Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

This is going to be short. Really. I often start these columns this way, then go chattering on so long I have to go back and erase these words. But this one is really going to be short. I’m too busy moving and sorting books. Yes, it’s true – the bookstore is going to open soon. I can’t tell you exactly how soon, but soon. We are going to open as soon as we get the floor sealed and shelves moved in, and some books put in them. Not all the books: that would take too long. Just enough books to let you come in and take a look and maybe buy some while we are still shelving more. They are going to be very reasonable.
I must tell you about the latest weird thing I’ve done. I’ve rented one of the downtown buildings. Never mind that I have a building of my own, the one where Black-eyed Susan is located; never mind I’ve plunged into this bookstore like it was my own, which it is not; never mind my broken ponds and half-done gardens; never mind I was going to go to the country and relax. I would tell you what I am going to do with that building if I knew. I think some friends and I are going to have something like a thrift mall, which is what I tried to get Donna to do. She was in the building before (as Thrifty Sisters.) In the short term we may just sell some stuff – good stuff – in order to pay the rent. You can check us out when you come to the bookstore, which is right across the street. Whatever we do, I promise to be a good citizen and help in the effort to attract more visitors to Malakoff.
I’m so busy I’m not going spend a lot of time complaining about my old troubles. The poor guineas have gone on to their rewards, so I’m trying not to grieve too much for them. However, the raccoons did add insult to injury when they tore into the sack of guinea food and spread it all over the deck. Ok, so I complained a little. But not much. We scooped it up, however, and now have it safe for the next set of unsuspecting poultry I bring out here to face the twin dangers of Maggie and the wild critters.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

An official with the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday confirmed the cleanup procedure is under way at a hazardous waste site in Malakoff.

The site, at 312 West Mitchum St., is the former location of Triple B Bumper Manufacturing, a metal plating business. EPA reports say inside the metal building are 60 55-gallon drums, many containing unknown chemicals, and open vats containing chemicals. According to the federal report, labels on the drums indicate they originally contained chemicals used in the metal plating process including “nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nickel chloride, chromium plating reagent, and calcium hypochlorite.” {{more}}

Monday, EPA On-scene Coordinator John Rinehart told The Malakoff News that the federal agency has begun the cleanup effort.

“First off, we are going to get a fence up around the property and post signs,” Rinehart said.

He said he hoped to have that completed this week.

The next step, according to Rinehart, will be to have sampling done on the chemicals inside the building and on the surrounding soil. Those samples will be sent to laboratories for examination to determine exactly what chemicals are present. With that, Rinehart can plan how to go about the cleanup.

“I’m hoping to start (removing chemicals) by the end of the year; maybe in November,” he said.

The site first came to the attention of general public in April after Malakoff Fire Marshal Garris Strange declared the building to be “immediately dangerous to life and health.”

During a briefing to the Malakoff City Council at that time, Strange said, “My biggest concern is that the structure presents an immediate danger of fire spread.” Strange said that if the building caught fire, with those chemicals inside, the VFD would be required to evacuate everyone 2/10ths of a mile around the structure during the day, and 6/10ths of a mile at night.

Strange’s action spurred the EPA to come look at the site, but not for the first time.

According to reports obtained by The Malakoff News, the EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) conducted an inspection of the building on March 18, 2008. The reports state, “The exterior of the facility building showed signs of heavy deterioration with open drainage pathways allowing for offsite migration of contaminants. Stained soils were visible around the perimeter of the building. During the course of the investigation, EPA observed vehicle and pedestrian traffic including small children in the shopping center and roads adjacent to the facility.”

The reports go on to say, “The interior of the building shows further signs of deterioration and poor housekeeping. The building houses 15 open top vats utilized in the metal plating process. These vats contain various liquid and/or solid materials of unknown composition and are all showing extensive signs of corrosion.”

The report then describes the 55-gallon drums and says, “Air and radiation monitoring was conducted both inside of the building and at the site perimeter with no readings observed above background levels.”

The reports conclude: “Proximity of the site to residential and commercial areas may constitute a hazard to the public. Poor site conditions may result in offsite impacts by hazardous materials present onsite. Lack of security and ease of access to the site may present a hazard. Local merchants reported seeing children entering the building.”

The report was filed by EPA On-Scene Coordinator Eric Delgado. In April, Delgado said the conditions at the site did not reach the level of “an emergency response.”

A possible cleanup was also delayed by confusion over ownership of the building. That problem has since been resolved, however.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

By Mercedes Hardy

STAR HARBOR – Texas Parks and Wildlife biologist Jay Whiteside presented a program titled “Living with Overabundant Deer in an Urban Setting,” last Thursday at Star Harbor City Hall. The program was attended by more than 40 residents of the city.

Whiteside reported the results of the drive-through survey he conducted last month of Star Harbor and the surrounding area which indicated clear evidence of an overabundance of deer. Overabundance means more deer concentrated in an area than the area can support. This overabundance is brought on by two main reasons: lack of natural predators and supplemental feeding of the deer. {{more}}

The message Whiteside repeatedly came back to was to stop all forms of feeding deer – now and forever.

