May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

When the Malakoff City Council heard its audit last year, the city was facing financial hardship: Malakoff had lost money in its general fund for three straight years, operation costs were skyrocketing, and in January voters rolled back taxes.

Auditor Frank W. Steele of Hudson Anderson & Associates told council members in 2008 the city needed to make changes.

“Your margin for error is shrinking, shrinking, shrinking,” he said. {{more}}

Monday, Steele was back before the council with his annual audit with a different message. Last year the city was able to add money to its general fund.

“That’s a pretty good accomplishment based on the kind of year you went through,” he said.

The January 2008 rollback election moved the city’s tax rate from .3500 to .22106 per $100 valuation. Following the election, the city was forced to cut a police officer, an administrative position in City Hall, and eliminate plans for a new police car and computer for the police department.

“I commend you for doing that, because without that you could have just destroyed your fund balances all across the city,” Steele said. “A lot of stringent effort went into dealing with what you faced.”

The praise came with a warning, however.

“Of course, that came through maintenance that’s been deferred and capital additions that have been deferred, and somewhere out there the bill for that will come due,” he said.

The city looked to try and find additional sources of revenue last November when voters approved increasing the city’s sales tax rate.

The two-pronged plan included:

– Raising the sales tax rate three-eighths of a penny to fund a Crime Control and Prevention District; and,

– Raising the sales tax rate one-eighth of a penny to fund an Economic Development Corporation (EDC).

City officials said the increase would raise an additional $107,000 for the city based on 2007 sales figures
The Crime Prevention District would get about $80,000 based on 2007 sales tax figures to fund a wide range of police and law enforcement activities such as paying for more officers or equipment, community-related crime prevention programs, drug treatment programs or youth programs.

The EDC can use its money to help with job creation, infrastructure improvements, downtown development or a wide variety of other eligible projects.

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

From Staff Reports

Who wants to be a hero?

Malakoff VFD Fire Chief Rick Vieregge issued a call for volunteers this week, saying the fire department is looking for new members.

“We could use some more able-bodied people,” he said.
To become a member of the MVFD, applicants need to be at least 18 years old, pass a background check, and take in-house and outside training. Vieregge said the training is free. {{more}}

Now is also a great time to join because a free EMT training course is coming soon to the Henderson County Fire School.

MVFD meetings are held the first and third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the fire station at the corner of Highway 198 and Star Harbor Road. Anyone wishing to become a member of the MVFD should contact the department at 903-489-4213.

Malakoff Fire Marshal Garris Strange recently released the MVFD reports for March and April.

In March:
– 3-1, 7:30 p.m., Medical assist
– 3-4, 8:30 a.m., Power line down
– 3-5, 3 p.m., Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire
– 3-10, 1:50 p.m., Medical assist
– 3-13, 6 p.m., Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire
– 3-19, 3:50 p.m., Natural vegetation fire
– 3-20, 2 p.m., Fire
– 3-21, 6:06 p.m., Dispatched and canceled en route
– 3-24, 6:05 p.m., Medical assist
– 3-28, 5:35 p.m., Medial assist
– 3-28, 10:40 p.m., Medical assist
– 3-29, 2:24 p.m., Medical assist

In April:
– 4-2, 4 p.m., Chemical spill or leak
– 4-2, 7:55 p.m., Medical assist
– 4-9, 11:23 a.m., Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire
– 4-9, 5:02 p.m., Lock-in
– 4-11, 1:30 a.m., Extrication of victim from vehicle
– 4-11, 3:38 p.m., Extrication of victim from vehicle
– 4-14, 11:10 p.m., Medical assist
– 4-17, 12:00 a.m., Medical assist
– 4-7, 5:32 p.m., Medical assist
– 4-13, 3:20 a.m., Medical assist
– 4-17, 1:55 p.m., Medical assist
– 4-18, 8:03 a.m., Camper or recreational vehicle fire
– 4-25, 9:20 p.m., Medical assist
– 4-25, 10:50 p.m., Medical assist

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

It appears the Malakoff Historical Society is going to get its museum – it just won’t be housed in The Rock Building.
Monday night, the Malakoff City Council approved a zoning change that opened the way for the Historical Society to start building a museum at the corner of State Highway 198 and County Road 1400. The land was donated to the Historical Society in 2005.

Historical Society representative Pat Isaacson told the council Monday night that plans call for an approximately 5,000 square-foot building at the site.

“This is still very much in the planning stage,” she said, but later added that dirt work could begin at the site in the next couple of months. {{more}}

The Historical Society also asked the city to waive building and tap fees which would cost about $5,000.

The council tabled any action on that item, but was leaning against waiving the fees.

