Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008


Services for Chelsea

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008


Graveside services for Bobby David Mayo, 61, of Kemp were held 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 29, 2008, at Oaklawn Cemetery with the Rev. Kenneth Hensley officiating and under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Mr. Mayo died Friday, Sept. 26, 2008, in Kaufman. He was born April 11, 1947, in Dallas. Previously of Mesquite, Mr. Mayo had resided in Kemp for the past 10 years and was a member of the Central Baptist Church. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army.
Survivors include wife of 39 years, Debra Mayo of Kemp; son, Jonathan Mayo of Kemp; mother, Lille Gage of Mabank; brothers, Ronnie Mayo and wife Yvonne of Mesquite, Terry Mayo and wife Debra of Tool; sisters, Shelia Mayo of Mabank, Angie Hawkins and husband Frances of Kaufman, Sandra Mayo of Maryville, Ind.; numerous nieces, nephews and in-laws.

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008


Services for Edward Parker Cason Jr., 76, of Haltom City, Texas, died Monday, Sept. 22, 2008, at Harris Methodist Hospital HEB. He was born March 23, 1932, in Malakoff to the late Edward Parker Cason and Della Carnelia Donaldson.
He worked for the Santa Fe Railroad and served as a corporal in the U.S. Army from 1953-1955.
Survivors are the family of Edward P. Cason Jr.

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008

I

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

The beat goes on for The Pride of Malakoff Band.

Last year, the Malakoff High School band had tremendous success, earning a Sweepstakes Award for receiving 1st division ratings in UIL Marching competition, UIL Concert performance and UIL Sight Reading performance. Malakoff was the only school in Class 1A or 2A to win the Sweepstakes Award in Region III last year.

“Last year was very exciting around here and we expect nothing less this year,” said band director Mark Eastin.

The drive to defend their accomplishments begins this month with band members scheduled to compete in three marching festivals before heading to the UIL Marching competition in Mesquite on Oct. 22. {{more}}

“One thing we had on our side last year was the element of surprise. No one really knew what to expect with it being my first full year here, or how the kids would respond, but we definitely turned a lot of heads and had a lot of success very quickly,” Eastin said. “This year though, we will be expected to be one of the better bands wherever we go so there is always a little bit of pressure to make sure you live up to your past accomplishments. So in a way, this year will be a bigger challenge for us, making sure we do what is necessary to build on last year and not allowing ourselves to be satisfied with what we have done but always looking to be better.”

In addition to the UIL competition, The Pride of Malakoff Band will be performing:

- Oct. 4 at the Mesquite Marching Festival

- Oct. 11 at the Cedar Creek Marching Festival in Mabank

- Oct. 18 at the HEB Marching Invitational in Hurst
This year, the band will be performing a show called “The Cosmos.” It is an original marching show composition written by John Meehan of California and includes movements titled “Big Bang,” “The Universe,” “Ave Maria” and “Big Crunch.”

“The show is a little more challenging this year,” Eastin said, “especially the drill. You won’t see many bands our size doing some of the things we do in our drill.”

Eastin said the band’s drill designer, Tate Fincher of Lake Highlands High School, helps make the band look bigger than it actually is. The show also includes more opportunities to feature individual students with solos, including a clarinet solo on the field using a wireless microphone system.

“We sometimes refer to ourselves as the small band that doesn’t think of itself as small and incorporate many things seen in the 4A and 5A bands,” Eastin said.
The band has already gotten off to a fast start this year with individual awards.

Senior Heather Woodall earned second chair trumpet in the Region III All-Region Jazz Band recently and will be participating in the All-Region Jazz clinic and concert at Ford High School Nov. 10-11. This is the second year Woodall has been selected to participate in the All-Region Jazz Band, the only student from a Class 2A school to earn that honor.

And Eastin has been nominated to be the state’s Class 2A representative to the Association of Texas Small School Bands (ATSSB) executive board. As a state representative, Eastin will be the spokesman for all Class 2A high school band directors during executive board sessions.

The ATSSB executive board sets policies on state performance and judging standards as well as oversees the audition process for All-Region and All-State bands throughout the state.

“It is a great honor to be nominated for this state level position and an opportunity for me to give back to other directors throughout the entire state as well as to the Association of Texas Small School Bands,” said Eastin.

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

Monday, Oct. 5, begins National Fire Prevention Week and members of the Malakoff Volunteer Fire Department will be out spreading the fire prevention message, just like they do every year.

“While the number of home fires is daunting, the good news is that many are easily preventable when residents take simple steps to increase their safety from fire,” said MVFD Chief Kirk Kebodeaux. “Whether it’s smoking outside the home, keeping space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn, or staying in the kitchen when you are using the stovetop, there are easy things you can do to keep your home and family safe from fire.”

But every year there are still fires that have to be fought and medical emergencies to respond to, and that’s where the MVFD comes in. {{more}}

“Last year we responded to more than 250 calls for assistance,” said Kebodeaux. “We are considered ‘first responders,’ which means we get called to medical calls and accidents.”

