Mar

26

Posted by : admin | On : March 26, 2009

From Staff Reports

Investigations into illegal gambling operations in Henderson County continues, with another arrest made last week.

The District Attorney’s Office, along with Henderson County Sheriff’s Department, is continuing follow-up investigations of illegal gambling establishments following a late February raid on seven “game rooms” in the county.

DA’s Investigator Jody Miller and Assistant District Attorney Bridget Bateman traveled to the “Richards” game room on Highway 31 west in Malakoff Wednesday to conduct some follow-up investigation. {{more}}

The “Richards” game room has been subject to an ongoing investigation involving illegal gambling, organized criminal activity and money laundering, DA Scott McKee noted in a prepared press release.

Miller and Bateman made contact with Valeria Massengale, who was previously arrested for engaging in organized criminal activity and money laundering.

While speaking with Massengale, Miller spotted Brandi Burchfield, considered “a person of interest” in the ongoing investigation, inside the game room.

Miller was aware Burchfield was wanted on outstanding warrants unrelated to the gambling investigation, and placed Burchfield under arrest.

During the arrest, Burchfield was found to have a quantity of methamphetamine and marijuana in her possession, McKee reported.

Burchfield was transported to the Henderson County Jail and held under the outstanding warrants (traffic-related) and a charge of possession of a controlled substance, penalty group one. She was released later Wednesday after posting $3,700 in bonds.

McKee said game room investigations remain ongoing, and more arrests are anticipated.

“We want them out of our county,” McKee said. “Many of the owners and operators of these establishments look at these arrests as a cost of doing business. With the thousands of dollars of untaxed money they make every day, a misdemeanor (gambling) arrest is something they are willing to deal with.

“However, the owners and operators of these establishments are not doing it alone. Many times, they are part of a larger, organized ring of individuals conspiring to conduct illegal gambling and money laundering,” he added. “That makes what they are doing a felony. If they want to continue to run these operations in this county, we just raised the stakes.”

Mar

26

Posted by : admin | On : March 26, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Authorities were still searching the Richland Chambers Reservoir in Navarro County for an area grandfather and his grandson Wednesday as The Malakoff News went to press.
Missing since Monday are Jerry King, 72, of Athens and Jerrod Rachel, 17, of Cross Roads. Rachel is a senior at Cross Roads High School.

According to Navarro County Sheriff’s Department Chief Deputy Mike Cox, the pair was fishing at the lake, located south of Kerens. They last made contact with family members at about 3 p.m. Monday to say they were coming home. Police were alerted when the two men didn’t arrive by 6 p.m. {{more}}

Authorities found King’s pontoon boat floating on the lake soon after the search began, but found no sign of King or Rachel. Police said the key was turned off and the throttle was in neutral.

The lifejackets found on the boat were still wrapped in plastic.

Searchers told The Dallas Morning News that one person might have fallen overboard and the other gone in after him.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Captain Gary Dugan said the water temperature was between 55 and 60 degrees on Monday, cold enough to make a swimmer’s muscles contract on contact with the water.

King is the owner of King Sand and Gravel.
Cross Roads ISD is on spring break this week.

Mar

26

Posted by : admin | On : March 26, 2009

From Staff Reports

Malakoff is mourning the loss of a former Citizen of the Year.

Nannie Drake, 93, died peacefully in her sleep last week in Athens.

The longtime Malakoff resident was married to Marless Drake, and the couple served Malakoff in a number of ways. They owned a wholesale fuel distribution business in the city. {{more}}

Mrs. Drake served as mayor and on the Malakoff City Council and was honored as the Chamber of Commerce’s Citizen of the Year in 1980.

Former mayor and current Chamber of Commerce secretary/treasurer Pat Isaacson said Mrs. Drake was a very special person.

“She was a sweet lady and she did a lot of good around here,” she said.

Isaacson said Mrs. Drake was very involved in the area’s annual Christmas toy drive. Isaacson said that is when she got to know Mrs. Drake.

Isaacson, who is the former general manager of KCKL radio, said the Malakoff Lioness Club, of which Mrs. Drake was a member, started the toy drive. The radio station started off as a toy drop off spot for the Lioness Club, and then took over the drive about 25 years ago when the Lioness Club disbanded.

“That’s when I really got to know Nannie,” Isaacson said. “Her heart and soul was here. Her husband was extremely active in all kinds of things in the city and so was Nannie.”

As for her political work, Isaacson said, “Nothing much got passed Nannie. She was one sharp lady.”
Mrs. Drake was also very active at her church, First Baptist Church of Malakoff.

Former pastor of FBC the Rev. Casey Perry said, “I found her to be a loyal woman to her family, her community and her church.”

“She loved the community she came from – Frost. She loved the community she came to – Malakoff,” he said.
Funeral services were held last Saturday at First Baptist Church of Malakoff with former FBC pastor the Rev. Byron Orand officiating.

