May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

With all of its success in the past two years, the MISD Pride of Malakoff Band surely has the right to toot its own horn.

Director of Bands Mark Eastin just hopes it can be a quality horn.

Eastin was on hand at the MISD Board of Trustees meeting Monday night to ask board members to invest in the band through purchasing new instruments.

“Our kids are playing above the level of our instruments,” he told the board. {{more}}

It is hard to argue with the band’s recent success. Eastin told board members that before 2007, when he joined the district, the band averaged scoring II’s and III’s in sight reading and marching, with one year of I’s (First Division). Since 2007, the band has consistently brought home First Division scores, Best in Class trophies, and made the finals of its competitions.

The band has also become a State Honor Band competitor over that time period.

“Malakoff has become one of the top 2A bands in the state,” Eastin said, adding band members have their eyes on being a State Marching finalist next year (band only competes in state marching every other year).

As the band improves, the level of competition increases as well. Band members are currently entered in the Texas Music Educators Association Honor Band competition and the Association of Texas Small School Bands Outstanding Performance Series. Plus, Eastin said, the band is starting to get invitations to compete from around the country.
The one sour note comes from the instruments themselves.

“Our students are better than their instruments,” Eastin said.

Eastin said at the level the students are now competing, the quality of the instruments is becoming an issue.

“We don’t want our kids to be competing in the Indy 500 in a Volkswagen,” he said.

The band’s recent success has also led to growth for the program.

Eastin said next year eighth grade students will be added to the marching band, which should increase the number of marching band members 50 percent. He is also projecting the high school band will increase between 25-30 percent.

In order to facilitate the growth and continue to build the band program, Eastin told board members he hopes to:
– Offer every sixth grade student the opportunity to be in band without regard for monthly rental payments;
– Increase beginner band classes to 90 percent of total class enrollment;
– Provide every beginner student a beginner model instrument;
– Upgrade middle school inventory to include mid-level instruments for competitive student success; and
– Ensure high school students have quality instruments on which to perform in order to be competitive against like programs on the state and national level.

In order to achieve his goals, Eastin asked the board for the following at the Middle School: six beginner model flutes; six beginner model clarinets; six beginner model trumpets; three beginner model trombones; two beginner model tubas; and two intermediate model trombones.

He also asked for the following at the High School: 30 marching helmets; 30 helmet plumes; 60 custom gauntlets; four marching French horns; four marching baritones; three Sousaphones; two concert French horns; one tenor saxophone; one baritone saxophone; five intermediate model trumpets; and two intermediate bass clarinets.

In a Power Point presentation to the board, Eastin wrote, “We should not ask our students to perform on substandard equipment if it is within our means to offer them the ability to compete and succeed at the highest level

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

From Staff Reports

Henderson County Drug Enforcement (HCDE) officers seized approximately a quarter pound of cocaine at the Wheeler Apartments in Malakoff last week, according to Henderson County Sheriff Ray Nutt.

Arrested was Joey Tamojermone Givens, 33, of Malakoff. Givens was charged with Manufacture and Delivery of a Controlled Substance/Cocaine. {{more}}

“Givens is believed to be a major narcotics trafficker for the Trinidad, Malakoff, and Athens area,” Nutt said.
According to Sheriff’s Office reports, Givens was stopped on State Highway 31 near Malakoff by Lt. Botie Hillouse and Investigator Darrell Waller Thursday, May 14. During the traffic stop, officers found a large quantity of crack cocaine.

Following the traffic stop, officers were able to obtain a search warrant for Givens’ apartment in Malakoff from District Judge Carter Tarrance.

Investigators from the HCDE involved included Ronny Halbert, David Faught, Kenny Collard, and Waller. They were assisted by Hillhouse, Capt. Kay Langford, and the Henderson County District Attorney’s Office.

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

From Staff Reports

Brian Lee Mittenthal, 47, of Eustace, was sentenced to four years in prison last week for Aggravated Assault with a Deadly Weapon.

Mittenthal had pleaded not guilty to the charge, which stemmed from an August 2007 foot chase through the town square of Eustace. According to testimony from several eyewitnesses and Officer Stacy Wychopen of the Eustace Police Department, Mittenthal chased two young men while brandishing a loaded pistol, taking time to aim the weapon at them during the chase. Witnesses testified that the square was packed with children who were attending a cheerleading and sports camp during the chase. {{more}}

During opening statements, Assistant District Attorney Nancy Rumar described for the jury the night of Aug. 16, 2007, as a summer night like any other with children gathered around the square until panic and chaos set in when Mittenthal brandished a loaded .45 caliber pistol and chased two young men through the crowd of children and parents.

The chase and panic finally ended when David Strawn, also of Eustace, stopped Mittenthal and ordered him to put the gun in the wheelbarrow he was using at the time for yard work.

Strawn, who lives on the town square, testified that he was in his yard shoveling asphalt from his driveway when he saw the two young boys run up to him with Mittenthal in chase. When Strawn noticed Mittenthal was holding a pistol he raised his shovel and ordered him to drop the pistol.

