Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009


Services for Albert Lawson Hendrix, 80, Tool, were held Feb. 7, 2009, at the Eubank Memorial Chapel with Jerry Rains officiating. Burial was in Tool Cemetery under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home in Mabank.
Hendrix was born Aug. 26, 1928, in Tool and died Feb. 3, 2009, in Athens.
He was preceded in death by his parents Christen and Otto Hendrix and a brother Fred Hendrix.
He was employed in communications and was retired from the U.S. Army. He was a lifetime resident of Tool and a member of the Styx Church of Christ.
Survivors include his wife June Hendrix, Tool; sister Peggy Killen and husband Vernon, Tool; nephew Mark Hunter, Tool; nieces Vickie Wells, Mabank; Lisa Stinnett, Mabank; and Christy Scherer of Illinois.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009


Services for Jo Wanda “Jodie” Owens, 74, of Malakoff were held 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 7, 2009, at Malakoff Church of Christ with Minister Lavelle Layfield officiating, under the direction of Eubank Funeral Home, Canton. Burial was in Grapeland Cemetery, Houston County.
She passed away Feb. 5, 2009, in Athens. Mrs. Owens was born June 13, 1934, in Quinland.
She is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law Kenneth P. ‘Chuck’ and Jeanie Owens of Malakoff, Danny Ray and Kim Owens of Lubbock; daughter and son-in-law Sharon Fay and Herman McDonald of Mobile, Ala.; eight grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren; brother and sister-in-law Robby and Camie Miller of Wills Point; sister and brother-in-law Mary and Lawrence Widemon of Woodland Hills, Calif.
Pallbearers were David Fretwell, Larry Miller, William Miller, Kenneth Vance, Jerry Stice and Lance Decker.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009


Garry Q. Andrew, 51, of Malakoff, passed away Saturday, Feb. 7.
Mr. Andrews was preceded in death by his father, Aubrey L. Andrews of Mankin, Texas; his sister and three brothers.
He is survived by his mother, Bonnie Andrews of Malakoff; daughter, Rachel Francis of Trinidad; daughter, Angela Andrews of Malakoff; and two grandchildren.
Services are pending.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009


Services for Phillip Fredericke Aechternacht, 69, of Kemp, were scheduled for 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, at Aley United Methodist Church with the Rev. Eston Williams officiating, and under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home of Seven Points.
Mr. Aechternacht died Monday, Feb. 9, 2009, in Athens. He was born Jan. 30, 1940, in Corsicana to the late Albert Charles Aechternacht and Frances Layton.
He was a printer with Quebector of Dallas. He was a member of the American Legion Gun Barrel City, life time member of the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, Degree of Commissioner with the Boy Scouts, life time member with Order Of The Arrow, Doctor Hugh Brown Award 1998-1999.
Survivors include wife, Ernestine Allison Aechternacht; daughters, Elizabeth Aechternacht of Farmers Branch, Trisha and husband Randy Brady of Red Oak, Texas; sons, Chris Aechternacht of Farmers Branch, Mike Aechternacht of Red Oak; brothers, David and wife Jackie Aechternacht of Grand Prairie, Steven and wife Claudia Aechternacht of Spice Wood, Texas; sister, Gayle and husband Layton Bergman of Virginia; nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

I was always so-so about wine. I would take a glass at Thanksgiving dinner and leave most of it. As a teenager I drank it to get drunk, ditto beer and whisky but I never liked the taste of alcoholic beverages. A possible exception was a cold beer after mowing the lawn on a hot day.
I preferred a Coke to a highball. I preferred grape juice to wine.
We, wife and three kids, were visiting my folks in Tucson and we went on a picnic in the desert. Besides my family of five and my mom and dad there were recent acquaintances of my folks, a couple and their two daughters, one just into her teens, the other just before her teens. The wife was an anesthesiologist in the Bay Area.
The husband was a botanist at the University of California at Davis and had spent the previous year in France. His grant was to study why French wines have a better bouquet than California wines. In the course of this investigation he came into the possession of some very, very expensive wine. This is wine made from the last picking of the grapes when they are sweetest. Apparently these grapes are almost raisins.
I have had $30-$50 bottles of wine, I thought Mogen David tasted better, so I wasn’t really expecting much. When my dad unloaded the ice chest holding chilled wine glasses I should have known something was afoot.
Wow! This wine was really good, good beyond description, out of the park good. I couldn’t remember ever tasting anything better, before or since.
As the sun went down in the desert, sunset in the Sonoran desert is a little bit of heaven, the heat has faded to an enveloping cocoon of warmth and the sky becomes redder and redder until you can hardly stand it, we all sang “early Shells” while the older daughter strummed her guitar.
That picnic was as good as it gets.

