Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009


Ruth Marie Williams, 87, of Trinidad, passed away peacefully on May 21, 2009. She was born in Normangee, Texas, on Dec. 21, 1921, daughter to Aubrey A. Cox and Mabel McGee Cox.
Mrs. Williams is predeceased by husband Gilbert Doyle Williams; daughter, Judith Davault; and sister, Sybil Cox Stevens.
She is survived by her sister-in-law, Dixie Little of Duncanville; daughter, Carol Rippa of San Antonio; son, Allen Williams of North Richland Hills; granddaughters, Jill Ammann of San Antonio, Wendy Brylak of San Antonio, Holly Weihl of Arvada, Colorado, Sarah Ohgushi of Portland, Ore., Karen Gandy of Jacksonville, Jennifer Davault of Jacksonville; grandsons, David Davault of Tyler, Todd Davault of Tyler, Danny Williams of Bryan, Nicholas Williams of North Richland Hills. She also has 15 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Williams grew up in Mexia, Texas. She graduated from Mexia High School and attended Sam Houston State College. She met Gilbert Williams while attending Sam Houston and married him in 1942. He proudly served in the United States Army Air Corp in World War II. Mrs. Williams gave birth to Carol during this time. After the war, they settled in Dallas and had two more kids, Judy and Allen. Mrs. Williams was a homemaker. She proudly raised three kids. After two of the kids left home, she went to work for Parkland Hospital as a screening associate in admitting. In 1982, Gilbert and Ruth retired to their home on Cedar Creek Lake.
Mrs. Williams loved living on the lake. She was very active in the Methodist Church all while they were living in Dallas and at their retirement home on the lake. She and her daughter, Judy, sang in the choir for many years. She participated in the Methodist women societies.
Mrs. Williams loved her sports and was a true hometown fan. You could always see her in front of the TV cheering for the Cowboys, the Mavericks or the Stars. She was also an avid fan of golf.
During the last six months, Mrs. Williams relocated to San Antonio to assisted living at Morningside Manor. The staff at Morningside could see that they had a “live wire.” Within a month she was on the welcoming committee, server at many of the functions and cookie maker. She also enjoyed attending many family events with her daughter, two granddaughters and many grandkids.
The Lord truly blessed Ruth in all the work of His hands. As a result, those who were fortunate to be a part of her life have also been greatly blessed. The gift she gave was a gift of love to all who knew her. She will be dearly missed.
Mrs. Williams was laid to rest in Bluebonnet Hills in Colleyville on Tuesday, May 26, 2009.
The family requests that donations in Mrs. Williams’ memory be made to Morningside Manor, 602 Babcock Road, San Antonio, TX 78201.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009


Services for Fred “Fredman” Paris, 88, of Athens died Friday, May 22, 2009, at East Texas Medical Center of Athens.
Mr. Paris attended public school in Henderson County. He was a veteran of World War II, a member and deacon of Mt. Providence Baptist Church in Athens, and he worked as a roofer.
Funeral services were held on Saturday, May 30, 2009, at 1 p.m. at Mt. Providence Baptist Church in Athens with Pastor R. L. White officiating. Burial followed in Barker Cemetery.
Survivors include wife, Geneive Paris of Athens; daughter, Ruth Brown; brother, Jerome Paris of Athens; sisters, Lucille Henderson of Los Angeles, Calif., Louise McGinty of Athens, and Amanda L. Thomas of Malakoff.
Pallbearers were Billy E. Johnson, Micheal Paris, Darrell Paris, Curtis Thomas, Joseph W. Thomas, and Jonathan Williams.
Services were under the direction of Cain-Brown’s Memorial Funeral Home.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

