Jan

28

Posted by : admin | On : January 28, 2010

A Russian, an American, and a blonde were talking one day. The Russian said, “We were the first in space!” The American said, “We were the first on the moon!” The Blonde said, “So what, we’re going to be the first on the sun!” The Russian and the American looked at each other and shook their heads. “You can’t land on the sun, you idiot! You’ll burn up!” said the Russian. To which the blonde replied, “We’re not stupid, you know. We’re going at night!”

The best reasons not to exercise
1) My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was 60. She’s 97 now and we don’t know where in the world she is.
2) I joined a health club last year, spent $400. Haven’t lost a pound, apparently you have to show up.
3) I don’t exercise at all. If God meant for us to touch our toes, He would have put them further up on our body.

Is there an engineer in your life?
Two engineering students were crossing the campus when one said, “Where did you get such a great bike!” The second engineer replied, “Well, I was walking along yesterday minding my own business when a beautiful woman rode up on this bike.” She threw the bike to the ground, and took off all her clothes and said, “Take what you want.” The first engineer nodded approvingly, “Good choice; the clothes probably wouldn’t have fit.”

Normal people believe that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain’t broke, it doesn’t have enough features yet.

Not everyone is brilliant:
– When his 38-caliber revolver failed to fire at his intended victim during a hold-up in Long Beach, Calif., would-be robber James Elliott did something that can only inspire wonder. He peered down the barrel and tried the trigger again. This time it worked.
– An American teenager was in the hospital recovering from a serious head wound received from an oncoming train. When asked how he received the injury, the lad told police that he was simply trying to see how close he could get his head to a moving train before he was hit.
– A man walked into a Louisiana Circle-K, put a $20 bill on the counter and asked for change. When then clerk opened the cash drawer, the man pulled a gun and asked for all the cash in the register, which the clerk promptly provided. The man took the cash from the clerk and fled, leaving the $20 bill on the county. The total amount of cash he got from the drawer: $15. (If someone points a gun at you and gives you money is a crime committed?)
– This one wins the prize for stupidity. When a man attempted to siphon gasoline from a motor home parked on a Seattle street, he got much more than he bargained for. Police arrived on the scene to find a very sick man curled up next to a motor home near spilled sewage. A police spokesperson said the man had admitted to trying to steal gasoline and had plugged his siphon hose into the motor home’s sewage tank by mistake. The owner of the vehicle declined to press charges, saying that it was the best laugh he had ever had.
A guy was sitting quietly reading his paper when his wife walked up behind him and whacked him on the head with a magazine.
“What was that for?” He asked.
“That was for the piece of paper in your pants pocket with the name Laura Lou written on it,” she replied.
“Two weeks ago when I went to the races, Laura Lou was the name of one of the horses I bet on,” he explained.
“Oh honey, I’m sorry,” she said. “I should have known there was a good explanation.”
Three days later he was watching a ball game on TV when she walked up and hit him on the head again, this time with an iron skillet, which knocked him out cold. When he came to, he asked, “What the heck was that for?”
She replied, “Your horse called.”

A woman reported the disappearance of her husband to the police. The officer in charge looked at the photograph she handed to him, questioned her, and then asked if she wished to give her husband any message if they found him. “Yes,” she replied. “Tell him Mother didn’t come after all.”

Getting old is sooo hard at times. Yesterday I got Preparation ‘H’ mixed up with Poli-Grip. Now, I walk funny, but my gums don’t itch.

A group of friends went deer hunting and separated into pairs for the day. That night, one hunter returned alone, staggering under a huge buck.
“Where’s Harry,” another hunter asked.
“He fainted a couple of miles up the trail,” Harry’s partner replied.
“You left him lying there alone and carried the deer back?”
“It was a tough decision,” the hunter said. “But I figured no one is going to steal Harry.”

A very foolish husband says to his wife, “Honey you stick to the washin’, ironin’, cookin’, and scrubbin’. Ain’t no wife of mine is gonna work.”

Jan

28

Posted by : admin | On : January 28, 2010


Jessie Earl Freeman, 62, a resident of Sulphur Veterans Center in Sulphur, Okla., passed away Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010, at the VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Okla.
He was born Aug. 12, 1947, in Muskogee, Okla., to John Wilburn Freeman, Sr. and Velma Lou Evans Freeman. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a salvage metals dealer before retirement. Jessie loved the Lord and his country, and was a member of Bethel Baptist Church. He will be missed by all who knew him.
Preceding Jessie in death were his parents, a sister, Billie Ara Irons, a brother John Wilburn Freeman, Jr., brother-in-law Larry Lang and great-nephew Nathaniel Cameron.
He is survived by: three sisters, Bobbie Grandstaff and husband Jack of Malakoff, Catherine Lang of Novi, Mich. and Peggy Reul and husband Robert of Poteau, Okla.; a sister-in-law, Pat Freeman of Muskogee, Okla.; a brother-in-law, Leon Irons of Tulsa, Okla.; and an aunt, Arma Lee Jones of LeFlore, Okla. Also close to his heart are 12 nieces and nephews: Cody Greer of Tulsa, Okla., Kitty and Bruce Grandstaff of Irving, Johnny Levi Freeman and J.W., III, Jerry, and Susan (Freeman) Odell, all of Muskogee, Okla., Tana Tapson of Berkley, Mich., Henry Lang of White Lake, Mich. and Gina Lang of Waterford, Mich., Eric Reul of Ohio, Lindsey Reul of Poteau, Okla. and Alex Reul of Perksie, Penn.; and a host of other relatives and friends.
A graveside memorial service with military honors was held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010, at Fort Gibson National Ceametery. Arrangements were by OK Creation and Mortuary Service of Oklahoma City, Okla. Memories and messages can be shared in the online guest book by clicking on “Obituaries” at www.okcreation.com