Mayor Pro-tem Tim Trimble said he was concerned about setting a bad precedent by waiving fees. After making that argument, however, he said that once the museum is up and running the city would consider using hotel/motel tax money to help with its operation.

“I would look for you to come back then,” he told Isaacson.
While plans for the museum move forward, the future of The Rock Building is in doubt.

The Historical Society had been looking to save the old Malakoff Elementary School – commonly known as The Rock Building – by turning it into a combination museum and home for the Red Waller Community Library. That plan failed because the Historical Society could not come up with the money to move the building to a new location.

In December 2008, Malakoff ISD trustees approved giving the building to the Historical Society as long as the group moved the structure off school property. Trustees gave the Historical Society nine months to move the building, and also agreed to donate what it would cost the district to demolish the building, about $60,000, to help with the move.

Monday, Isaacson said she was told estimates for the move would start at $500,000. She said the movers contacted by the Historical Society said each individual stone would have to be removed from the building, photographed, numbered, and the building cut into sections before it could be moved. Then the whole thing would have to be put back together at the new site.

“It is just not feasible at this point,” she said.
Isaacson said the Historical Society intends to attend the June MISD board meeting to formally release the building.

The building has been at the center of controversy since the Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees agreed in February 2007 to tear it down because the estimated cost of renovation was too high.

Activists, including the Historical Commission, fought for a chance to save the building. They even got the Texas Historical Commission (THC) on their side, with the THC project reviewer saying the agency “strongly encourages the preservation of this important building.”

The issue was debated during several MISD board meetings throughout 2007, and then in February 2008, trustees directed Superintendent Dr. John Spies to work out a plan with attorneys to lease The Rock Building to the Historical Society and give them three years to raise the money for the project.

But that didn’t work, either. Attorneys said any lease would have to include a clause allowing the district to take back the building if it was needed. That clause, Historical Society officials said, would kill any chance of getting grants and funding, which led up to December’s decision.

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Change has come to local government in Malakoff.

At City Hall, residents will see a new mayor: John Shumate.
Shumate far outdistanced two other candidates to fill the seat vacated late last year by former mayor Pat Isaacson.
Shumate received 81 votes, while candidates Dennis Haws got 50 and Ricky Layne Baker, Jr. received 47.

The city’s council members will stay the same, however. Only the incumbents, Tim Trimble and Jeanette King, filed for the two open council seats. Running unopposed,
Trimble picked up 118 votes and King 100. {{more}}

At Malakoff ISD, voters returned one incumbent and one newcomer.

Longtime trustee and current board vice president Rick Vieregge polled the most votes with a total of 223. Vieregge’s strongest backing came in the Malakoff city polling place.

Newcomer Pat Smith joins Vieregge on the board. He garnered 212 votes, including 92 votes in Tool – nearly three times more than any other candidate.

Incumbent Gary Woolverton was the odd man out, gaining just 179 votes.

A complete breakdown of the vote can be found at the MISD web site (malakoffisd.org).

In Trinidad, voters will also see a new mayor. Larry D. Estes raced past Jason N. Tatom, 74-25, to fill the seat vacated when former mayor Chris Quinn moved out of the city.
The Trinidad City Council will also see a newcomer, with voters electing one incumbent and one challenger.

Challenger Susan Latham picked up the most votes with 57, while incumbent Gary Brett Nolan secured another term with 38 votes. Also on the ballot was incumbent Mary E. Johnston, who polled 33 votes, Linda Brock with 32, and John Lewis with 18.

In Log Cabin, Bill Goodwin was the only one to file to be mayor. He picked up 42 votes.

The Log Cabin City Council race was much more contested, with four vying for two seats. Getting elected were Tom Garrett with 45 votes and Larry Nolan with 43. Also running were Charles Hayes, who got 34 votes, and Steve Sutton, who picked up seven votes.

All other area municipalities cancelled their elections because there were not enough candidates.

Cross Roads ISD did not have an election because it now holds elections in November in even-numbered years.

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Thomas Ray Morgan, 19, of Log Cabin was sentenced to 14 years in prison by 173rd District Judge Dan Moore last week for probation violations.

Morgan originally pleaded guilty to Indecency with a Child by Contact in August 2008 and was sentenced to eight years deferred adjudication as part of a plea bargain.

The state, under new District Attorney R. Scott McKee, filed a motion to revoke Morgan’s probation on April 3.
The state alleged that Morgan had violated numerous conditions of his probation, including failing to report to his sex offender counselor, failing to participate in sex offender counseling, and failing to pay court costs and supervision fees. {{more}}

After a hearing, Moore found that Morgan had violated 10 of the 13 counts alleged in the state’s motion and sentenced him to 14 years. Morgan faced a punishment range of two to 20 years.

