Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Britt Thompson and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Friday, September 3, 1965

Mrs. Dave Elenburg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Finis E. Hardy of Malakoff, received her Master of Arts degree with a major in English from The University of Texas, Saturday, August 28. She was graduated from Baylor University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1962.
Mrs. Elenburg is a graduate of Malakoff High School. She attended Henderson County Junior College, where she was a member of Phi Theta Kappa, Kappa Alpha Pi, and selected for Who’s Who.
She is teaching English and speech for her second year at San Marcos Baptist Academy, San Marcos, Texas.
Mrs. Elenburg and her husband, who is a statistician with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, make their home in Austin, Texas.
CONTRIBUTE TO LOOKING BACK! – If you have photographs, articles, or family histories that you would like to see in the Looking Back column, please contact Britt Thompson at the following email address: rbtnyu81@sbcglobal.net or mail to Britt Thompson, 7033 Blalock Drive, The Colony, Texas 75056. Photographs and text can be in any format.
DOWN MEMORY LANE – Click on the Down Memory Lane link. Share your memories as new pictures from Malakoff’s past are posted regularly.

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

I guess I’ll start off by telling you about some plans that didn’t work out exactly like we thought they would.
Sort of like the guineas, which, by the way, have not been heard of since that fateful day when Maggie chased them into the woods.
For one thing, I told you Randy Rader’s bookstore was going to keep that nice gray with white lines look in the front. Well, it was going to, until we realized, since the new facade is constructed of antique ceiling boards, which, having spent their already long life indoors, probably wouldn’t have lasted two years before coming apart without lots and lots of paint coating and supporting them. So Randy is going with her original plan, which is going to look fantastic.
The store is shaping up, and just as soon as we can, even before things are finished, we are going to bring in some shelves and books, and start loading. Because we are just two ladies of “a certain age,” it is going to take a long time to get everything like we want it. However, we plan to open the doors just as soon as possible, even before we get even a fourth – maybe a tenth – of the books in place. We hope you’ll come in, visit with us, tell us what kind of books you are looking for. Whatever it is, I’m pretty sure we’ve got some of it somewhere. It may take a while to find it. In the meantime, maybe you’ll find something else you like. That’s what I’ve always loved about used bookstores – you’re liable to find something wonderful that you never heard of before, and priced low enough you can take a chance on it.
Another plan that sort of surprised me has to do with books, too. Some of the colleges put their library rejects up for auction by the pallet. They often go for several hundred dollars, and I haven’t had the nerve to try it, because you don’t get to look at them first. But this time I bid a low minimum bid on two of them, knowing I wouldn’t win, because they always go for lots more. Well, this time nobody else bid, and I won both of them. I figured somebody must have known something I didn’t. Sure enough, when I finally got to open them, I found them full of beautifully bound stuff nobody wants to read. Government kind of stuff. Our tax dollars at work. A pallet of books is an awful lot of books. So now I’m trying to figure out how to make lemonade out of my lemons. Did you ever hear about “Books by the Yard?” If you haven’t, and are interested, Google it, and look at the prices some folks are getting for books that are sold just for their covers.
The third plan that sort of got out of hand comes with something that is getting out of hand in a wonderful way. I’ll tell you the good part first. My little pond at the foot of my flower garden is coming along beautifully. Eric Gilbert, who dug my stock pond to get the fertile loam for this garden, has been helping me dream it up, and then has been building it for me. He even found something that looked like what we’d been talking about while he and his family were on vacation, and brought me pictures of it. He dug the hole, then brought the stuff he lined his swimming pool with, a light flexible concrete-like stuff, mixed it and installed it. I got a bargain on a bunch of flagstone, and my Norwood kids gave me a bunch of great rocks left over from their building, and we are putting rocks all around it as well as everywhere else. It’s not finished yet. It is going to have a hidden pump circulating water down a river rock stream. And lots of plants surrounding it. Maybe some fish in it. We’ll probably finish it this week. Well, maybe not the fish and plants. It is going to be fantastic. Way more than I expected. I’ll never be able to neglect my garden. It would be awful to have that high class pond sitting there amongst a bunch of dead bushes and weeds.
Thinking about the pond is so pleasant, I don’t want to talk about the way I goofed up out there close to it. Besides, I’m out of room. I’ll save that story till next week.

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees voted to lower property taxes in the district Monday night.

The board set the tax rate for 2009-2010 at $1.15, which is a penny lower than last year.

The district had the ability to lower the taxes in these tough economic times because of an increase in property values, including nearly $18.5 million in new construction in the Malakoff ISD. {{more}}

Board members briefly considered keeping the tax rate the same since it is likely the district will need that penny back in the future, but as board members Todd LaRue and Clyde Tinsley both said, the board wanted to “do the right thing.”

The tax rate will be split between .99 cents for Maintenance and Operations (M&O), and .16 cents for Interest and Sinking (I&S).