Today I listened to the Senate debate and pass an amendment to the Financial Fraud Bill. This amendment would form an independent commission to investigate the causes of the recent financial collapse.
I don’t need a commission to tell me what went wrong; it was greed out of control.
By greed I mean wanting more than enough and greed is not necessarily bad. Greed is an essential part of free market capitalism. I suppose Carnegie built US Steel to make a lot more money than he needed. So if we as a country are going to have free market capitalism, we are going to have to accept greed along with it.
The question is, “How much greed is too much?”
I think that when John D. Rockefeller put small independent oil companies out of business by unfair pricing practices, he was exhibiting too much greed. Generally, when a person takes money from someone else using “dirty tricks” their greed has gone beyond acceptable limits.
In ancient Greece, being excessive was a sin. Considering “The Iliad” as a morality play, Achilleus had to die because he was excessive in his killing of Trojans after the death of his long time friend Patroclus at the hand of the Trojan hero, Hector.
I might suggest that the financial problems we now face are because of excess.
We spend an excessive amount of money on professional athletics. Giving a professional ball player a contract for $26 million is excessive.
We spend an excessive amount of money on cars and motorcycles that go faster that we can drive them.
We spend an excessive amount of money on cosmetics, male and female, and on pets.
We spend an excessive amount of money on the stars of rock and roll and movies.
I might say that much of this excess is due to a failure of education which has not taught us how to amuse ourselves.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, turning on the Lakers’ game.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

Two brothers were walking home from Sunday School, each deep in his own thoughts. Finally, one boy said, “What do you think about all that devil stuff we learned today?” – The other replied thoughtfully, “Well, you know how Santa Claus turned out? The devil’s probably just Dad in disguise, too.”

The doctor that had been seeing an 80-year-old woman for most of her life finally retired. At her next checkup, the new doctor told her to bring a list of all the medicines that had been prescribed for her.
As the young doctor was looking through these, his eyes grew wide as he realized she had a prescription for birth control pills. “Mrs. Smith, do you realize these are birth control pills?”
“Yes, they help me sleep at night.”
“Mrs. Smith, I assure you there is absolutely nothing in these that could possibly help you sleep!”
She reached out and patted the young doctor’s knee. “Yes, dear, I know that. But every morning I grind one up and mix it in the glass of orange juice that my 16-year-old granddaughter drinks

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

Big celebrations going on around here lately. Granddaughter Ariel, called Adrion at school, just graduated. Maybe you saw her picture in the paper. As you’ve heard from me already, all my grandchildren are exceptional. Ariel is exceptionally exceptional. Besides being pretty as a picture, she made salutatorian, and has excelled in just about everything she has put her hand to. She sang a beautiful solo at Baccalaureate, and made a great salutatorian talk. We are all very proud of her. She heads off to TCU this fall, and has earned enough scholarships to make it possible. The whole family gathered out here at my house before graduation, where I fed them tubs of Stauffer’s chicken enchiladas. I did, however, make the Spanish rice and the beans that went with it; and accompanied it with cucumber and onion salad from my garden.
Also this week I got to attend the wedding to one of my very favorite young men. T.J. Abbe is the son of Karen Abbe, a great friend of mine, who runs our home health agency. T.J. worked at the nursing home in maintenance while he went to college. In fact, friends who also worked at the nursing home introduced T.J to Ashley, now his bride. Karen’s kids really have fine outdoor weddings. Lots of flowers, and lots of excellent food afterward. T.J.’s twin sister Laura had a gorgeous wedding a couple of years ago. The twins are the grandchildren of Charlene Owen, formerly Abbe, another great friend, who ran the nursing home for many years. The wedding was at a ranch out in the wilds between Cayuga and Corsicana. I managed to get lost and pulled up just as the flower girl was sprinkling the rose petals. Latecomers are much more noticeable at an outdoor wedding.
I’ve had a problem I’ve really been struggling with. I’ve had fleas. Well, not personally, not yet. But the puppies have had them, and therefore, I guess my house has. I was using all the right stuff, and they still had fleas. Apparently the Advantage would kill them, but more jump on. I sprayed, bombed, and powdered the house, and sprayed the yard, and still the dogs got fleas.
So I’ve pulled all the rugs except one out of the house, and have just about stripped the house of everything that is decorative but not really useful, and sprayed the heck out of everything. The fleas seem to be gone. We’ll see.
My garden is SO wonderful. I’m giving away squash, zucchini, potatoes and cucumbers. I have lots of tomatoes that are just beginning to turn pink. Sharing vegetables really paid off this week – I took some to Janet and Bill Ratliff, my favorite used appliance fixers and sellers, and they gave me a whole bunch of fish they had just cleaned and frozen. I was there is enlist their aid in getting two extra refrigerators out of that workshop, that I had built last year, which is already crammed full of stuff.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The Malakoff High School Class of 2009 saw 68 graduates walk across the stage during commencement exercises last Friday night at Trinity Valley Community College Cardinal Gym.

