Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

Of all the problems that face those of us living on Earth, the question of how humanity got here is one of the least pressing. However we began, since we are here humanity did begin and that is the only relevant part of the story. And the fact that we are here is the only fact that we can be reasonably sure of. I say “reasonably sure” we exist because there are those who say we don’t and while I don’t agree with them neither can I prove them wrong. I agree with Descartes, “Cogito, ergo sum; I think, therefore I am.”
Anyway, I assume that humanity exists and is a form of life. It makes some sense for humanity to base its actions on the one thing it knows for sure, that it exists.
And all estimates of the starting point of our species have this in common: it was a long time ago. And since it happened such a long time ago it lacks local relevance. It seems to me that we should be focusing on how we live this life now and in the immediate future in the light of what we know about our recorded past.
So what is one to make of this life? A young woman told me that the meaning of life was to have as much fun as you can.
I took exception to the word “fun” which is a frivolous word. People who climb Mt. Everest or dog sled to the North Pole do it out of choice but “fun” doesn’t seem an appropriate adjective.
Living on this planet is not easy. If Earth were the size of an onion we would be mites living on rafts of onion skin that float on molten magma. There are wars, hurricanes, earthquakes, famines, droughts, floods and volcanoes to keep us busy. And disease, I can’t leave disease out.
I group wars with natural disasters because like, say earthquakes, they kill and injure indiscriminately. The NFL or Ultimate Fighting are unlike war in that participation is voluntary. There is no collateral damage at The Super Bowl; unless you count hangovers and accidents on the drive back home.
From as far back as “The Epic of Gilgamesh” and “Genesis” the basic nature of humanity hasn’t changed all that much, if it all. Humanity is the way it is, so deal with it. I don’t really care how humanity became human some thousands of years ago, I care about what has happened since.
So I think there are more relevant subjects than evolution, creationism or intelligent design to be taught in high schools. Perhaps that time in biology class would be better spent on the Krebs Citric Acid Cycle. Or more time in history on the American Revolution.
If humanity put its mind to it and didn’t get distracted by the question of our origin, it could produce enough food to feed everybody. If those who would be king, so to speak, would rule with the well-being of their minions as the point of being a ruler and not the support of a particular creation theory, there would be a sharp decrease in the homeless.
If humanity could keep its eye on the ball instead of the distant past, it could do away with war and let people risk their lives in ways that involve only willing participants. I find it interesting that humanity could eliminate wars if it really wanted to but seems to lack that desire. Oh, well.
Thus Spake The Old Fogy remembering that dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. (Horace)

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

Maybe you wouldn

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008


Memorial services for Jerry David Clinard, 61, of Malakoff, are scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, July 19, 2008, at Cedar Fork Baptist Church in Trinidad.
Mr. Clinard died July 7, 2008, in Houston. He was born Nov. 3, 1946, in Nashville, Tenn. He was a truck driver.
He was preceded in death by his brother, Robert Clinard.
Survivors include wife, Mittie Clinard; daughters, Shannon Morris and Shelley Livingston; son, Jerry David Clinard Jr.; grandchildren, Blake Morris, Clyde Morris, Brandon McKinley, Heather, Jared Taylor, Brittani and Candace Clinard, Little Anthony Livingston; great-grandchildren, Kaylee Logan and Kaden McKinley; best friend, Flip.
The family thanks all those in the community who helped with donations to get Mr. Clinard to Houston for a possible heart transplant.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008


Services for George Edwin Riley, 59, Malakoff, were held June 28, 2008, at the Carroll-Lehr Funeral Home Chapel with Dan Wilson officiating.
Mr. Riley was born July 29, 1948, in Malakoff to Dorothy LeRay Pledger and Gaston E. Riley and died June 25, 2008, at his residence.
Mr. Riley resided in Dallas for many years and was a resident of Malakoff for the past 12 years.
He attended Henderson County Junior College now known as Trinity Valley Community College in Athens. He was a supervisory certified welder and was employed at Mudd Technology and Basic Storage.
Survivors include his wife Linda Riley; sons Gregory E. Riley, San Francisco, Calif.; Michael E. Riley, Midlothian; James Corday Riley II, Midlothian; daughters Julia Christine Beck, Pennville, Ind.; Megan Leah Riley, Midlothian; grandchildren Zoe Kawaheokalani Rosa-Riley, Ikaika Joseph Rosa-Riley, both of Sacramento, Calif.; James Corday Riley III, Midlothian; Taylor Anthony Beck, Maranda Alyssandra Beck, Jaedyn Christine Beck, all of Van Buren, Ind.; Trevor Allan New, Zoe Alexandria Reay, both of Midlothian; mother Dorothy Riley, Malakoff; uncle Derald Wayne-Pledger, Malakoff.
Pallbearers were Michael Reay, Gregory Riley, Corey Riley, Michael Riley, Chris Ozuna and Derald Wayne Pledger.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008


