Oct

17

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 17, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

We are in a recession, according to Congressman Jeb Hensarling.

Oct

17

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 17, 2008

From Staff Reports

The Malakoff City Council Monday night approved changing the city’s water rates.

Council members approved increasing the minimum water bill by $3 for residents inside the city. The actual per 1,000-gallon usage cost will stay the same.

In addition tap fees for water and sewer customers outside the city went up to $800 for a

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008

By Emily Lundy
Special to The News
Waking to rain on a Monday morning gives this day a whole new reputation.

Jerry Crocker has not been hospitalized but visited a doctor twice. My sources misled me.

Butch and Maggie Mizzell have made a fast trip to northern Louisiana to be with his extremely ill dad.

Toni Steele, the Methodist pastor’s wife here, will have surgery soon for cancer that has been caught early; hopefully the prognosis will be good.

Remember these on your prayer list who are home and need better health, peace, or both: Lena Goodenough, Evelyn Beavers, Barbara Thompson, Bobby Rounsavall, Cecil and Russell Yates (the parents of 3 THS grads–Sue, Judi and Linda), Chester Bradley, Louise Fugate, etc. and Francis Humphrey.

On the prayer list are these in homes for assisted living or nursing care: Nell Moore, Gertrude Stanfield, Geraldine Stanfield, Wretha Stanfield Barfoot, Denise Loven, Roselee Oven, Eloise Fisk, Fran Edgar, Helen Airheart, Lorene Jackson, Joe Wilbanks, Merle Estes, Johnnie Holiman, Ann Hurlburt, Roberta Staples, Annie Drake with broken hip, Raymond Tubbs.

The volleyball girls played at Wortham Friday evening and lost.

Gertrude Stanfield had her 94th birthday Saturday in Granbury. Many of her family were there to help her celebrate.

The Trinity Baptist Church on Highway 274 will be open each night 6 to 8 p.m. for private prayer time until the Presidential election. This church’s congregation thought people might want to pray at an altar for our country, its leaders, the direction we are going, or for any topic where guidance is needed.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008

I was watching a program about science and the narrator was talking about Aristotle. He said that Aristotle thought there were four elements and that everything was made from these elements: earth, air, fire and water.
“But now”, the narrator said, “we know all the elements.”
And he pointed to a periodic table.
I’ll bet that was what Aristotle said.
“Hey guys, now we know what all the elements are,” pointing to the four-element periodic table of his day.
There is a general feeling that we are almost at the top of the hill. It is thought that we know all of the elements; that we are on the verge of knowing the “theory of everything.”
But this is what people have always thought, that they are living at the penultimate moment before complete understanding.
Our size limit’s the range of size we can observe. As smaller and smaller and larger and larger observations could be made, the understanding of the universe increased but I don’t see any reason to suppose that we are at the end of the road anymore than we were when the telescope and microscope were invented.
And is humanity as good as it’s going to get? Surely we can do better.
Excusing what is done today by what was done yesterday.
I was listening a Judiciary Subcommittee discuss whether President Bush was impeachable.
There was a line of argument that went like this:
President Roosevelt instigated World War II and treated Japanese-Americans improperly and he wasn’t impeached so why should President Bush be impeached for instigating the war with Iraq and treating the inmates at Gitmo improperly.
President McKinley lied about the sinking of the battleship Maine.
President Johnson lied about the Gulf of Tonkin.
President Nixon lied about Watergate.
President Clinton lied about having sex with an intern.
So why should President Bush be impeached for lying about WMDs and Al Qaeda being in Iraq.
Since the aforementioned presidents weren’t impeached, why would we want to impeach President Bush for similar acts?
The logic here is flawed, very flawed.
The fact that McKinley lied about the Battleship Maine doesn’t make it OK for Johnson to lie about the Gulf of Tonkin. Each president is responsible for his own actions and should be judged independently. Otherwise, lying would become accepted on the basis that other presidents had lied.
It would follow that any presidential act would be considered impeachable only if it was worse than any previous presidential act. And if Presidents can lie, why not Senators or anybody else?
“Johnny did it so why can’t I do it?” is a pretty childish rationale and it surprises me that legislators use it.
And it surprises me that other legislators don’t point to this flawed logic.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy thinking of a creative lie he can tell.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008