According to information released by the District Attorney’s Office, Morgan’s attorney argued that the teen should receive another chance to complete his probation and that the state was placing too many expectations on him.
Assistant District Attorney Lenda Bush argued that probation does not place too many expectations on a defendant.

“His agreement last year was that he would stay out of jail, but be expected to follow the rules,” Bush said. “If you do not, you will be removed from the community.”

Since taking office in January, McKee’s office has been cracking down on offenders who haven’t been following the conditions of their probation.

“We, along with the probation department, are taking a close look at all probationers, especially those who are under supervision for crimes against children and violent crimes,” McKee said.

According to Henderson County Probation reports, McKee’s office has filed 126 motions to revoke probation since he took office.

Last week, Moore also ruled that Gun Barrel City businessman Curtis Cook violated his probation for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child.

Moore ruled that Cook violated his probation on four counts: He failed to register as a sex offender when he moved from Kaufman County to Gun Barrel City in January 2009; during a time in December 2008, he lived in Burleson, Texas, within 1,000 feet of a park were children were likely to play; he failed to obtain prior consent from the Henderson County Probation Department before moving; he failed to complete the 10 hours per month of Community Service required by his probation.

Cook pleaded guilty on Sept. 29, 2008, as part of a plea agreement worked out with the Henderson County District Attorney’s Office. Originally, Cook was not only indicted here but also three times in Kaufman County on the same charge. He was arrested in Gun Barrel City in November 2007 and then again in February 2008.

The penalty phase of Cook’s hearing and will be resumed at a later date, during which Cook could remain on deferred adjudication probation or could get five to 99 years in prison.

The Malakoff News highlighted the Cook case in an October 2008 story exploring why some confessed pedophiles receive probation. In interviews for the story, Moore and then-District Attorney Donna Bennett spoke about how the judicial system sometimes listens to the desires of the victim’s family when deciding how to proceed in a child sexual assault case. That was the situation in the Cook case, Moore said; the victim’s family did not want to put their daughter through any more trauma.

May

15

Posted by : admin | On : May 15, 2009


By Britt Thompson and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Friday, May 17, 1928

Crawley

May

08

Posted by : admin | On : May 8, 2009

For the last two homecomings I’ve been concerned that the Bayless brothers were not in attendance. As usual, I didn’t call or hear anything or ask. Now I sadly see in the paper an obit for James Bayless, not the oldest. He was 80, lived in Arlington, died there April 4, survived by brothers Virgil of Denton, William of Georgetown, Jack of Houston, and Fred of Rockdale.
James has two sons and one daughter surviving, four grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren. He served in the Air Force and had a career as a supervisor with GM. The Baylesses lived at the corner of Elam and Walnut with all sons graduating from THS. I would imagine the family was well known. The old home was torn down a few years ago as the family left here in 1984. Virgil and Velma Hendricks would have been proud of their sons as they made dads and granddads, even great-granddad. Also not all brothers in a family can go somewhere in unison today, even if still all living.
John Henry Reed, living in the old rock home of Byron Jackson, died Friday in his home. He and his wife Mary moved here from Athens nine years ago. Visitation was Monday night and the service Tuesday, both at Tomlinson Funeral Home in Malakoff. Mr. Reed had a cabinet shop in Malakoff before retirement. He leaves his wife, a daughter, and a son, and several grandchildren plus great-grandchildren.
Harvey Gene Yates, late husband of the late Elza Delores Wade Yates, was buried here Tuesday, leaving three children, many grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren. His two brothers also remain: Lawrence and Ralph, both Yates.
Some of the Wades still return for homecoming, reminding us of the fullness they added to our growing up.

Frances Airheart Newsome’s funeral was held in the First Baptist Church of Trinidad last week. The service was sweet and loving, like Frances herself who felt responsible for many friends of hers in Trinidad. She was well known in the area and a loving sister.
She is survived by her husband Lawrence of 65 years. They began their married life in the Metroplex and later came here as the seventh generation of Airhearts to live in America. The original couple settled in Pennsylvania. Someone down the line reached Tennessee; another couple came to Texas, none with many children and some losing the only one had; finally Clarence Collin and Irene found Trinidad, down Leagueline Road and eventually had six sons and four daughters: Clarence, Buster, Pete, Bill, Pat, and J.C. and Alice, Frances, Hildred and Margaret.
Now J.C., Hildred and Margeret survive as the original family. Frances leaves besides her husband, a son, David and his wife Karen, and two grandchildren, Katie graduating this year from THS and Collin graduating this year from Texas A&M. Both grandchildren have been quite active with cattle showmanship.