My friend, Pete, from across the street had rebuilt the engine of my ’72 Ford Econoline and we had gone to the garage to put the engine back in the body. The garage was where the city garbage trucks, which were built by Mercedes, were worked on so it was a pretty nice garage. Pete’s daughter, Dana, about 9, came with us and kept the tools in their places and wiped free of grease and oil. Pete had been doing some welding and a clamp had gotten very hot. Unfortunately hot metal looks the same as cold metal and Dana got a pretty bad burn on her hand. She didn’t say a word about it until we were on the way home. That’s the way Dana was, a real brick.
On the way home we stopped at a Baskin-Robins on 4th Street and had banana splits all around. We sat at a table by a window that looked out on 4th Street, a burger joint and a Safeway parking lot. Across the street was a Laundromat, and on the corner was a closed Piggly Wiggly store, its boarded windows staring blankly into to the setting sun.
Every once in a while the Albuquerque sunset is golden. The sun, the sky, the very air is gold and streaked with golden rays in the breeze borne dust
Pete turns to his daughter and says, “Dana, it doesn’t get any better than this.”
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, sitting on the porch and watching the contrails that criss-cross the sky.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

From the mouths of children:
A 4-year-old child’s next door neighbor was an elderly gentleman who had recently lost his wife. Upon seeing the man cry, the little boy went into the old man’s yard, climbed onto his lap, and just sat there. When his mother asked him what he had said to the neighbor, the little boy just said, “Nothing, I just helped him cry.”

Teacher Debbie Moon’s first graders were discussing a picture of a family. One little boy in the picture had a different color than the other members. One of her students suggested he was adopted. A little girl said, “I know all about adoption, I was adopted.” – “What does it mean to be adopted?” asked another child. – “It means,” said the girl, “that you grew in your mommy’s heart instead of her tummy!”

On my way home one day, I stopped to watch a Little League baseball game that was being played in a park near my home. As I sat down behind the bench on the first-base line, I asked one of the boys what the score was. “We’re behind 14 to nothing,” he answered with a smile. – “Really,” I said. “I have to say you don’t look very discouraged.” – “Discouraged?” the boy asked with a puzzled look on his face. “Why should we be discouraged? We haven’t been up to bat yet.”

Whenever I’m disappointed with my spot in life, I stop and think about little Jamie Scott

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

With rain pelting the window and back yard, I feel snug and wish my coffee were hotter. We remain in a drought area which makes me shudder to think of July and August.

Water shortage is beginning to be an important item at all city council meetings. Some communities are safe; others are looking for answers; some feel panicky. Bottoms of well-known lakes across America are rising, shortening the depths of lakes, according to magazine reports like “The National Geographic.” I remember when as a child we caught rain in barrels. Is something wrong with that practice?

The race is on. Sign-ups are in schools and city halls for those interested in being part of running our little town. Two open spots are on the school board. Then in addition or in the same count, there has been a resignation with an appointee. Anyway school board seats will need to be filled.
Eric Airheart and Willie Lundy have terms expiring. All terms are volunteer basis.

At City Hall I read in another publication there will be a race for mayor and two council people; the incumbents will choose to run again or not – Mary Ellen Johnston and Brent Nolan.
Years ago, Mary Ellen was married to the late Milburn Johnston, a cousin to Lee Nolan, Brent’s dad. Fred and Dessie Johnston were Milburn’s parents. Christine and Russell Nolan were Lee’s parents.

My mother liked to tell me about families in the past who were connected, in the present too. Before long, my head would be spinning trying to put limbs on the right place on a tree. Now as I age, I can do the same with names of people we know. One connection I have never made with my family name of Stanfield to another. But in the beginning, some of the couples here had ten or more children. Eventually, life is going to get complicated.

And have I mentioned lately how many men here were born in Kerens and traveled east to find wives and stayed.

Varsity basketball teams will be wrapping up the basic season this week. Playoffs for the qualified start soon after. Coaches Kevin Ray, Kendra McAlister, and Jay Puemple have had busy seasons.

Joel Ardoin has been out and in and around town. He has a smile.

Jack Cooley is still taking chemo or other treatments.

Toni Steele continues her regime of preventive treatments following her surgery.

Many school children have the old-time flu.

Rosy Sims is a new neighbor in town, at 610 W. Lawrence. She comes from the Houston area and is adjusting to the new type of air problems. She is a widow, a mother (Randy Sims) and the grandmother of Kimmy Sims and Samantha Sims enrolled in school. Mary Sims is Randy’s wife. The couple usually can be found at the girls’ basketball games as Kim is a team member.