Services for Raymond George Ramsey, 75, of Malakoff, were held 11 p.m. Saturday, July 5, 2008, at Trinity Baptist Church with Bro. Floyd Loven and Bro. Tom Bolton officiating. Interment followed at Post Oak Cemetery under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Homes of Malakoff.
Mr. Ramsey died Wednesday, July 2, 2008, in Athens. He was born August 14, 1932, in Dallas to the late Samuel Ramsey and Elta May Hooten.
Mr. Ramsey was a member of Trinity Baptist Church and a plumber.
He was preceded in death by brothers, Jack and Joe Ramsey; sisters, Loyce Connaway and Ruth Dutton.
Survivors include wife, Phyllis Ramsey; sons, Samuel and Jenny Ramsey of Trinidad, Raymond JR. and Debbie Ramsey of Malakoff, David and Patty Ramsey of Payne Springs, William and Lynda Ramsey of Trinidad; daughter, Susan Hutchison of Malakoff; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers, Roy Ramsey of Duncanville, James Ramsey of Waxahachie; two sisters, Joyce Rains of Deer Park, Mary Wilkins of Pearland.
Pallbearers were Danny Ramsey, Scott Ramsey, Keelan Ramsey, Shannon Ramsey, Jonathan Hutchison, Rusty Hutchison, Stephen Alvarado, John Valdez.
Honorary pallbearers were Tommy Tanner, Larry Surls, Bobby Boone, Terry Bragg and Gary Hale.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008


Services for Henry Bonner Poole, 94 of Malakoff, were held 10 a.m. Thursday, July 10, 2008, at First United Methodist Church, Malakoff with Zeth Smith and Charles Kimble officiating. Burial followed in the Malakoff City Cemetery.
He passed away on July 8, 2008, at Hospice of East Texas in Tyler.
He was born Sept. 3, 1913, in Guy, Ark., to James and Norma Poole. He has lived in Malakoff for the past 58 years and was the owner and operator of Poole Gas Company.
He is survived by his wife of over 71 years, Margaret Derden Poole of Malakoff; son, Johnny and his wife Melinda Poole, Malakoff; daughter, Virginia and husband Charles Morman, Malakoff; daughter, D’Anna and husband Dr. Paul Wick, Tyler; sisters, Bronnie Parton, Malakoff, Evelyn Wyatt, Lakeland, Fla.; brother, Ray Poole, St. Louis, Mo.; 10 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation was held Wednesday July 9, 2008, from 6-8 p.m. at Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.
Pallbearers were Mark Morman, Lance Morman, Steve Wick, Dr. Jeff Wick, Drew Boring, Joshua Reed, Jon Yoder
In lieu of flowers, the family request donations be made to Hospice of East Texas, 4111 University Blvd. Tyler, TX 75701.
Under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

Well, I’m not the only one dying from heat. More and more are inside near a fan drinking ice water, the only suitable, healthful quencher. Cities around me can have 90 percent-off sales, but I’m not moving.

Mary Lou Hines had non-serious neck surgery two weeks ago; we hope she is doing all right.

In the paper I read of the death of one of the Malakoff Jordan boys and didn’t realize only boys were in that family. The first baby born to the parents was a girl who died at birth. The parents’ murder on Highway 31 in their store is still unsolved. Trinidad has unsolved murders, too. They are from so long ago, many do not even realize they happened. Marcus Jordan, the oldest of the sons, married Becky Shrader. She attended THS for awhile. Now the Jordans are friends with Ray and Gerry Sullivan of Mabank. Ray graduated with me from THS; his wife sells real estate. Gerry was originally a Taaffe. She and Ray lived in Tool for many years and now have a new home in the heart of Mabank.