The I&S fund pays for the district’s bonds, and the district was able to lower that fund by .2 cents from last year.

The M&O budget was based on:
– A tax rate of .99 cents (last year was .98 cents)
– ADA of 1,070 (same as last year)
– Tax base of 1,074,949,070 (up 11.6 percent)
– 96 percent collections
– 95 percent student attendance

Superintendent Dr. John Spies called the projections “conservative,” saying the district could do better on ADA.

This year’s M&O budget of about $13.6 million is approximately $800,000 higher than last year. Much of the increase comes from a jump in personnel costs, with $355,000 from one-time stimulus money that will be used to add projectors and computers to all classrooms.

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Benny Rogers

Editor’s Note: The Malakoff News is very happy to welcome life-long Malakoff resident Benny Rogers back to the pages of the paper. – Michael

Though it was not exactly a perfect Friday night last week at Tiger Stadium, it sure had a perfect ending.

Seeing the Tigers wearing smiles at least a mile wide and holding their helmets high in the air with pride while the Pride of Malakoff band played the school song was exactly a sight we all needed. Good-bye 13-game losing streak and hello to the rest of the season with a bounce in our steps and optimism running at full throttle.

The Tigers’ 33-15 win over Elkhart was important on many fronts. At the top of the list is it delivered a message loud and clear to the players that if they do accept the challenge of the demands – on and off the field – of first-year head coach Jamie Driskell and his staff, the road to success is one they indeed can travel. {{more}}

It’s one thing for coaches to repeatedly stress to players the importance of doing things the right way – again, on and off the field – and working hard. It’s another for validation of the message on the scoreboard. The guess here is in the event there was still doubt among any of the Tigers, it pulled a vanishing act sometime just after 10 o’clock Friday night.

Before we all get carried away with the win, which wins will sometimes make us do, let’s tap on the brakes just a tad. While it was a breath of fresh air and the shot in the arm we needed, it does not make the season. And it certainly does not firmly entrench the program Driskell wants to establish here in Tiger Town. That has to evolve over time.

As we saw Friday night, there’s still plenty of work to do and mistakes to correct. Rest assured the focal point on the practice this week was elimination of the penalties, mistakes and turnovers that prevented the Tigers from realizing their full potential in the win over Elkhart. Chances are pretty good the players, at one point or another, left after a film session or practice this week thinking to themselves “we did win the game, didn’t we?”
Good! That’s the way it’s supposed to be. Never, never be satisfied and always strive to be better.

The Tigers are definitely a work in progress, which is what you would expect considering from whence we were. Football programs don’t plummet to deep depths overnight and complete excavation thereof sometimes takes longer.

But the process is under way. And the beginning was without question a step in the right direction.

Nice job, Tigers. Keep it up!



The Tigers will be at home again tonight against the Winona Wildcats. Kickoff is set for 7:30.

Winona also brings a 1-0 record into the game. The Wildcats posted a shutout over Waskom in their opener, winning 18-0. Winona scored 10 points in a 1:39 span in the second quarter to seize control of the game.

The Wildcats were led by Jacob Wheeler’s 101 rushing yards on 10 carries. Trent Hodge-Turner added 78 yards on the ground.

Winona was 22-6 winner over the Tigers last year.



On a personal note, I am excited to have this space offered to me. My first column appeared in The Malakoff News on Thanksgiving week of 1975, when I was a junior at Malakoff High School. I am thankful to editor Michael V. Hannigan for the opportunity to share opinions and observations from time to time.

Also, thank you to the Malakoff ISD for extending me an invitation to return as Tiger Stadium PA announcer. I had spent 20-plus years behind the mike up until after the first home game of the 2001 season. I have many great memories from those years. It was nice to be “home” again Friday night.

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Malakoff City Council has proposed keeping the city’s tax rate at .221069 for a third consecutive year.

The rate has not changed since being established in January 2008 following a rollback election. The council could have increased the rate to .231473 per $100 valuation without triggering a possible rollback election, but decided against the increase.

According to information released by the city, the tax rate will bring the city an additional 3.15 percent this year. {{more}}

The City Council will hold a public hearing on the proposed budget 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 21, at City Hall. A summary of the proposed budget will be presented at the hearing.
“It is going to be a tight budget,” said City Administrator Ann Barker.

Copies of the proposed budget are available at City Hall during regular office hours.


Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

A local pastor is asking for area residents to join him at the Henderson County Courthouse on Sept. 11 to “Cry Out” for the nation.

Tommy Hayes, pastor of the Assembly of God Church in Malakoff, is a local coordinator for Cry Out America, a drive to get the country praying.

“It is time to drop denominations and party differences,” Hayes said, “and come together to pray for our nation and our leaders.” {{more}}

Cry Out America is a nationwide effort by the Awakening America Alliance, a non-denominational group working to “increase awareness of the deep spiritual need in today’s America and to pursue a new Christ awakening in our nation that will impact our world.”