There is a story about Elza Yates I had not heard. We all knew her as Poostus, a nickname given to her early by a grandad. When she was 2 years old, her family took everyone to the fair in Dallas. Soon Poostus was lost. The police found her and began announcing her appearance as a lost child on the loud speaker. The only name she gave repeatedly was, “I Poostus.”
Of course her family heard the announcement and knew the child was one of theirs.

Remember impending graduation May 29, 7 p.m. I have not heard anything about Baculaureate yet.

Remember those confined to slower movement in their home or homes with others: Peggy Miller, Thelma Smith, Lena Goodenough, Flora Robb, Barbara Thompson, Nell Moore, Chester Bradley, Louise Fugate, Pat Holcomb, Thelma Smith, Grady Quinn, Joe Greenhaw, Betty Killeen, Raymond Tubbs, Eugene Berry, Sybil Glasgow, Pearlie Jenkins, Joel Ardoin, Lawrence Newsome.
Then those in staffed facilities on our prayer lists are Gertrude Stanfield, Martha Perry, Roberta Staples, Lorene Jackson, Joe Moser, Geraldine Stanfield,, Fran Edgar, Lawrence Moser, Eloise Fiske, Eleanor Massey, Merle Estes, Roselee Loven,
Bro. Wilbanks, Merle Estes, Jerry Cotton.
Lawrence Moser spent some time in the hospital a few weeks ago with pneumonia but is better now.
At any time you wish to add someone to our list, please call The Malakoff News and give the name and circumstances if you choose. The number is 903-489-0531.

Also, we want to remember the military people in danger and hardship. We pray for a safe return. We pray somehow hungry children can be fed, anywhere they are.

May

08

Posted by : admin | On : May 8, 2009


Services for John Henry Reed, Jr., 70, of Trinidad, were held 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 5, 2009, at Tomlinson Funeral Home Malakoff with Bro. Tom Bolton officiating.
Mr. Reed was born June 18, 1938, in Wichita Falls, Texas, to the late John Henry Reed and the late Willie Elmina Houston, and died Friday, May 1, 2009, in Trinidad. He was a cabinet maker.
Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Mary Ann Reed; daughter, Tammy Louise and husband John Rios of Athens; son, Michael Wade and wife Tina Reed of Murrieta, Calif.; grandchildren, John Romero Rios, Jr., Joshua Wade Reed, Nathan James Reed, Todd Michael Vargo, and Scott David Dobrick.
He was preceded in death by parents and brother, James Anthony Reed.

May

08

Posted by : admin | On : May 8, 2009


Services for Jimmy Don Cope, 70, of Malakoff, were held 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 6, 2009, at Parkview Missionary Baptist Church with Bro. Buddy Hazell and Bro. Charles Ethridge officiating. Interment followed at Malakoff Cemetery under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home Malakoff.
Mr. Cope died Sunday, May 3, 2009, in Athens. He was born Dec. 9, 1938, in Grand Saline, Texas, to the late JD Cope and the late Hazel Marie Parker Cope. He was a member of Parkview Missionary Baptist Church.
Survivors include his wife, Linda Cope of Malakoff; sons, Jimmy Don and wife Janice Cope of Rockwall, Rickey Wayne and wife April Cope of Josephin, Texas, Kendall and wife Sandy Sparks of Trinidad, Clayton Sparks of Miller Grove; daughter, Donna Jean Cope of Sulphur Springs; three aunts, one uncle, 10 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers were Kenny Parker, Ronnie Sheridan, Max Barrett, Tim Moseley, Al Partin, Mike Monroe.
Honorary pallbearers were Todd Monroe, Kendall Sparks, Clayton Sparks, and Jim Tilman.

May

08

Posted by : admin | On : May 8, 2009


Services for Willie Black, 81, of Malakoff, were held 3 p.m. Monday, May 4, 2009, at Tomlinson Funeral Home Malakoff with Don Miller officiating. Burial followed in Malakoff Cemetery.
Mrs. Black died Thursday, April 30, 2009, in Tyler. She was born Dec. 11, 1927, in Ryane, La., to the late Robert Junot and the late Lucille Lavergne. She was a homemaker.
Survivors include husband, Charles Black; sons, Raymond Black of Port Neches, Texas, Charles and wife Donna Black of Savannah, Texas; sisters, Pearl Credeur of Thibodeaux, La., Belle Boudreaux of Scott, La.; granddaughters, Shannon and husband Jason Smith of Arlington, Melissa Rae Black of Austin; grandson, Bradley Black of Savannah, Texas; great-granddaughter, Ana Beth Smith of Arlington.
Pallbearers were Hal Johnson, Bill Green, Jason Smith, Pete Truly, Joe Ladd Faulk, and Brad Black.