Wychopen testified that she arrived minutes later and ordered Mittenthal to the ground and took him into custody. Wychopen also testified that the weapon was loaded with a full magazine and a round in the chamber.

The jury deliberated less than an hour before returning the four-year sentence.

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

Let’s suppose a town has 1,000 people and it’s in the mid-west.
It doesn’t need a police department; maybe a sheriff and a place to put rowdy drunks. A mostly volunteer fire department works. Being in the mid-west the land is arable and the town could be self sufficient but the citizens make trips to nearby towns or the next county to buy things. There isn’t a need for an FDA because if you don’t grow it yourself, you know the people who do.
Now let’s suppose the town has grown to 100,000.
Now it needs a police department and a professional fire department. You don’t know where your food comes from so you invent the FDA. The town has a mayor and a city council. It has taxes and school boards. You don’t know people who live and work on the other side of town.
In small towns people get together and play music. There are few villages so small that there are no musicians. In 1970 I had an 87-year-old landlord, Mr. Howard, who came from Missouri. The traditional band was a fiddle and a banjo and Mr. Howard would ride with a fiddle player over to a neighboring town, on mules, and provide dance music.
It takes a pretty big town to support a full time musician. I think most musicians in Albuquerque have day jobs. Probably most musicians in Dallas have day jobs. Some teach or work in music stores; some are electricians or state policemen. You don’t get rich playing in the New York Philharmonic, much less The Albuquerque Symphony.
Famous bluegrass musicians sell their records in the lobby after they’ve finished playing on stage. Tommy Dorsey was famous and in movies but I saw him at a dance put on by a Mormon youth group in Mesa, Arizona.
I was wandering around a small county fair in Virginia and I noticed a line of Cadillacs behind a tent. At the front of the tent was an open air bandstand where I spent the afternoon listening to Ernest Tubb, Hank Snow and Webb Pierce

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

The first three jokes this week were donated by Margaret Cunningham of Arlington.

All of his life, Ole had heard stories of an amazing family tradition. It seems that his father, grandfather and great-grandfather had all been able to walk on water on their 21st birthday. On that day, they’d walked across the lake to the boat club for their first legal drink. So when Ole’s 21st birthday came around, he and his pal Corky took a boat out to the middle of the lake. Ole stepped out of the boat and nearly drowned. Corky just managed to pull him to safety. Furious and confused, Ole went to see his grandmother. “Grandma, it’s my 21st birthday, so why can’t I walk on water and cross the lake like my father, his father, and his father before him?” Granny looked into Ole’s eye and said, “Honey, let me explain something to you. Your father, grandfather and great-grandfather were born in January. You were born in July!”

I have become quite a frivolous old gal. I’m seeing five gentlemen every day. As soon as I awaken, will power helps me out of the bed. When he leaves, I go see John and then Charley Horse comes along and takes up a lot of my attention. When he leaves, Arthur Ritis shows up and stays me from joint to joint. After such a busy day, I’m tired and ready to go to bed with Ben Gay. What a day!

Several elderly nuns were on the second floor of the convent when a fire broke out one night. The nuns calmly took off their habits and tied them together to make a rope so they could climb out the window to safety. When they were on the ground a reporter asked them, “Weren’t you afraid the rope might break since the material is so old?” – “Heavens no,” said one of the nuns. “Old habits are hard to break.”

A cowboy had two horses, but he couldn’t tell them apart. He cut off one horse’s mane, but it grew back; he cut off the tail, but it grew back, too. A friend suggested he measure the horses. The cowboy measured them and went to his friend and said, “That was a great idea: the black one was two inches taller than the white one!”

Two gas company servicemen were out checking meters in a suburban neighborhood. They parked their truck at the end of the alley and worked their way to the other end. At the last house, a woman watched out the kitchen window as they checked her meter. When they were finished checking the gas meters, the older of the two challenged the younger coworker to a race back to the truck. As they cam running up to the truck, they realized a woman as huffing and puffing right behind them. They stopped and asked her what was wrong. In between breaths, she explained, “When I saw the two of you check my meter, then take off running, I figured I had better run too!”

Why didn’t they play cards on Noah’s Ark? Because Noah sat on the deck.

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

This is actually last week’s column. I sent it in some kind of form Michael couldn’t open. So now I am ahead a week, because I already had another one ready before I discovered I didn’t get printed last week. – Loretta.