She is survived by daughter, Donna Drake Farmer and husband, Bob, of Athens; son, Chris Drake and wife Sylvia of Houston; grandchildren, Kelley and Casey Brownlow of Tyler, Laura and Monty Main of Malakoff, Tammy and Benjamin Brownlow of Hallsville, Aimee and Blaine Drake, Alexandra Drake, and Wade Andrew Drake of Houston. With two step-grandchildren, Deb and Bob Washmon of Tyler and Kim and Wade Farmer of Kyle, she also leaves great-grandsons Landon, Noah, George and Harris and one great-granddaughter, Rebecca, as well as numerous step-grand, great-grand, great-great-grandchildren, and four nieces spread throughout Texas.

Mar

22

Posted by : admin | On : March 22, 2009



By Britt Thompson and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Friday, February March 23, 1956

The Junior Class will present a play,

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009


Gloria Ann Haney, 70, a native of Malakoff, died Sunday, March 1, 2009.
Mrs. Haney was born April 13, 1938, the daughter of the late Olie Rhea Cantrell and the late Irene Myrtle Rozell. She would move to Malakoff with her family, attending schools before moving to Grand Prairie. She would graduate from Grand Prairie High School in 1958.
Mrs. Haney moved to Grand Prairie in 1953 where she met Ray Dean Haney, the man who would become her husband for the next 48 years. Before her health began to deteriorate, she loved to bowl. She would become acquainted with many people from the bowling alley that would become life-long friends.
Mrs. Haney was a woman of faith, and was a former member of the First Assembly of God in Grand Prairie.
Survivors include husband, Ray Haney; sons, Roy and Charles Haney; daughter, Dale Williams and her husband Ed; two grandchildren; brothers, Ed, Don and Nathan Cantrell; sister, Bettie Mathis.
A graveside service was at 2 p.m. At DFW National Cemetery Friday, March 6.

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009

Apparently a rat was the mammal left after the big extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. I’m referring to the time the asteroid hit earth and formed the Gulf of Mexico. That rat’s brain evolved to a human brain in the 65 million years since the dinosaur’s extinction.
The dinosaurs were around for the incredibly long time of 130 million years. This id probably a little long but what’s a few million years among friends.
I only consider the evolution of the brain because the rest is just baggage. There are those who say that the opposable thumb is responsible for the evolution of the human brain thus implying that the container of the brain in some way affects the structure and operation of the brain. Who knows?
It seems to me that the basic physical requirements of a brain are billions of nodes and trillions of paths between them.
The idea of a path between nodes implies there is something that passes between nodes along those paths. In the human brain there are neurons and axions and electricity.
So far we have a brain as a computer-like structure. Where the human brain differs from a computer is in the operating system. It’s the different operating systems that separate the brain of a cat from the brain of a whale.
The operating system of a computer is discrete. I think that the operating systems of mammals act as if they’re continuous which is why the human can do such amazing things such as talk and think and think it sees. But who knows?
Anyway, I suppose a rat can evolve to a human in 65 million years. Then, if a rat starts even with a proto-dinosaur, the rats could evolve to humanity, bomb itself back to rats

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009

With the sky being sorta gray for awhile, I decided to try a little harder to cheer you up. I didn’t have a lot of news, so you get a second dose of nonsense!

No one believes seniors … everyone thinks they are senile.
An elderly couple was celebrating their sixtieth anniversary. The couple had married as childhood sweethearts and had moved back to their old neighborhood after they retired. Holding hands, they walked back to their old school. It was not locked so they entered and found the old desk they’d shared, where Andy had carved, “I love you, Sally.” On their way back home, a bag of money fell out of an armored car, practically landing at their feet. Sally quickly picked it up and, not knowing what to do with it, took it home. There, she counted the money, $50,000! Andy said, “We’ve got to give it back.” Sally said, “Finders keepers.” She put the money b ack in the bag and hid it in their attic. The next day, two RCMP officers were canvassing the neighborhood looking for the money, knocked on their door. “Pardon me, did either of you find a bag they fell out of an armored car yesterday?” Sally said, “No.” Andy said, “She’s lying. She hid it in the attic.” Sally said, “Don’t believe him, he’s getting senile.” The agents turned to Andy and began to question him. One said: “Tell us the story from the beginning.” Andy said, “Well, then Sally and I were walking home from school yesterday …” the first RCMP officer turned to his partner and said, “We’re outta here.”

IDIOT SIGHTING #1
We had to have the garage door repaired. The Sears repairman told us that one of our problems was that we did not have a “large” enough motor on the opener. I thought for a minute, and said that we had the largest one Sears made at that time a

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009

By Emily Lundy
Special to The News
After the rain, the sun looks wonderful. I wonder what will come tomorrow.

Claude and Billie Jackson have a visitor for spring break, their 6-year-old great-grandson Christopher who thinks this little town is really special. A sack of minnows was really a sight for him.

