Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

Special to The News

Members of the Cedar Creek Knife and Tomahawk Club have been busy over the past few months, attending several throwing events.

Six members traveled to Belen, New Mexico, for the first Southwestern Tomahawk and Knife Championship. Mike Bainton won first in knife and second in ‘hawk, and was the men’s champion. Chuck Weems was second in knife and third in ‘hawk; Roy Neal was fifth in both categories. Women’s champion was Erica Molock, taking first place in both events. {{more}}

The next event was at the Alamo for the second year where Roy Neal took first place, Chuck Weems third, Steve Jackson sixth, and B.J. Blackwell seventh.

At the World Championship in Austin, Bobby Pyle won second place in the knife, Mike Bainton third, Steve Jackson seventh, and Chuck Weems second.. In the Intermediate Division Tomahawk, Steve Jackson took second, Roy Neal fifth, and Chuck Weems sixth. In the Gold Cup match, Bob Pyle won second and Steve Jackson fifth.

At the International Knife and Tomahawk Hall of Fame banquet, Chuck Weems was awarded the Mountain Man Throw of the Year and also was given the Steel Life Achievement 10 Years award.

In the most recent throw Feb. 7-8 in Hawkins, Texas, Chuck Weems won first place, Bob Pyle second, and Steve Jackson third.

The club is gearing up for the Texas State Championship to be held April 25-26 in Malakoff. This is the 10th anniversary for the event since the club took it on, and is now billed as the largest Mountain Man throwing event in the world. Sponsored by the Malakoff Rotary Club, last year’s event saw another record number of competitors and guests. Weems, the club president, said he is hoping for another record turnout. This year each thrower will receive a gift to commemorate the 10th annual event.

The City of Malakoff, Malakoff Rotary Club, local merchants and individuals of the community have supported this event in the past and has been a big part of its success. The club welcomes supporters and donations to keep the event going and growing.

Recently several members of the club were shown on the History Channel program “Extreme Marskman,” and there are also several websites where members are performing demonstrations and teaching the art of knife and tomahawk throwing. All of these programs show that Malakoff, Texas, is the home of the world’s largest throwing event, the Texas State Championship.

Anyone wanting more information may contact Chuck Weems at 903-677-3581.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Need something to read? The Red Waller Community Library in Malakoff is the place to go.

According to Librarian Will Bryan, the library has received about 200 new books on a wide variety of subjects. The books were paid for with a state grant.

“We have a lot of great new books on subjects like self-help, health, history, dieting, biography and best sellers,” Bryan said. {{more}}

In the reference section, the library has added a set of books that covers general health and cancer. The additions come on the heels of the library cleaning out outdated books.

“The point of purchasing all the new non-fiction was to have more relevant non-fiction,” Bryan said. “There were a lot of books, especially in the health section, that were 30 years old.”

On the new book shelf, the library is featuring everything from Ann Coulter to Vampires, and histories about Washington.

“We want people to know that things are changing in here and to encourage them to come in and look around,” Bryan said. “We want to have people excited about coming in here.”
Bryan said the library will also be placing a sign on State Highway 31.

“Even after all this time, some people don’t know there is a library here,” he said.

The library is located at 109 Melton Street in City Hall. It is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Don’t forget that the library can be reached through the Internet at www.malakofflibrary.org.

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

Henderson County Sheriff Ray Nutt issued a press release this afternoon regarding the murder of a man in Trinidad. The press release follows:

On 2/18/2009 the Henderson County Sheriff

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

Back in the black and white TV days there was a program called “Stoney Burke.” Stoney Burke was a saddle bronc rider who followed the rodeo circuit and wore the belt buckle of a defending champion. He was portrayed by Jack Lord, who was more believable here than in “Hawaii Five-0.” He had a side-kick played by Warren Oates who was a country slicker and was always looking for an edge.
Warren had been a little too slick with the drivers of some cattle trucks and they were about to do him grievous harm when his friend Stoney stepped in and smoothed the situation over. He said that his side-kick was a little crooked but an OK guy.
How often in movies it is that a friend is a bit off center but an OK guy. “Ride the High Country” is a movie about such a friendship. In “The Third Man,” Harry Lime is somehow taking medicine away from children or maybe diluting it and making lots of money. When Joseph Cotton tells Harry’s girlfriend, played by Valle, what a villain Harry is he probably thinks she will fall into his arms.
“I thought you were his friend”, she says. “You know that’s just the way Harry is.” She walks away leaving Joseph Cotton staring after her.
Joseph Cotton didn’t understand about the friendship between Harry Lime and Valle.
Robert Deniro’s role in “Mean Streets” is an extreme example of a difficult friend. This movie was about a bunch of guys who had grown up together in the same Italian neighborhood in New York City. Long time acquaintance builds strong friendship. Frankly, Deniro was so obnoxious that it was surprising that his character hadn’t been killed long ago.
In a little town in Idaho during the war Thelma shot and killed her husband, George, while they were playing bridge with another couple. George had just given Thelma a palomino for her birthday, or so I heard.
The jury, Tommy D. was the foreman, acquitted Thelma.
My grandmother, Rosie, went up to the foreman and said, “Tommie, how could you let Thelma go scot-free? She killed George.”
“Rosie, we’ve known Thelma all her life. We couldn’t send her to prison.”
I have friends that never show up on time if they show up at all. When I loan them money I know that I’m really giving them money because they never pay it back. On the other hand if I need someone to push my car I know I can count on him