I was very social this week. I went out twice. I had dinner with my new Star Harbor golf cart riding friend Pam Jenkins, and her friend Denice, and later attended another meeting of the Malakoff Area Garden Club.
At Pam’s we went round on the golf cart, taking two boxes of books to my other new friend, Trip Calk, digging me up some asparagus roots, inspecting everybody’s gardens, and watching the deer and the bunnies, both which are plentiful out there. We had a fantastic dinner.
Trip was busy admiring a beautiful, humongous moth, which had taken up residence in Trip’s back yard, which is absolutely lovely. It really inspired me to start working on beautiful growing things as well as edible growing things.
I took Pam some radishes and onions, which she didn’t need since she has her own growing, but also two large zucchini, which impressed her.
It wasn’t till I got to the Garden Club meeting that it dawned on me I should have invited Pam and Tripp, since they are both gardeners. I would have had to warn them, though, that this garden club doesn’t do much gardening. Most of the individuals (but not all) garden, and they are gearing up to get gardens going at the Bartlett House, but mostly for the time I’ve been a part of it they’ve been wheeling and dealing and making things happen, like managing to buy the historic Bartlett house, and – nearly done now – publishing the Malakoff History book.
The best thing about it for me is that they are bunch of quirky characters, who are fun to be around. The core group has been slaving over the history book and dealing with the Bartlett house, but I haven’t done much at all. Mostly I just go to meetings. You could join and be a worker bee, or a drone like me.
We meet once a month in a spare room at the old nursing home, talk business a while, then adjourn to Ochoa’s for Mexican food and margaritas. If you think you’d enjoy this kind of garden club, give me a call and I’ll use my influence to get you in. 903-681-2880.
The corn Pam gave me to plant has come up. Pam said she heard you should plant it by the squash to give it shade. Becky Jordan told me to plant it by the tomatoes to give them shade. I did both. Trouble with the squash shade deal is that the squash grew faster and is shading the corn so much it may stunt its growth. Becky told me I should get a recipe from Patsy Ola used-to-be Woods, now Spivey, for something strange to make out of squash. I think it was pickles. Whatever it was, she said it was delicious.

May

22

Posted by : admin | On : May 22, 2009

May

21

Posted by : admin | On : May 21, 2009



By Britt Thompson and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Friday, May 22, 1964

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Powers of 2428 Nall Street , Port Neches, Texas, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Vivian Leigh, to Billy Mac Ingram, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ingram of 106 Dewey, Malakoff , Texas .

Nuptials have been scheduled for July 4 in the Church of Christ in Port Neches, with Mr. Bill York, minister, officiating. The rites will be recited at 4:30 p.m.

The bride-elect, a graduate of Port Neches-Groves High School and Lamar State College of Technology, was named to Who

May

17

Posted by : admin | On : May 17, 2009


Left to right, bottom row to top

Martha Moore, Carvel Johnson Elizabeth Clay, Lynn Kirby

Gladys Jo Robertson (Captain), Lavone Davis

Ernestine Woods, Audrey Rogers, Jayne Phillips, Elizabeth Tiner

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

I am told that I lean toward talking about, hmmm, the negative side of things. They are probably right. As I get older I see a lot more perceived flaws, some annoy me, some anger me. I suppose that when I was younger I had other things on my mind, not the short comings of the society around me,
Tonight I was watching Channel 5, a PBS station, and the lips have been out of sync with the sound all evening. I have never seen such an annoying error left uncorrected for so long. I have been noticing that when there is a string of commercials, every once in a while one starts too early or starts too late and there are a few seconds of some other commercial. The reason is that the two commercials are on two different tapes of commercials and a technician switches from one tape to the other at exactly the right instant, and there’s the rub.
I spent $1,200 at a local Ford dealer to get the “check engine” light of my daughter’s 10-year-old Escort to go out but it is still on. Come on, guys. This is an old, four cylinder car. How hard can it be?
The problem is that the mechanics don’t look at the engine, they look at a computer read-out. After the failure of the Socorro Ford dealer to get the “check engine” light out in my truck, I took it to a private garage and the mechanic, by looking at the engine, found a split in a vacuum line. Problem fixed.
I am reminded of a cartoon where a doctor has a stethoscope to the chest of a man who has an alligator clamped on his left leg.
“I make it the right leg”, says the doctor.
A teacher told me of a student who had left his answer on a mathematics test as 2 x 3 because he had forgotten to bring his calculator to class.
As a nation we have embraced the calculator and computer as the font of correct answers and all knowledge lies in Google. I look at this as an annoying flaw.
While the previous flaws annoy me, there are flaws that make me angry.
It angers me that in Congress amendments are put on bills behind closed doors.
I won’t comment about the war in Iraq but I will say that contractors, like Halliburton, who use the war to gouge out lots and lots of money, anger me
I find the rampant greed and corruption that plagues our country a cause for anger. Speaking of greed and corruption, the way Katrina and its aftermath were handled angers me.
Members of Congress who put their own interests ahead of The Country’s welfare don’t do my digestion any good.
And then there are the shakers and movers of high finance. Unless they were as dumb as tree stumps they knew they were too far out on the limb in their never ending search for more ways to make more money. Madoff stole billions from thousands of people. Wall Street and its Big Banks stole trillions from the Whole World leaving in their wake a lot of people without houses, jobs, health-care or savings; neither seemed to give much thought to the collateral damage.
The other day I read about the difference between a sociopath and a psychopath. Neither has a conscience nor any feeling for anyone else; they ignore rules and regulations. But the sociopath is disorganized and often behaves crudely while the psychopath is organized and is charming. Need I say more?
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, reading the Declaration of Independence again. It’s a good read.