The graduating seniors were led by valedictorian Joshua Keith Willis and salutatorian Adrion Ariel Humble.

In a change from recent years, the officers for the Class of 2009 asked to be addressed by a guest speaker, then chose popular coach and science teacher DeArtis Nickerson.

“Tonight is the night that you as a class have been anxiously awaiting,” Nickerson said at the beginning of his remarks. “It is the final chapter of a book that you began over 13 years ago as you entered your first day of school. It is the beginning of a new book that you will continue to write long after the benediction is given tonight.” {{more}}

Nickerson went on to exhort students – and everyone else in attendance – to take three steps to help them reach their goals: plan, prepare and produce.

“Success is a journey,” he said, “not a destination.”
He also warned the seniors to be careful.

“As you enter the roadway to success seniors, proceed with caution,” he said. “Do not exceed the speed limit as many bumps and dips can be found on the road to success, but accelerate with a good attitude toward learning with clear goals for what you want to accomplish in your life. Do not yield to the temptations of those who are driving on the wrong side of the road. Remember to stop when you see yourself making a mistake. Look at all the alternatives before making a decision. Listen to good advice given to you by your parents and teachers. Remember, half of learning is listening.”

Nickerson finished with an original poem titled “Success.”
If you want to succeed/confidence is what you need. If you want to obtain success/always give your very best. Success, fortune, fame/it’s not easy to obtain. It’s not easy to reach the top/but once you start, please don’t stop. Set your goals and set them high/spread your wings and try to fly. Success doesn’t come easy, you have been told/continue to reach for a higher goal. As you travel to success/try not to get depressed. Things won’t always go like you want them to/pursue your dreams and follow through. Seniors, the road may be lumpy, rocky and rough/don’t ever give up and say I’ve had enough.

The speeches from the valedictorian and salutatorian also had literary overtones, with Willis quoting from Shel Silverstein, and Humble basing her speech on the popular Christian song, “This Little Light of Mine.”

In addition to reading the Silverstein poem “Eight Balloons,” Willis, who has signed on to join the U.S. Navy, spoke of the Navy motto of “honor, courage, and commitment.”
He also told his classmates to, “Never be satisfied; always strive for more.”

Humble’s faith was on display during her speech as she used the children’s song to make a point.

“Our light is a burning passion,” she said. “It is our time to catch ourselves on fire and light the world.”

The invocation was given by Alexandria Lavon Bennett and the benediction by Erica Frances Maurer.

The entire school board was also in attendance, including: President Rick Vieregge, Vice President Jan Shelton, Secretary Homer Ray Trimble, Belinda Brownlow, Clyde Tinsley, Todd LaRue, and Dr. Pat Smith.

Graduates included the Top 10 graduates, in order, Joshua Keith Willis, Adrion Ariel Humble, Heather Charlsie Woodall, Alexandria Lavon Bennett, Erica Frances Maurer, Ethan Juan Monsivais, Daniel Keith Haberman, Allana Danielle Dilworth, Zack Hampton Minter, and Tavion Dwayne McCullar.

