandchild, surely the last. I hope the baby’s picture turns out in this publication.

I see college boys or those home on leave for many reasons in town running or riding bicycles to keep in shape. Preschoolers are soon to register for the fall, if not already. Then there will be volleyball and football activities which will involve many of us too old to do much, but we’ll be at the games if there is a way.

Football is still the favorite around here even; we did lose a slew of seniors. One grandson played all four years. His granddad played on the first six-man football team in 1954. It was quite a thrill and surprise to see the grandson play. One son and his family moved here. Both grandchildren in the family have played sports we played, plus cousins, even their late granddad whom they never knew. Basketball was my game, and I’m not sure we ever won a game, but we loved our coach, Mr. Kirksey, and have good memories of riding a bus, especially over that old bridge to Kemp.

Terry Fleming gave me a baseball picture when here for his mother’s funeral. In the picture, which I’ll try to get printed, are Jimmy Mayo, Don Wilbanks, Larry Stanfield, Butch Ridgeway, one of the Kirksey boys, and many more, some identified, some not. The age looks about eight, and there are over 20 of them.

Remember those on prayer lists: Denise Loven, Roselee Loven, Chester Bradley, Louise McGee Fugate, Roberta Staples, Fran Edgar, Martha Perry, Geraldine Stanfield, Cleora Fleming, Gertrude Stanfield, Lorene Jackson, Lena Goodenough, Keith Ayers, Bro. Wilbanks, the E.L. Penningtons, Lorene Jackson, Joe Mosier, Lawrence Mosier, Merle Estes, Helen Airheart, Evelyn Beavers, Raymond Tubbs, Frances Humphrey, and many more. Please remember our service men and women and the hunger in this country and around the world.


Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

Jun

26

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : June 26, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

If Star Harbor officials want to talk about their city’s current sewer contract with the City of Malakoff, they can start by coming before the City Council.

So said the Malakoff City Council.

During a special meeting Tuesday night covering a number of topics, City Council members unanimously rejected the idea of appointing a liaison to renegotiate the contract.

Councilwoman Jeannette King was absent from the meeting.
“I am reluctant about committees,” said Mayor Pro-tem Tim Trimble. “Things get done behind closed doors.” {{more}}

The current contract — which Malakoff council members feel shortchanges the city — was approved in 1986 and runs through 2016. That contract, however, limits Star Harbor to 1 million gallons a month averaged over the months of January, February and March. Star Harbor was under the limit for this year, but has been over the 1 million gallon mark at least four times in the past, according to figures provided by Malakoff.

When Trimble asked Mayor Pat Isaacson why the contract needed to be renegotiated, Isaacson said Star Harbor asked for it because officials in that city had to declare a moratorium on sewer hookups because of the limit.

“Oh well,” Trimble replied. “They need to come talk to us as a council as a whole.”

Trimble added that his concern was being ready for the future growth of Malakoff.

“We have to think what Malakoff is going to do if the population increases,” he said, adding that he believed there was a chance a resurgence of the coal industry in the area could spark a growth spurt in the city.

Cancelled meeting
On Wednesday morning, Star Harbor Mayor Duane Smith said he actually did try and meet with the Malakoff City Council.
“When I was elected mayor (in May), one of the very first things I did was to physically show up at Mayor Isaacson’s Community Center office, I introduced myself and requested a general introductory meeting with a few of her council people so we could try and put issues on the table,” Smith said. “Not just the sewage system. The sewage system is just one of our opportunities. There are other opportunities out there for (both cities).

“These two cities are inextricably linked and should be using their God-given talents – and there’s a lot of that – working together,” Smith said.

Isaacson verified an afternoon meeting for Monday, June 9, was scheduled and posted at Malakoff City Hall. The meeting was cancelled that morning, however, because Malakoff City Council could not get a quorum.

Smith said he certainly understood the quorum issue, however, as soon as the meeting was cancelled he said he “immediately turned around and pressed for when we could reschedule. And to date I haven’t gotten it rescheduled.”

Because Malakoff has had troubles getting its entire council together, former Co-City Administrator Glen Herriage added the agenda item regarding a liaison which was defeated Tuesday night.

Unfair contract
Malakoff council members were also not happy with the money in the current contract. According to Co-City Administrator Ann Barker, Star Harbor is currently paying $1,125 per month for its sewer service.

“I remember the formula (for the cost) was very complicated, and for years (the city) not getting what we were owed,” said Councilwoman Eva Wright.

“That’s right,” said Herriage, who was sitting in the audience.

Councilwoman Jerrilyn Tarver said, “They need us. We need to put our expectations on the table.”
Tarver didn’t leave much doubt over how she felt about the current contract when she said, “They’ve taken us for a ride for 22 years.”

Wednesday, Smith pointed out Star Harbor has offered more money.

Earlier this year, Star Harbor proposed a new contract that included adding a meter to the sewer line to measure the actual amount of sewage being sent to Malakoff — rather than using an estimate based on water sales — and adding $150 per month for depreciation.

In addition, just like the original contract the proposed contract included Star Harbor paying Malakoff 10 percent of the operation and maintenance costs of the plant, plus a 1 percent administration fee.

After Herriage and Isaacson met with Star Harbor officials during an April meeting, Malakoff turned down the contract.
In a letter to Star Harbor, Herriage said Malakoff will be glad to look at a new contract “when it addresses and includes infrastructure expansion for the maximum expected capacity, incentives to reduce the amount of infiltration and inflow, plans to reduce septic conditions, and fees based on actual amount of metered readings.”

The April meeting between city officials later caused tension in the Malakoff City Council when some council members learned of the contract proposal from reading The Malakoff News. None of the council members agreed with the terms of the proposed contract — a point reiterated Tuesday night — they just wanted it brought before the council.

In the meantime, Smith said, Star Harbor has been trying to take care of business. He said in addition to more money in the contract, Star Harbor has already started a program of smoke testing home septic systems to cut down on infiltration and inflow.

“This is one of the things that they want,” he said. “(The letter) said this is one of the things the City of Malakoff wants. I can’t control Mayor Isaacson’s council. I can’t listen to two different messages.”

Smith said he is ready to work with the City of Malakoff, a point echoed by Isaacson.

“There is no advantage to me, or no warm feeling I get out of slamming Malakoff or Malakoff City Council,” Smith said. “That is not my intent or interest. But I do have to have marching orders I can understand and follow.”

To add to the debate, Malakoff resident Peggy Dewberry addressed the council at the end of the meeting about the sewer smell on the west side of Malakoff. She said sometimes the smell was so strong it came into the houses.
“We’re told it’s because of the contract with Star Harbor,” she said, adding she was told the city could do nothing about the smell.

Isaacson agreed and said she was told “it has to do with how they (Star Harbor) send their gray water.” Isaacson said the smell issue would be a part of any renegotiation of the contract.

But if the contract isn’t renegotiated, “we are going to have to smell this until 2016,” said Dewberry.

“The people on the west end are getting the bad deal,” she said. “They (council members) were saying we are in the driver’s seat, but I don’t know.”