To be 6 again.
A man was sitting on the edge of the bed, observing his wife, looking at herself in the mirror. Since her birthday was not far off, he asked her what she’d like to have for her birthday. “I’d like to be six again” she replied, still looking in the mirror. On the morning of her birthday he arose early, made her a nice big bowl of Lucky Charms, and then took her to Six Flags theme park. What a day! He put her on every ride in the park; the Death Slide, the Wall of Fear, the Screaming Roller Coaster, everything there was. Five hours later they staggered out of the park. Her head was reeling and her stomach felt upside down. He then took her to McDonalds where he ordered her a Happy Meal with extra fries and a chocolate shake. Then it was off to a movie, popcorn, a soda pop, and her favorite candy, M&M’s. What a fabulous adventure! Finally she wobbled home with her husband and collapsed into bed exhausted. He leaned over his wife with a big smile and lovingly asked, “Well Dear, what was it like being six again?” Her eyes slowly opened and her expression suddenly changed. “I meant my dress size, you idiot!”
The moral of the story: Even when a man is listening, he is gonna get it wrong.

WHY I CAN’T SHOP AT WAL-MART ANYMORE
Yesterday I was buying a large bag of Purina dog chow for Toot, the wonder dog, at Wal-Mart and was about to check out. A woman behind me asked if I had a dog. On impulse to this stupid question, I told her that no, I didn’t have a dog, and I was starting the Purina Diet again. Although I probably shouldn’t because I ended up in the hospital last time, but I lost 50 pounds before I awakened in an intensive care ward with tubes coming out of most of my orifices and IVs in both arms. I told her that it was essentially a perfect diet and the way it works is to load your pants pockets with Purina nuggets and simply one or two every time you feel hungry. The food is nutritionally complete, so I was going to try it again. (I have to mention here that practically everyone in the line was by now enthralled with my story.) Horrified, she asked if I ended up in intensive care because the dog food poisoned me. I told her no; I stepped off a curb to sniff an Irish Setter’s behind and a car hit us both. I thought the guy behind her was going to have a heart attack, he was laughing so hard! Wal-Mart won’t let me shop there anymore!

Mail Call—The postman had just delivered Reverend Smith’s mail. As the cleric opened the envelopes and pulled out letters, he was surprised to unfold a sheet of paper that bore just one word, “Fool”. The next Sunday he announced, “I have known many people who have written letters and forgot to sign their names. But this week I received a letter from someone who signed his name, but forgot to write a letter.

Three Timer—Old Andy Kline passed on, and at the end of his church funeral, someone remarked, “As I recall, old Andy attended church only three times during his entire life—when he was hatched, when he was matched and now, when dispatched!

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008


Graveside services for Kenneth Eugene Parks, 89 of Athens were held on Saturday, Oct. 4, 2008, at 3 p.m. at the Walnut Creek Cemetery near Athens. He passed away Tuesday at his residence.
Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the care of the Cooper Funeral Home.
Mr. Parks was born May 20, 1919 in Coshocton, Ohio to his parents, Vearl and Lula Wills Parks. He graduated from Coshocton High School in 1937 and married Adeline Austin on April 9, 1941. He was employed for many years in management of hardware stores. He moved to Henderson County in 1978 and was owner/operator of Carpet Cleaners of America of Athens until retiring in 1996.
Mr. Parks was preceded in death by his parents; sons, Darrell Parks, Larry Parks; half-sister, Iris Syinderman.
Survivors included his wife, Adeline Parks of Coshocton, Ohio/Athens; daughter, Diane Parks- Koehler and husband Alan Koehler of Shady Oaks; daughter-in-law, Rita Parks of Colfax, Iowa; grandchildren, Jayson Murphy of Ohio, Kaleen Murphy of Houston; sisters, June Wolf and Carol Ann Barcus both of Coshocton, Ohio; and other extended family in Coshocton, Ohio.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008


Services for Bobby L. Simon, 78, of Malakoff were held Sept. 30, 2008, at 11 a.m. at Faith Community Baptist Church with the Rev. Dale Norris officiating. Burial was at Restland Memorial Park, Dallas.
Arrangements were the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Pallbearers were Jerry Ayers, Josh Ayers, Randall Ayers, Kevin Hanna, Don Brown and James Short.
Simon died Saturday, Sept. 27, 2008, in Malakoff. He was born May 18, 1930, in Whitney.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008