The rest of the students, alphabetically (* denotes honors) included: Kevin Daniel Arbour, Jamie D’Lee Brown, Rebecca Gail Brownlow, Buck Jacob Bryant, Cien’CA Sha Mirah Bryant, Amanda Nicolle Bunger, Ryan Tyler Clark, Ariel Brooke Clendening*, Morgan Alisa Coker*, Kaileah Willow Dawn Cole*, Timothy James Cook, Olivia Hauolikealaokalani Costa-Kekauoha, Denny Darin Dailey, Paul Michel Damiani*, Jessica Danae Dollgener, Guy Wesley Dupree, David Dennis Gastauer, Tadd Michael Gouge, Megan Marie Guthrie, Kandra Lee Hale, Michael DeAngelo Hall, Robert Calvin Heath, Daniel Wayne Higgins, Michael John Huckabee, Decker Chase Hudgins, Kathryn Kay Kennedy, Justin Scott Killough Sr., Devin Renee Legel*, Grant Matthew Lewis, Dustin Jay Lindsey, Jerry Lyn Lockaby, Traci Lynn Mason, Cory Lee Mayon, Nathan Ryan Molnar, Charles Douglas Moore, Laci Jae Mullins, Akiko Adriane Nakamura, Sarah Jo Neal*, Kevin Lee Oppelt, Brandon Health Ott, TaMeshai Daniel Overton, Kimberly Rodriguez, Steven Daniel Schulte, Nicholas Anthony Simione, Lacy Kay Sorenson, De’Marius Terrell Sparks, Courtney Amelia Staggs, James Earl Stanton*, Lacie Jey Stolte, Parker James Street*, Cody Johneric Strickland, Dalton Wayne Sumrall*, Justin Durell Thomas, Sara Elizabeth Turner, Davis Lee Vaughn, Gaston Pettigrew Wilder, Joshua Paul Williams*, James William Zambotti.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

Editor’s Note: The Malakoff News reported on the rock pile dispute in last week’s edition, including some of the critics’ specific complaints and Pct. 1 Commissioner Joe Hall’s responses. That story can be accessed online at www.malakoffnews.com.

By Michael V. Hannigan

A dispute between some city residents and Henderson County Precinct 1 could cause the City of Malakoff to revisit one of its ordinances.

The dispute centers around a large pile of rubble across from the Precinct 1 office and yard off State Highway 31 and directly behind The Lindy Mall. The property is owned by the county and most of the material currently making up the rubble came from the demolition of the old Malakoff Middle School auditorium.

Critics of the pile, which include owners of The Lindy Mall Ray and Janet Brown and residents of the nearby Spring Creek Mobile Home Park, say the site poses a health risk. {{more}}

Attorney Brian Schmidt, who represents the Browns, wrote a letter to Commissioners’ Court late last month claiming, “

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Sometimes Goliath does hear David.

A representative from State Rep. Betty Brown’s office announced last Friday that the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) pushed back plans to widen portions of Farm-to-Market 753 and State Highway 59.

That is welcome news for the Crescent Heights Water Company. The project, announced only recently, would have required the small utility, located halfway between Malakoff and Athens, to move an unknown number water lines in the project area. It was a task Crescent Heights officials said they couldn’t afford or complete within TxDOT’s schedule. {{more}}

TxDOT was looking to complete the project by the end of the year. Locally, the project calls for widening FM 753 between State Highways 31 and 59; and widening SH 59 from the intersection of FM 753 in Shady Oaks all the way to the Athens loop.

In an email to The Malakoff News last Friday, Brown’s District Director Amy Gould announced TxDOT would be moving the construction project to March 2010.

“This will give us ample time to work with Crescent Heights and identify a funding source,” she said.

Officials with the water company welcomed the extra time.

“This certainly does help us,” said Crescent Heights manager Melba Gibson. “This way we can see where we stand.”

Gibson said the water company did not learn of the proposed project until late April.