Currently, the MVFD has just 19 active members.

“We could use some more able-bodied people,” Kebodeaux said.
To become a member of the MVFD, applicants need to be at least 18 years old, pass a background check, and take in-house and outside training. Kebodeaux said now is a great time to join because the Henderson County Fire Chief’s Association is offering a beginners course Saturday, Oct. 25.

“Volunteer firemen are involved with the community, and it is personally very rewarding,” said Kebodeaux.

Anyone wishing to become a member of the MVFD is invited to visit one of their meetings, which are held the first and third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the fire station at the corner of Highway 198 and Star Harbor Road.

In the meantime, MVFD members will continue with their prevention efforts. Department members will visit KidsFirst Day Care on Oct. 8 and the Malakoff Elementary School Oct. 9, with Fire Marshal Garris Strange taking the lead.
Fire officials remind readers of the following safety tips:

- Cooking: Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period time, turn off the stove.

- Heating: Keep all things that can burn, such as paper, bedding or furniture, at least 3 feet away from heating equipment.

- Electrical: Replace cracked and damaged electrical cords; use extension cords for temporary wiring only. Consider having additional circuits or receptacles added by a qualified electrician.

- Smoking: If you smoke, smoke outside; wherever you smoke, use deep, sturdy ashtrays.

Oct

02

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 2, 2008

By Pearl Cantrell

ATHENS – Henderson County Commissioners hesitated to close the book on a 30-day effort to finalize next year’s $36 million budget.

But when all 33 amendments had been crafted and accepted, there wasn’t anything left to do but sign-off on it.
That they did Monday morning, 4-1, with Precinct 2 Commissioner Ronny Lawrence opposed.

He consistently opposed the way pay raises were allocated, leaving out clerks and equipment operators/laborers and sometimes giving hefty increases to those making the most, such as judges and lawyers (these mandated by the legislature). {{more}}

“Everyone who got a raise also has a county vehicle,” Lawrence pointed out. “I’d like to see us come up with a policy that would take this into consideration,” he said.
“I think overall it’s a good budget. No one’s going to get everything they wanted, but it’s progressive and attacks long-term problems,” County Judge David Holstein said.
“We’ve cut the tax rate, provided to pay the bills. It includes planning for the future. Overall it’s something we can be proud of,” he said.

The county looks forward to constructing a new Records Management Building, pending the outcome of the facilities management study being graciously paid for by the Ginger Murchison Foundation. Toward that effort, the budget reflects $2.7 million, which also includes roof repairs and renovations.

Most outstanding in this year’s budget was setting a position pay scale and determining pay raises in order to retain and attract the best and brightest to county service.
The salaries of elected officials are also broken out within the salary category, so anyone reading the budget can easily see how much office holders are compensated for their services.

One of the last five amendments was very important to the commissioners.

“I was happy with it, of course that was before I noticed my salary wasn’t included in it,” Lawrence chuckled.
That change didn’t increase the Road and Bridge budgets of each precinct, it just lessened the amount of road building material funds by $60,000 for a net change of zero.

“I could have built a lot of roads with it,” Lawrence said.
Holstein said the amended budget would be ready for public viewing at the County website hendersonco.tx.us.gov.

In addition to setting pay scales and positions, commissioners approved the budget by its seven categories.
Assistant auditor Debra Flowers explained that if the commissioners approved the budget by its categories: salaries, benefits, supplies public support, debt service, and operations and other services, the number of budget amendments coming before them weekly would greatly decrease.
“When we present amendments, you’ll get just the ones that matter. And it allows department heads to manage their areas more effectively,” Flowers recommended.

Now, amendments will be presented when funds are requested to be transferred from one category to another, she explained.

Each precinct commissioner has about $1.2 million to pay salaries (including their own, $60,000 annually) and pay for road building material, fuel, capital outlay (vehicle purchases) fuel and office supplies. This comes directly from the percentage of the tax rate allotted to them – the smallest of all other percentages, Precinct 1 Joe Hall pointed out.

Commissioners adopted the maximum tax rate as the set tax rate – 47.6016 cents per $100 worth of property value.
Even though voters approved a three-cent increase in the tax rate in order to expand the jail to nearly double its capacity, the need to increase the tax rate never materialized. In fact, this year’s rate represents a 3/8ths of a penny reduction.

Within the budget, the district attorney received funding for two full-time investigators and vehicles, a $200,000 bump in his budget over last year.

The full-time warrant officer in the County Attorney’s office was renamed investigator with a corresponding payscale increase. Court enforcement clerks’ (three positions) pay was bumped up $1,320 to be equal to other collection clerks in the Hot Check division.

Justice of the Peace (JP) precincts 2 and 3 both lost one part-time position with the cut portion amounting to $9,962 being slushed into juvenile operations to help pay for court appointed attorneys requested by Child Protective Services.