Funeral Services for Edna Baggett, 88, of Cross Roads, were held 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 6, 2008, at the First Baptist Church of Cross Roads, with the Rev. Frank Upchurch, officiating. Burial followed in Patterson Cemetery, Henderson County, under the direction of Carroll-Lehr Funeral Home, Athens.
Mrs. Baggett passed away on Friday, Sept. 26, 2008. She was born March 14, 1920, near Crockett to Ben and Pearl Bennett Womack. She was a member of the First Baptist Church of Cross Roads where she was active in VBS and WMU for many years. She was a homemaker and worked at Cross Roads in the cafeteria for several years.
She is preceded in death by her husband of 45 years, Lavelle Baggett and a grandson, Craige Baggett.
She is survived by her sons, Kenneth Baggett, Curtis Baggett and Tracey Baggett, daughters, Nelda June Mewbourn, Carol Hill, Lavonne Stanley, Peggy Richardson and her husband R.B., grandchildren, David Davis, Saundra Lloyd, Connie Feagins, Caryn Lastowski, Steve Hill, Robyn Chapa, Kim Young, Byron Ramirez, Johnnie Allen, Keith Baggett, 16 great-grandchildren, 17 great-great grandchildren, and a brother Elmer Womack, Harker Heights.
Pallbearers were Keith Baggett, Steve Hill, Sammy Feagins, Ronny Feagins, Les Cotton, and Mike Cotton.
The family would like to thank the employees of South Place Nursing Home and Cedar Creek Hospice for the loving care they gave our mother and grandmother. If desired, memorials may be made to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, National Headquarters, 3300 East Sunrise Drive, Tucson, Az. 85718 1-800-FIGHT-MD.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008

Having spent another uneventful week, I am reduced to giving you an inventory of my garden.
Left over from the summer:
One eggplant, with one white fruit on it that really does look like an egg, which looked great until it got overwatered and seems to be developing green freckles.
Some tall spindly okra plants which keep doling out just enough okra to keep me from pulling them up. Several very tall tomato plants which are making their second crop, but which are bending and breaking with the load. I’m thinking about putting a cast on one of them that has broken.
Some huge lamb’s quarter plants which I am cultivating for seeds.
Three bell pepper plants which were doing great until a horse got in and ate the top out of two of them. The other plant has one great looking pepper on it, which I am saving for something special.
Bird house gourds which are trying to take over everything While I was in Georgia, it reached over and grabbed some of those skinny okra stalks and pulled them over.
A few spices.
New additions:
I have set out cabbage, broccoli, collards, (which I thought were cauliflowers, but which I will enjoy more) onion and romaine lettuce plants.
I have planted spinach, radishes, and swiss chard.
I didn’t cover the radishes enough, and watering them washed their cover off. I found them just laying there on the surface growing anyhow. I covered them up, and they are doing just fine. The other things I planted haven’t come up unless those little grass-looking things are spinach or chard. I’m thinking they are what they look like.
I still have turnip greens to plant.
I think I mentioned that I have now discovered that my garden slants down hill, so the south part of it stays wetter. That is going to be a problem.
Now I notice another thing about that south part of the garden: It is right up against that super-duper workshop I was bamboozled into having built. Already the sun has moved south enough that that part is in the shade part of the day. By the middle of winter, I’m afraid I’m going to have some pale little plants with wet feet. But it’s all I have to work with, so I’m going with it.
My remodeled farm house is getting real close to being done. It is close enough I’ve moved a thing or two into it. I cleaned up an old French Provincial desk to use as a dressing table in my big bathroom. My house lacks some ceiling fans, a steam shower installed, some shelves, and a back deck. Probably a few more things, but those are what I’m waiting for.
When we get to a stopping place on the house, we are going to start on an efficiency in the end of that monster workshop. I want to get it ready for Jeff Davis, the Old Fogy, in case he ever really gets here, and decides he wants to stay for a while. I think we’ll all be glad if he does.

Oct

10

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : October 10, 2008

By Michael V. Hannigan

Somewhere on a highway between San Antonio and Corpus Christi last weekend God smote me.

And the thing is I was due a good smiting.