During a meeting with TxDOT officials in May, Crescent Heights officials heard that funding for the project came unexpectedly.

TxDOT Deputy District Engineer Glenn H. Green told board members the widening project is being paid for with federal funds set aside to address safety issues. Although the money is not related to the federal stimulus package, TxDOT officials said it was the use of stimulus funds on other projects that freed up the money for the local project.

“We are generally way out in front (contacting utilities) on these projects,” Green told board members, “but not this time. We did not expect these jobs to be funded; and even when they were funded, we did not expect to let bids this year.”

With no time to plan, Crescent Heights officials did not know how to pay for their part of the project.

“It was just boom, like a burst of light thrown at you,” said Gibson.

They turned to Brown’s Office and Gould for help. Gould has been working for the past month, looking for a solution to balance the needs of both TxDOT and the water company.

Gould said it was the unexpected nature of the project that eventually convinced TxDOT to change the schedule.

“I think they just realized it was to the benefit of everyone involved to push it back and get a good game plan on the table,” she said.

Brown said, “I think we can all agree that the widening of FM 59 and FM 753 would improve the safety of these roads, but I want to ensure that this project is as unintrusive as possible. I am pleased to have the full cooperation of TxDOT and will work to see that this project is handled in a manner that is as beneficial as it can be for all parties involved.”

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The preliminary numbers are in.

Malakoff ISD last week released preliminary TAKS scores for 2009. According to the scores, Malakoff administrators project:

– Tool Elementary School will be rated Exemplary
– Malakoff Elementary will be rated Recognized
– Malakoff Middle School will be rated Acceptable
– Malakoff High School will be rated Recognized
– The district as a whole will be rated Acceptable
Officials said these ratings are based on preliminary scores and could change, but Superintendent Dr. John Spies said, “We are pleased with the continued educational improvement these scores indicate.” {{more}}

Highlights from the scores include 100 percent passing in: Malakoff 4th grade writing; Tool 3rd grade reading; Tool 3rd grade math; Tool 4th grade writing; Tool 5th grade reading; High School 9th grade reading; and High School 10th grade social studies.

In addition, there was great improvement over last year at the Middle School. All but one subject area improved over last year.

“The Middle School showed major improvements in social studies and science, the two areas of concern from last year,” said Spies. “We are headed in the right direction. I am still concerned about our science scores.”

The percentage of Middle School 8th grade students passing the science portion of the TAKS did increase almost 11 percent, but still stands at less than 70 percent overall. Sixty-four students took the test with 44 passing.
Just one subset of scores kept the district from being Recognized, Spies said.

“As a district we have 22 indicators that count. Of those, 13 are in the exemplary range, eight are in the recognized range, and one is in the acceptable range. That one keeps us from being recognized,” he said.

Jun

05

Posted by : admin | On : June 5, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

A 21-year-old Malakoff man was sentenced to a little over eight years in a federal prison last week for Possession of Unlawfully Made and Unregistered incendiary bombs.
U.S. District Judge Leonard Davis gave Charles Eric Morman the 97-month sentence last Wednesday.

According to prosecutors, on April 1, 2008, Athens police received a report of a fire bomb being thrown from a vehicle near the Brown Apartments on Stirman Street. Later, police stopped a vehicle matching the description of the suspect’s vehicle. A search turned up two whiskey bottles full of gasoline, a roll of toilet paper and a cigarette lighter. There were also pieces of charred toilet paper on the front passenger floorboard. {{more}}
The remains of the bomb at the apartments matched the “Molotov cocktail” type bombs found in the car, police said.

According to reports, Morman admitted to the officers he was responsible for the incident.

Morman was indicted by a Federal Grand Jury in September 2008 and pleaded guilty last December.

In 2006, The Van Zandt County Sheriff’s Office reported arresting Morman for evading arrest, public intoxication and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was also indicted by a Henderson County Grand Jury in 2007 for Aggravated Robbery.