Bud and Dora Anderson were visiting in Trinidad this week. They live in Little Elm north of Dallas. The two met, both single, walking their dogs while living in the same retirement home. Marriage followed. Bud has had two remarkable wives. Maybe this says something about the man. Bud wants to come back as soon as possible.

The Carroll Baker family has been pleased at the reaction of friends to their dad’s untimely death. Remember Annaleis and her family in your prayers.

Marty and James Wright were up from Huntsville last week. Marty was in Carroll’s class as Martha Yates until she was a sophomore – 1958. Adrian and Rosa Parks came from Longview too. Emily Lundy and her husband already live here. Billy and Karen
Avant were here from Hobbs. Billy graduated in 1959.

Our train track has to be the best in the state. Yesterday, one of those looking cars rode the tracks with sprayed liquid coming from both sides of the vehicle onto the ties. I don’t know if it was weed killer, a finish for the tracks or what. But it seems almost daily the tracks are getting treated in some way or other, worked on.

This is a spring break, and children are everywhere. Maybe the weather will hold for some real celebrating.

Bobby Ronsavall seems to be doing well. He and Ann are in Mansfield.

Jerry Crocker has had a setback with his throat.

Remember these on your prayer list: Martha Perry, Geraldine Stanfield, Joe Wilbanks, Nannie Drake, Gertrude Stanfield, Wretha Barfoot, Lorene Jackson, Joe Mosier, Fran Edgar, Lawrence Mosier, Roberta Staples, Eleanor Massey, all those ill or incapacitated.

Others in their own homes: Lena Goodenough, Joe Greenhaw, Eugene Berry, Evelyn Beavers, Toni Steele, Harding Airheart, Flora Robb, Betty Williams, Barbara Thompson, Bill Looney, Raymond Tubbs, Bill Holt, Bobby Johnson, Chester Bradley, Louise Fugate, and Adrian Parks,

Running for mayor are Larry Estes and Jason Tatom.
Running to keep their places on the board are Ricky Stanfield, Eric Airheart, Jay Tart. Elections are May 9. One school board seat remains open. Willie Lundy is not running.

Come out and see the girls and boys participating in baseball games.

The Senior prom will be April 18.

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009

Spring has come to the farm.
But there was a little dab of winter last week, wounding, perhaps mortally, my precious little tomato plants which I’d been pampering and dividing, and asking you all if you wanted some of them. I had put them on the front porch to toughen them up and went out of town. Then that freeze happened. They don’t look too good. However, there were a few I forgot to put out, which are doing fine. I guess I’ll start some more, so I’ll still have some to share. I also started cucumbers, zucchini, and yellow squash, which grew tall and spindly, but didn’t freeze. I planted those in the garden today. I’m a little worried about those, too.
I had another little garden situation. Some neighboring cows got into the garden. It started with one longhorn in the front yard. She looked really cute, and I sort of wanted to keep her. But I figured her owners wanted her, so I called them and they came and got her and fixed the fence. It didn’t stop anybody, because the next morning the longhorn was back with nearly a dozen of her friends. And several of them were in my garden. That little old chicken wire fence didn’t even faze them. I think they were after the hay inside the garden that I had brought there for mulch. One of them marched all the way down my potato row, which was on the far side of the garden from the hay, also stepping in my just-planted pea row, hitting the lettuce, cabbage, and onion patches as she passed. Amazingly, nothing seems really hurt. Looks like she stepped right on a lettuce, but it hasn’t quite given up the ghost yet. Strange, because Bingo, the puppy, sat on one of them and it died.
The neighbors, mostly named Dalrymple, are descendants of the late Ralph Carter. At least two different very nice young men came right out every time those cows got loose, herded them back home and fixed fence. I think Clyde, the dad Dalrymple, came out once, but I didn’t see him. I believe it took them four trips to settle those rebel cows down. They said the longhorn is the ringleader, and sure enough, just yesterday, I saw her using a horn to try to lift enough fence to get through.
Ralph bought their piece of property from my parents a long time ago. Also, for many years, he used to lease my 47 acres for pasture. Do you think those cows think they still have some moral right to be over here, kind of like many in Mexico think, maybe correctly, that Texas should still be theirs? Their pasture is much better than mine, so all I can figure is that those cows are just trying to prove something.
Things are blooming in the woods, birds are checking out my birdhouses, and the rain is really making things grow. We have cleared several paths through the woods, just to have nice places to walk. We have moved an old tub into a hollow, and installed a faucet and hose so we can provide clean water for our visiting doe and fawn when the creeks dry up. We haven’t seen the baby, but we see its footprints. I know we should not be trying to make friends with the deer, or one morning I’ll look out there and find them in the garden.

Mar

19

Posted by : admin | On : March 19, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

First Assembly of God Church has upped the ante.

Pastor Tommy Hayes has announced that the church will again host a massive Easter Egg Hunt in Malakoff, but this year there won