Those needing prayers as they stay in their homes with assistance include Earl and Russell Yates, Louise Fugate, Chester Bradley, Joe Greenhaw, Lena Goodenough, Nell Moore, David Lohman, Evelyn Beavers, Thelma Smith, Pearlie Jenkins, Eggy Miller.

Those in assisted living or nursing facilities are Martha Perry, Geraldine Stanfield, Wretha Barfoot, Nannie Drake, Joe Mosier, Lawrence Mosier, Roberta Staples, Lorene Jackson, Roselee Loven, Jerry Cotton, Gertrude Stanfield, Fran Edgar.

Pray for those in danger like our men and women in combat, those in sorrow from the loss of a family member, a loved one.

Construction on the Trinidad railroad tracks seems to have ended, and the bridge at the big turn near Kemp on Highway 274 is now four lanes, open. Soon, we won’t remember what it was like before all the construction began in the area. As I cross that Kemp bridge, going north, I see structures arising from the creek that could be part of the old bridge we all used, one way?, in the 50s, 60s, and before. Going to basketball games in Kemp from Trinidad, I just knew the collapse would come on that bridge as our bus went over. Sometime we all raised our feet to lighten the load. Boys and girls rode together. We sang lots of songs, too. Memory Lane seems only a short time ago.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

I don’t have anything interesting to write about, which makes me feel gripey, so I think I’ll just gripe.
First of all, you never do anything I ask you. Every week I type my fingers to the bone, recounting everything stupid I’ve done for the last seven days, so you’ll have something to read about besides the war and the economy going to pot. And every now and then, just rarely, I ask you for a little favor, like giving me some advice on what is going wrong with my garden, or just a tiny little thing like button holing my daughter, Tina Norwood, and asking when I can expect the delivery of goat poop she promised. What do you do? Nothing. I don’t think that would have been too much for you to ask.
Well, not totally nothing. One loyal reader responded. Betty Norwood did bug her for me. Betty is Tina’s mother-in-law.
But I still don’t have the goat poop.
And I have peas and radishes and onions and lettuce and garlic that are waiting for it. As far as I know they all need it. Maybe some of them don’t need it. Some of you know and could tell me if you would. But nooooo. You are too busy to guide me in my learning to garden.
That brings me to my second gripe. My three kids are too busy to read my column. Or something. Maybe they are trying to avoid being embarrassed. As you can see, I do my best to outwit them on that score. I have helpers. As you have seen, Betty Norwood keeps Tina on her toes. Jo Sparks, RN, Director of Nurses at Cedar Lake Nursing Home where my son, Doug (Sonny to most of you) is administrator, faithfully reads my column and reports it to him. Daughter Liz has two sources who keep her from avoiding anything I may dish out here. Cheryl Adams, Liz’s BFF (That means best friend forever, in text messaging) who spent a lot of her childhood at my house, and who swears I never fed her anything but casseroles, has forgiven me for that, and always reads my column. Liz’s other source lives in Houston. Like Tina, Liz has a mother-in-law, Gwen Allen, who keeps her informed. She says she loves the column, but I’m guessing she loves it best when there is something about granddaughter Taegan in it.
Ok, Gwen, here’s a Taegan tidbit: She and cousin Shaylee played together out here most of the day Sunday, exploring the “forest” as they call the few acres of woods behind my house. They came to the back door, triumphantly declaring they needed a bath, their pretty little white tennies and part of their pretty little legs covered with black mud. I think they were looking forward to getting in my “space ship” steam shower I’ve written about here. But it is temporarily out of commission, so their little plan didn’t work. We just had to wipe the mud off the legs. And I got to scrape a ton of mud off the tennies. The woods they play in are the same woods two other little girls, my friend Barbara Sheppard, now Barbara Allen and I played in 60 years ago. They are looking for buried treasure. Barbara and I thought we could find traces of Indians. We never found any, but now Taegan and Shaylee can. Carl has his sweat lodge back there, and he is making some more cedar tepee poles so he can put his tepee back up. The girls love that. The first day they wandered back there and discovered that tepee, you should have seen their faces when they rushed to tell us. They really thought they’d found Indians. I guess they did, maybe not as wild as they thought, but Indians, just the same.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Malakoff Police Department is going to get a new police officer.

Monday night, the City Council approved an idea from Police Chief Billy Mitchell to drop plans to buy a new police car and to hire another full-time officer instead.

Feb

12

Posted by : admin | On : February 12, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Friends and family helped Jerry Weaks celebrate 25 years of service at the Malakoff Post Office last Sunday afternoon at Ochoa