Last Saturday and Sunday I participated in the Valero MS 150 Bike Tour. The Valero MS 150 – also known as the “Bike to the Beach” – is a 150-mile, two-day bicycle ride between the aforementioned San Antonio and Corpus Christi. There were more than 3,000 riders involved.

The reason for the event is to raise awareness and money to combat Multiple Sclerosis, or MS. MS is an insidious disease which affects the central nervous system and can cause a long list of neurological symptoms. After reading about the disease the only way I can describe it is this: Your body doesn’t belong to you anymore. {{more}}

For the ride, I was part of Team Pure Protein along with Athens residents Bob and Carol Morton. They are the team captains and have been involved with the Valero MS 150 for the past three years for very good reason; that’s about the time their son, Rob, was diagnosed with MS.

Pearl Cantrell, the editor of The Malakoff News’ sister paper The Monitor, was also a teammate. My wife, Jennifer, is pregnant with twins and did not ride; she drove the support vehicle, however, and worked hard keeping track of everyone on the team.

Along with our 11 other teammates we raised more than $23,000 for MS research. We are still collecting donations throughout the month of October and could use your help – but more about that later.

So when did God come in? When I became so focused on completing the entire ride that I forgot why I was there in the first place.

Spoiler Alert! I didn’t make the whole 150 miles.
I started off great. The ride is broken down into 15 rest stops that are an average of eight to 14 miles apart. I made the first two stops and the first 25 miles like I was Lance Armstrong. Well, not that fast, but I was on schedule and knew that there was nothing going to stop me from strutting around Malakoff this week bragging about my 150-mile ride.

Then the clamp that holds on my bike saddle broke. I rode about 12 miles either on one edge of the seat or standing up.

That’s when I started growling.

When I got into the next rest stop, the bike mechanic there didn’t have the part I needed. Then he had trouble getting someone on the radio to try and find the part.

My growling increased.

Finally I was told I would have to ride the SAG wagon – white vans that carry tired riders from rest stop to rest stop – two stops up the line where lunch was being served to get my bike fixed.

There went my chance to complete the ride. But at least I could get back on the road and knock out the rest. After all, it isn’t my fault the bike broke.

So I waited for the SAG wagon with Carol Morton, who kindly stayed with me. We waited and waited and waited. An hour we waited, all the while the line for the SAG wagon getting longer.

Then someone asked who was getting on the SAG wagon first.
I growled again. Carol and I got on first.

It was right there, as we drove away, that I realized God was trying to get my attention. You might not think it works this way, but I know God asked me right then and there: “Why are you growling about a broken seat? Many of the people you are supposed to be doing this for can’t even ride at all, and you are being nasty because you aren’t going to ride far enough?”

What can you do when you hear something like that? I thought about how blessed I was and said I was sorry. At lunch, the next bike mechanic again had the wrong part. Instead of growling, this time I smiled – and he figured out a way to get it fixed using different parts.
And I kept smiling, even when I got pulled over by the police car.

Yeah, you read that right. Late on the first day I was peddling along, minding my own business, way, way in the back of the pack when I heard a siren behind me. I looked back and there was a patrol car with his lights flashing pulling me over.

The first thought I had was: “What, am I going three miles per hour in a two mile zone?”

Turns out I did have a speed problem – I was going too slow. I had to get back in the SAG wagon and go up a couple of rest stops because the police were closing parts of the course for the night. Unfortunately that means I drove through rather than rode through the town where The Malakoff News reader Dick Robertson graduated high school. Mr. Robertson was nice enough to come in and give a big donation to MS. Thank you, sir.

Then we slept the night in a tent with just three sides. Luckily it was a beautiful night. And it was a beautiful sleep, even when the generator two tents over kicked on at about 4:30 a.m.

I smiled and went back to sleep – until the National Anthem started playing over the loudspeakers at 5:15 a.m.
Did I mention trying to get into the showers with 3,000-plus other riders?

And every last bit of it was a blast because I had been reminded of why we were doing it. I can’t wait for next year.

So I didn’t make the 150 miles. I made quite a few, but the number doesn’t matter. The only numbers that matter are the dollars that go to MS.

If you can help, if today you know that God has blessed you, then please make a donation. Just contact the Mortons at teampureprotein@yahoo.com
Maybe together we can avoid a smiting.