I see so many women walking with canes. By the way the cane goes with the good leg I’ve been told. My day is coming. Then my husband said his hip is bothering him. He thinks if he lives long enough, he’ll need a hip replacement. I suppose I could get knee replacements at the same time, but he probably wouldn’t want me in the same room with him. We owe our many years together to going our own way mostly, doing what each likes. I have never fished. He hates to shop and naps in the car while I do the buying of our clothes. Some day he’ll thank me.

If my day for the cane arrives, I’ll have some of varied colors to match my clothes. This type of writing is called “jumping around, not staying with one subject.”

Well, our Trinidad cafe is gone. I heard the electrical bill was really sky-high and made the owners sick.

We did not celebrate the Fourth of July except in a mental way. The fireworks in Athens and at Tom Finley Park were reportedly spectacular. A granddaughter, 6, called from Addison, of Dallas where she was watching a show. She wanted me to go outside so I could see the pretty lights.

One year, my husband and I slipped off to Dallas for a free show near the downtown arena. Randy Travis sang his full hour although he was late. I would have given up my shoes for a glass of water, but the fireworks were unbelievable – faces, cars, colors, unimaginable images far up in the sky. They might have been seen from Trinidad. I have witnessed the great northern lights on an October night right after sundown, and I am not whistling Dixie or anything other tune.

Remember in your prayers all our soldiers, our hungry children, our abused children, our unloved children who are killed by their so-called protectors. Then on the list of ailing are Lena Goodenough, Martha Perry, Roberta Staples, Louise Fugate, Chester Bradley, Bobby Rounsavall, Elizabeth Paschall, Roselee Loven, Denise Loven, Helen Airheart.

Those in facilities or at home who are taking life easier include Merle Estes, Gertrude Stanfield, Joe Mosier, Lawrence Mosier, Fran Edgar, Lorene Jackson, Raymond Tubbs, Grady Tubbs, Joel and Barbara Ardoin, Frances Humphrey, and, of course, those I never remember at the time I’m typing

A vacant house on my street by the railroad tracks, after a loooooong time of work by the family and professionals, is about to be livable. The inside is completely redone. The house will probably stay in the family for years to come as the parents may live here first, but the grown children enjoy having some place in the country to visit. These are relatives of Chelsea Lundy who with her family lives next door on the west.

There is still continual work going on with the Trinidad tracks. Train traffic is said to start coming and going at twice the rate before as rail shipping is cheaper than trucking. Oh, for that old Depot I once visited to sit with friends on the ledges or docks.

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

The possibility of selling beer and wine in Malakoff has been raised.

The group Malakoff Citizens for Economic Growth has started the process to try and call an election in November on the following issues:

- For/Against: “The legal sale of beer and wine for off-premise consumption only.”

- For/Against: “The legal sale of mixed beverages in restaurants by food and beverage certificate holders only.”
The group has already taken the first steps, said Malakoff Citizens for Economic Growth treasurer Randy Norwood. An application containing the signatures of 10 of the city

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

The city of Malakoff looked to nearby Mabank to fill its director of public works opening.

On Monday, the City Council hired Mabank Assistant Public Works Director Timothy Whitley to take over the department.
“We are very pleased to hire (Whitley),” said Mayor Pat Isaacson. “He comes to us with a lot of experience. He understands all the things that need to be done by a public works director. I think every citizen will be pleased with him.”

Whitley will earn $53,000 a year and is scheduled to start on Monday, July 14. {{more}}

Whitley takes the place of Glen Herriage, who left Malakoff for the Athens director of utilities job. Herriage had been the Malakoff public works director for nearly 10 years and was also the co-city administrator, a job he shared with city secretary Ann Barker.

Whitley does not hold that title, leaving Barker the only city administrator.

Whitley has been with the city of Mabank for the past 12 years, working his way up through the ranks.

He is going to have to hit the ground running since the same day he was hired also saw the Texas Department of Transportation inform Malakoff it has to move its sewer and water lines on Highway 198 near the Caney City bridge.

The action is connected with the project to raise the bridge.

“We are in their right-of-way, so we have to get out of there,” Isaacson said.

The work needs to be done by the end of August.

The mayor said that the good news is that the city can do much of the work, but the project is still going to cost the city approximately $30,000. Isaacson said that money would be for materials, time and the directional boring required.

Isaacson said she wasn

Jul

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : July 10, 2008

By Pearl Cantrell

ATHENS