According to the Awakening America Alliance, “The historical patterns of America’s Great Awakenings indicate that it is in precisely this type of seemingly hopeless national environment that God chooses to move in response to the cries of His people. Historically, when the people of God have set aside their differences to come together across this nation in extraordinary, united prayer, God has heard from heaven and responded with great outpourings of His Spirit.”

During last year’s Cry Out America, there were events scheduled in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, with more than 400 courthouse prayer meetings held.
Cry Out America in Henderson County will be held at noon Friday, Sept. 11.

Hayes said to remember Joel 1:14: “Declare a holy fast; call a sacred assembly. Summon the elders and all who live in the land to the house of the Lord your God, and cry out to the Lord.”



Online: www.awakeningamerica.us

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

From Staff Reports

Preventing serious injury in car accidents, especially to children, motivated Texas lawmakers to pass several new traffic safety laws which went into effect Sept. 1.
However, some parents may find it an uphill battle to put their 4, 5, 6, or 7-year-old back into a car safety seat.

That’s why, although the new law went into effect Tuesday, drivers whose underage and under-height passengers are not in a car safety seat will only get a warning. That is until June 2010, when citations, costing $25 will be the norm. However, repeated citations could result in $250 fines.

The new law says children under 8 years of age, or under 4 feet 9 inches tall will have to ride in a booster safety seat in order to raise them to the right height for a standard car shoulder strap safety belt. Previously, children under 5 and shorter than 3 feet were required to sit in car safety seats. {{more}}

“I’d rather listen to my child complain about sitting in a booster seat than face the consequences if they weren’t,” a Texas Department of Public Safety spokeswoman said.

The Texas Safe Riders program will direct low-income residents in getting a free car seat, if they attend a one-hour safety program in their community. Last year, the program distributed 10,000 car seats statewide, program manager Johnny Humphreys told a Dallas Morning News reporter. The program can be reached by calling 1-800-252-8255.

School zones have become no-cell-phone-use zones for motorists. However, the new law cannot be enforced unless there are signs announcing the ban posted at the beginning of each school zone. Exceptions include cell phone use if a hands-free device is present, the vehicle is stopped, or an emergency call is being placed.

Other laws target new and teen drivers. Teens who want a driver’s license must complete 34 hours of behind-the-wheel instruction, compared to 14 hours previously, and take a driving skills test in addition to a written test. Teens getting their licenses will be restricted from driving between the hours of midnight and 5 a.m., and may not drive a car with more than one unrelated passenger younger than 21 for the first year after getting the license.

In addition, no one younger than 18 is permitted to use a cell phone while driving – no talking and especially no texting. Fines go up to $200.

Researcher from the Texas Transportation Institute says a 16-year-old driver is five times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash than any other age group. The study also pointed to the most dangerous teen driving activities as involving night driving and speeding.

All passengers in vehicles are required to be strapped in or face fines up to $200. To drive a motorcycle, the driver must prove completion of a certified training course in order to get a license, and no passengers on a motorcycle younger than 5.

Fines to those caught driving with a suspended license or without insurance also went up to 180 days in jail and fines up to $2,000. Should an uninsured driver without a valid license get in an accident resulting in injury or death, the penalties are up to a year in jail and up to a $4,000 fine.

Also, if a driver has a previous DWI offense on his record and is pulled over by the police, he or she cannot refuse a blood-alcohol test.

Other new laws going into effect include:

– a tax increase on smokeless tobacco products.

– concealed handgun license holders will no longer face suspension for refusing to display their weapons to a peace officer on demand.

– a new defense against a Class A misdemeanor of carrying a concealed handgun into a bar is that the business does not clearly state 51 percent of its income comes from the sale of alcohol.

– defaulting on a student loan no longer disqualifies one for a concealed handgun license.

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009

By Emily Lundy
Special to The News
It was fun to win our first

Sep

03

Posted by : admin | On : September 3, 2009


Graveside services for Francis L. Jackson, 87, of Malakoff, were held 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009, at Malakoff Cemetery with Bro. Mike Ferguson officiating.
Mr. Jackson died Sunday, Aug. 30, 2009, in Malakoff. He was born Aug. 11, 1922, in Athens to the late English Long Jackson and the late Joise Ward.
Mr. Jackson was a train conductor with Ermco Steel, and a member of the Lion’s Club. He served in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Chenango from June 1942 to June 1945.
He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Fay Jackson; brother, English L. Jackson, Jr.; sister-in-law, Alice Jackson.
Survivors include daughter, Pat and son-in-law, Fred Zotzky of Malakoff; grandchildren, Cindy Zotzky of Malakoff, James Zotzky of South Carolina; great-grandchildren, Hannah Zotzky, Caitlin Zotzky, and James Zotzky, all of South Carolina.