Not only is the feeding of deer bringing financial loss to many residents, but it also does no favor to the deer.
People feed deer believing they are doing a good thing; however, this actually causes over-concentration and increased numbers in a specific area leading to disease and increased demise of the herd.

Other measures to decrease the deer grazing in Star Harbor would be to change the planting which deer are eating to “deer resistant” plants. A long list of such plants can be found at www.npsot.org/plant_list/deer_resistant. This list will be made available at City Hall for copying.

Spraying with various deer repellants may be helpful along with fencing. Fencing in Star Harbor is currently restricted to four feet height of chain link or wrought iron which deer can jump easily, however.

Whiteside warned that the situation will eventually become much worse if not addressed now; he cited the situation at the Pinnacle Club which has a herd of 70-plus deer causing damage. Whiteside said depopulating – or hunting – the herd has become necessary in Pinnacle Club.

The Star Harbor herd appears to be about 20-plus in number. Continued feeding will inevitably lead to the need to depopulate the Star Harbor herd.

Another disturbing issue tied to feeding the deer, according to Whiteside, is the attraction of other nuisance wildlife, such as wild hogs. They normally feed on grubs and roots, but will also be drawn to deer feed wherever found. The feral hog population is out of control in this part of Henderson County and is creating havoc within the city limits of Malakoff. A good example is the once beautiful green landscape at the Assembly of God Church on State Highway 31 which was torn up by hogs.

Hogs can completely destroy a lawn overnight, leaving a look as if a tiller had very roughly churned up the soil 12 to 24 inches deep. A sow and 10 piglets have already been sighted in Star Harbor and a group of 10 at the curve on Star Harbor Road, where both sides of the road have already been rooted up.

Whiteside said the only way to stop hogs is with metal fencing.

For more information, contact Lori Andresen at 903-489-0807 or Mercedes Hardy at 903-489-1803.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Greatest Generation is leaving us, but before they go a group is trying to honor their warriors.

Honor Flight is a program that flies World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to see their memorial – and others, of course – at no cost to the veteran.

“The veteran’s money is no good,” said Henderson County organizer John Rhinehart. “By charter, Honor Flight cannot accept a donation from a World War II veteran. The flight is of no cost to him, his meals are paid, his luggage handling is done for him, check-in is done, his hotel is covered.” {{more}}

Rhinehart and Harold Servetnick have been working since July to get an Honor Flight organized in Henderson County. As they start to build here they are partnering with Ellis County Honor Flight.

Servetnick is himself a World War II veteran, having served in the European theater in 1942-1944. He is the one who actually started the move to bring the program to Henderson County.

“I saw it searching on the Internet,” he said. “I looked for more information and thought it was something interesting for me and other veterans.”

Servetnick has actually been to Washington, D.C. before.
“I’d like to see the changes (there), but this is more to give other veterans an opportunity,” he said.

The Honor Flight Network (HFN) stretches across the country, and according to its website, by the end of 2009 HFN will have flown more than 42,165 veterans to Washington, D.C.
Here in Henderson County the number of surviving World War II veterans is surprising, according to Rhinehart. He said the Department of Veteran Affairs said there were more than 900 surviving World War II veterans in the county.

“Our initial goal is to notify them about Honor Flight,” Rhinehart said.

The first flight, partnered with Ellis County, was originally scheduled for Oct. 20 but has been pushed back because of funding.

World War II veteran Bob Anderson lives in Star Harbor; he thinks the Honor Flight is a wonderful idea.

“It’s a great thing,” he said. “Everybody I talk to is very enthused.”

Anderson was a gunner with the 380th Bombardment Group, The Flying Circus, flew B-24 Liberator bombers and was part of the 5th Air Force. He served in the South Pacific, flying more than 35 missions in 1944 and 1945.

He was drafted while still in high school. He received his diploma when he came home from the war.

“I’ve always been proud to be a veteran,” Anderson said. “I was always proud to do what was expected of me.”
It is service like that that inspired HFN.

“It is just a way to thank them for their sacrifices and service,” Rhinehart said.

After the World War II veterans, Honor Flight intends to move on to the Korean veterans and then Vietnam veterans.
“We’d like to find as many veterans as we can and we trust that there will be support,” Servetnick said.

For more information on Honor Flight, or to make a donation, please call Rhinehart at 903-677-8863 or Servetnick at 903-292-1380.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

From Staff Reports

Members of the Malakoff FFA are catching their breath between competing at the East Texas State Fair last weekend and getting ready for their annual rodeo next Saturday.
Last weekend, Molly LaRue won Champion Limousin in the Prospect Steer Show.

Cody Hancock placed third with his Maine Anjou steer and Collin and Conner Hancock both placed fourth with their Chianina and Charolais steers.

Mason Allen placed fourth with his Brangus heifer and Garrett Airheart won his class in the Simbrah heifer division. {{more}}

Also, two Malakoff teams competed in Range and Pasture plant Identification with one of the teams finishing fourth.
Team members included Cody Hancock, Coty Castro, Megan Dalrymple, Collin Hancock, Abigail Bateman, Conner Hancock, Johnann Osteen, and Luke Dandridge.