A minor adjustment in the JP4 postage line item was made to account for a previous mistake in ordering too much postage last year. “I feel she has more than enough left in her budget to cover this year’s postage,” Flowers said.

Sep

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : September 30, 2008

After class one day a student told me that he had been working and working on a problem and couldn’t get it. No matter what he tried, he couldn’t get the answer in the back of the book and could I help him with it.
“Well”, I thought, “A problem only deserves so much time. You have to know when to fish and when to cut bait.”
So I said, “Come on to my office and we’ll look at it.”
On the way to my office I asked him how much time he had spent on the problem.
Actually the time a person spends on a problem is kind of interesting and there are many forms that this time takes.
There is a pure ‘work on problem’ time. During this time you are totally into the problem and think of nothing else. You start thinking about the problem and when you look up, you are amazed at how much time has passed.
Working on a mathematics problem is not the only place where time seems to vanish. Musicians experience it. I know a welder who experiences it.
Anyway, when I was serious about a problem, I could lose three to five hour chunks of time fairly regularly. Working a month or two on a problem in three hour chunks was not rare. Some problems I have been working on for years.
They say that Newton could concentrate totally on a problem for two weeks without a break; hence his absent minded professor reputation.
So there is that kind of working on a problem.
There is the kind of working on a problem where the worker tries the same formulas and techniques over and over, hoping against hope that this time one of them will produce the answer in the book. I call this the “look for your lost wallet in the same drawer over and over” syndrome.
I’ve heard it said that a person trying the same failing technique over and over and each time expecting it to work is a sign of insanity

Sep

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : September 30, 2008

TENNESSEE – The owner of a golf course was confused about paying an invoice, so he decided to ask his secretary for some mathematical help. He called her into the office and said, “You graduated from the University of Tennessee and I need some help. If I were to give you $20,000, minus 14 percent, how much would you take off?” The secretary thought for a moment and then replied, “Everything but my earrings.”
ALABAMA – A group of Alabama friends went deer hunting and paired off in twos for the day. That night, one of the hunters returned alone, staggering under the weight of an 8-point buck. “Where’s Henry?” the others asked. – “Henry had a stroke of some kind. He’s a couple of miles back up the trail,” the successful hunter replied. – “You left Henry laying out there and carried the deer back?” they inquired. – “A tough call,” nodded the hunter. “But I figured no one is going to steal Henry.”
TEXAS – The sheriff pulled up next to the guy unloading garbage out of his pick-up into the ditch. The sheriff asked, “Why are you dumping garbage in the ditch? Don’t you see that sign right over your head?” – “Yep,” the man replied. “That’s why I am dumping it here, cause it says: Fine for Dumping Garbage!”
MISSISSIPPI – The young man from Mississippi came running into the store and said to his buddy, “Bubba, somebody just stole your pick-up truck from the parking lot!” – Bubba replied, “Did you see who it was?” – The young man answered, “I couldn’t tell but I got his license number.”
GEORGIA – A Georgia State Trooper pulled over a pick-up on I-75. The trooper asked “Got any I.D.?” – The driver replied, “‘Bout whut?”
NORTH CAROLINA – A man in North Carolina had a flat tire, pulled off on the side of the road, and proceeded to put a bouquet of flowers in the front of the car and one behind it. Then he got back in his car to wait. A passerby studied the scene as he drove by and was so curious he turned around and went back. He asked the fellow what the problem was. The man replied, “I have a flat tire.” – The passerby asked, “But what’s with the flowers?” – The man responded, “When you break down they tell you to put flares in front and flares in the back. Hey, it don’t make no sense to me, neither.”
And this from SOUTH CAROLINA – “You can say what you want about the South, but I ain’t never heard of anyone wanting to retire to the North!
It’s hard to tell which state has the most intelligent people!

Marriage is a three-ring circus: Engagement ring, wedding ring, suffering.

The woman applying for the job in a Florida lemon grove seemed way too qualified for the job. “Look Miss,” said the foreman, “have you had any actual experience in picking lemons?” – “Well, as a matter of fact, yes,” she said. “I’ve been divorced three times.”



Sep

30

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : September 30, 2008


Services for Dr. Zane Mason, 89, of Enchanted Oaks, were held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, 2008, at First Baptist Church of Mabank with the Rev. Brent Tucker officiating.
Interment followed at Trinidad City Cemetery under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Dr. Mason died Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008, in Tyler. He was born Aug. 8, 1919, in Brandenburg, Ken.
He was a college professor and a veteran of the U.S. military. Previously of Abilene has resided in Enchanted Oaks for 20 years.
Survivors include his friends Don and Vicky Chapin of Enchanted Oaks, Steve and Pam Foster of Enchanted Oaks, Don and Darlene Warner of Enchanted Oaks, Rick and Janet De Foore of Anson; many other friends and adopted family members.
Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church of Mabank, 113 E. Mt. Vernon, Mabank, TX 75147.