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

This is a nonpartisan joke that can be enjoyed by both parties. Not only that, it is politically correct

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

I doubt I can get another column out of the goat poop issue. The last two were stretching it a bit. But I do have to report that some of you finally came through and bugged my daughter Tina until she broke down and brought me buckets of goat manure for my garden. It is now waiting to be tilled in. That is Carl’s job. I wonder if I should push my luck and ask some of you to ask him if he has run the tiller yet. Maybe not. But if you just happened to see him and felt like it

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees approved about $4 million for renovations to the middle school Monday night.
The cost includes a $3.716 million Guaranteed Maximum Price for construction by the contractor, and about $336,000 in other costs, including architect fees and technology cabling, along with miscellaneous items such as a soil test.

Superintendent Dr. John Spies said $3 million of the cost would be paid from the $7 million bond which was passed by voters last year. The final up to $1 million will come out of the district’s fund balance. {{more}}

The project will include:

- Replacing outdated air conditioning units with energy efficient models;

- constructing a new library to meet current size standards;

- constructing a new band hall;

- constructing new office for added security;

- adding additional rest rooms;

- renovating science labs to meet existing standards;

- renovating computer labs to meet existing standards;

- general restoration such as new doors, carpet, cabinets, ceiling tiles and technology cabling in each classroom;

- renovation in the kitchen, including opening the kitchen for additional space;

- a new roof.

The cost for the work is about $1 million over projections made during the bond election last May. Spies said that was mainly because of the roof.

“The roof wasn’t included in the first projection,” Spies said.

Spies said a roof consultant recommended the work be done after the bond had passed.

“The roof was not inspected closely enough (before the election),” he said.

He also said the district has recouped $120,000 in insurance money for the roof based on damage from a hail storm in 2005.

Other increases include the work in the kitchen and abatement of a small amount of asbestos found after the bond election.

Spies said the $4 million price also includes $300,000 for contingencies.

“We shouldn’t be spending the whole $1 million out of the fund balance,” he said.

The project is expected to be completed by Aug. 1.

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

By Pearl Cantrell

ATHENS – Henderson County commissioners will be appointing a new County Treasurer Wednesday, Feb. 25.

Tuesday, County Treasurer Karin Smith, serving the county six years, submitted her resignation to commissioners.
Smith plans to take up her previous county job as first assistant auditor.

The person holding that post also resigned last week, according to reports. {{more}}

Interested candidates may submit a r

Feb

19

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 19, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Spaz, Maverick and Tall-T all spoke to the Malakoff Rotary Club Tuesday afternoon.

The three students – better known as Courtnee Forrester and Allen Cochran of Cross Roads, and Travis Perez of Malakoff – all went to leadership camp last weekend thanks to the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA). Tuesday they were reporting back to the local club about the camp.

Each year, the Malakoff Rotary Club sends several area students to leadership camp as part of RYLA. {{more}}

RYLA is Rotary’s leadership training program for students, and according to the Rotary website:

- emphasizes leadership, citizenship, and personal growth;

- demonstrates Rotary’s respect and concern for youth;

- provides an effective training experience for selected youth and potential leaders;

- encourages leadership of youth by youth;

- recognize publicly young people who are rendering service to their communities.

According to the local club’s district website, “RYLA began in Australia in the 1960s as a program to identify and develop those young people with leadership skills. These young people become very positive influences and role models once they return to their schools. Our district held its first camp in 1996 and has influenced the lives of approximately 800 young people in our district in that time.”

Tuesday each of the three students was given a chance to speak to Rotarians, and among the many stories of camp hijinks was the evidence of growing leadership qualities.
Speaking from a prepared statement, Perez said, “I learned that RYLA isn’t just an award, it is a chance to allow the leader to shine in me, as well as the thousands of people around me in my daily life. I would love to return to the RYLA camp next year and influence the upcoming juniors and help them get the ultimate experience to be leaders. Your time and generosity is greatly appreciated, and I am grateful for the opportunity to learn new things and become who I am today.”

Cochran said, “I want to keep my journey (at camp) in my memory as I head off to college; that I can be a leader and I can be an impact in my community wherever I go, and to use the skills they taught me there in my ever day life.”

Forrester, talking about overcoming a ropes obstacle high in the air, said, “I felt like I had done something I never would have done in my life. My whole team pushing me helped me get through it.”

“At the end I didn’t want to go home, I wanted to stay there,” she said.



Online: check out www.ryla580.org