“The Malakoff FFA, along with all its members, wish to thank all the community who turned out to support them in their efforts and we look forward to seeing everyone on October 10 for our annual FFA rodeo,” said MHS Ag instructor Kenneth Hancock.

The Malakoff FFA Ag Boosters Open/Youth Stampede will be 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10, at the Ag arena behind the high school.

Events and fees include: Tiedown calf roping, $40; 14 and under girls breakaway, $25; 14 and under boys breakaway, $25; team roping, $40; youth team roping 15 and under, $40; 13 to 15 youth bull riding, $40; 12 and under steer riding, $40; 14 and under barrels, $35; 15-18 barrels, $35; senior barrel racing, $40; open bull riding, $40.

Books open Saturday from 5:30 p.m. To 7:30 p.m. at the rodeo. There will be a $5 late fee after 7:30 p.m.

Minors release will be on hand for contestants under 18 years of age. Parent or legal guardian must sign or youth will not be eligible to compete. Malakoff Ag Boosters and Malakoff ISD personnel are not responsible for accidents.
Admission is $5 for adults. The stock contractor is Bobby Floyd.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009


Born Oct. 23, 1952, Donna Lynn Williams, resident of Star Harbor, Texas, lost her courageous battle with liver disease on Sept. 25, 2009.
She is survived by her husband, Jack Williams; son, Scott Williams and wife, Maylena; grandson, Joseph Williams; parents, Joe and Patt Edwards; sister, Yvonne Escobedo and husband, Mike; nephew, Connor Escobedo; along with many other family members and friends.
Throughout her battle, Mrs. Williams never lost her joyous sense of humor which was an encouragement to everyone she met.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009

Perry Scrimshire, 57, of Tool, died Saturday, Sept. 26, 2009, in Kemp. He was born Sept. 19, 1952, in Borger, Texas, son of James A. Scrimshire and Maxine Panter.
He was a member of First Baptist Church of Tool, and was employed by Groom & Sons Hardware.
Surviving are his wife, Linda Scrimshire; parents, James and Maxine Scrimshire; sons, Corey and Kim Brown Scrimshire, Kevin and Stacy Scrimshire; daughter, Cody and Jonathan Hamilton; brothers, James Hollis Scrimshire, John Max Scrimshire.
Services were held at First Baptist Church of Tool at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2009, with Bro. Ed Brennan officiating and under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home of Seven Points.
Interment followed in the Tool Cemetery.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009


Maudine Terry Gunnels, a life-time resident of Henderson County, died Sept. 26, 2009, in Athens.
She was one of six children born to Lee Ander Terry and Callie John Patton, on May 11, 1916 in Crockett, Texas. She was raised north of Trinidad in the Mankin Community where she married Jesse Lee Gunnels and at the time of his death in 2002, they had been married 69 years.
Mrs. Gunnels outlived her parents and five siblings, her husband, her son-in-law Mickey Simmons, a baby Jessye, and two grandsons-in-law.
A devout Christian, she was a member of the First United Methodist Church in Malakoff, at the time of her death. She worked and retired from the Malakoff School District.
A devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Mrs. Gunnels is survived by her daughter, Callie Gunnels Simmons; her sons and daughters-in-law, Billy and Barbara, Richard and Glenda, and Randy Gunnels; eight grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and 13 great-great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews.
The loving tender caregivers who became a beloved part of the family, Maria Espiricueta and Juanita Johnson, you’re appreciated and may God bless your loving hands and hearts.
Services were 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009, at First United Methodist Church in Malakoff. Graveside services were at 1 p.m. at Mankin Cemetery.
The services were conducted by the Rev. Charles Kimble and Bro. Buddy Hazel, under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home.
Pallbearers were grandsons and great-grandsons.

Oct

01

Posted by : admin | On : October 1, 2009


A memorial service for Robert Levi Garrett, 72, of Malakoff, was held Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009, at 11 a.m., at Trinity Baptist Church of Trinidad with Bro. Tom Bolton officiating. Mr. Garrett passed away on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2009, in Athens.
Mr. Garrett was born Nov. 24, 1936, in Klondike, Texas to Morgan and Lucy Jones Garrett. He was a Veteran of the US Army. Mr. Garrett moved to this area from Dallas in 1976. He served in law enforcement and retired as Chief of Police of Star Harbor. Mr. Garrett was Baptist and a member of the Malakoff Masonic Lodge 759.
He was preceded in death by his parents, four brothers and two daughters.
Survivors include his wife, Delores Garrett of Malakoff; sons and daughters-in-law, Lance and Beverly Garrett of Cleburne, Texas; Jim and Debbie Murphy of Malakoff; daughters and sons-in-laws, Kim and David Hansen of Payne Springs; and Cyndi and Kenneth Cleaver of Talty, Texas; one sister, Ophelia Garrett of Mesquite; one brother, Joe Garrett of Mesquite, Texas; 14 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to Trinity Baptist Church of Trinidad, Texas or an organization of your choice.