Jan

28

Posted by : admin | On : January 28, 2010


On Jan. 18, 2010, John Henry Bevel, Jr. left this world for his heavenly home – one that we know he is in awe of at this very moment – one where he was met by his precious Lord, wife, grandson, son-in-law and a host of family members.
He was a resident of Henderson County most of his 93 years except for the 20 years he served in the United States Navy. After retiring from the Navy in 1960, he worked for Curtis Mathes, retiring after 20 years. The rest of his 93 years were spent raising a few cows and gardening.
Mr. Bevel was preceded in death by his wife Jimmie Lou Bevel in 1999; grandson Wesley Harvey in 1997; son-in-law in 2002; brothers, Hughey and Richard Bevel; sister Faye Meubourne.
He is survived by son, Johnny Bevel and wife Carolyn, Cross Roads; daughters, Sandra Bevel and Pat Harvey both of Cross Roads; brother, Raymond Bevel, Athens; sister-in-law, Lola Welch; several nephews and nieces.
Pallbearers were Judge Tommy Barnett, Randy Teal, Scott Thomas, Dwayne Allen, Martin Stockard and Billy Lee.
Honorary pallbearers were Herndon Youngblood , Billy Don Stewart and O.V.
Services were 2 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010, at Cross Roads Baptist Church with Rev. Frank Upchurch officiating.
Burial with honors followed at Post Oak Cemetery.

Jan

28

Posted by : admin | On : January 28, 2010

I didn’t get it right about my sister Mary. I said she would be home from the hospital before you read last week’s column. And I said I’d bet she doesn’t have to get a pacemaker. But she’s not home yet, and as I write this, she is getting that pacemaker. She is doing great, and they say she will feel much better than she has for a long time. She is scheduled to get out of the hospital Wednesday. She is not supposed to drive for two weeks, which she isn’t going to like a bit. I’m pretty sure her column will return next week.
My mouse eradication program is meeting with more success this week. My new electric PETA approved zapper has wiped out three of the little buggers, and I’ve caught that many in live traps. I have real mixed feelings about electrocuting them, but I’m doing it. And I haven’t seen signs of a mouse in several days.
The puppies are absolute too cute. They have moved from the corner of the bedroom to a walled-off half of my laundry room. They are all over anybody who enters the room, nipping at shoes and trousers legs, fighting for attention. They are eating puppy food, and Maggie seems glad to get away from them whenever she can. Carl has made them a pen out back, so they can spend time outside now when the weather is nice. Yesterday we worked in the garden and took the puppies with us. One got out of the fence and immediately ran over and fell into a ditch filled with water. A little blow drying and she was good as new.
If all goes as planned, one of the puppies is going to be a celebrity. She is going as an ambassador from Cedar Lake Home Health and Hospice, to the Second Chance Prom being held in Athens next month, to raise funds for Athens teachers to buy extra supplies for their classrooms. And I hope she brings a pretty penny. She should. I did another search for Jack Shitz (new readers: these are Jack Russell and Shih tzu) puppies. I found an ad for some for sale in England for 300 pounds. That’s right at $484. The picture looked just like our puppies, and the mom looked like Maggie, though of course not nearly as beautiful. Another thing I discovered is that if you type in Jack Shih, you find even more mentions of them. I guess that is what proper people call them.

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010


Services for Evelyn Moore, 84, of Palestine were held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16, 2010, at Bailey & Foster Chapel, Palestine with Bro. Ray Prince officiating. Burial followed in Malakoff Cemetery. Arrangements were under the direction of Bailey & Foster Funeral Home, Palestine.
Mrs. Moore died Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010, at Greenbrier Nursing Home. She was born April 30, 1925, in Athens to Jesse Lee and Ruby McGregor Cook. Mrs. Moore was a homemaker and a member of the Westwood United Methodist Church.
Mrs. Moore was preceded in death by her parents, her husband Amon F. Moore, Sr., a son Amon F. Moore, Jr., granddaughter Shelia Hutchison, and a sister Ruby Hammack.
She is survived by her daughters, Fredia Woody and husband Jerry, Fern Collier and husband Butch all of Palestine; sister, Norma Crosswhite of Abilene; six grandchildren, Stephen Moore, Kim LeGard, Billy Hutchison, Kristi Mitchell, Glenna “Sissy” Lackey, and Kyle Collier; 20 great-grandchildren, and seven great-great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers were Beau Hutchison, Josh Lackey, Devin Lackey, Naithan Hutchison, Zachary Moore, Kevin Gailey and Dakota Mitchell. Honorary pallbearers were Stephen Moore, Bill Hutchison and Kyle Collier.
To view online, leave condolences or sign the guest book go to www.baileyandfosterfuneralhome.com

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010

I’m sorry to tell you there is no Reppond’s Roundup this week. My sister Mary didn’t quite get her column finished before her heart started beating really fast and she got very dizzy. She called her daughter Margaret and they got her to the hospital. By the time I saw her a few hours later, they already had her doing better, and she looked great. Today she looked even better, but they were still having a little trouble stabilizing things and were suggesting the possibility of a pace maker. However, while I was there, a nurse came in and took her blood pressure, and said her situation was looking much better. I personally don’t think she is going to have to have a pacemaker. We old Sims girls are tough.
Otherwise, it’s been rather quiet and boring. I’ve been staying home in my new jammies, working on books for the bookstore, playing with puppies, and trying to catch some mice.
Well, there was one exciting thing. I met the adoptive mother of one of Maggie’s pups. Her name is Pat Bickley, who lives somewhere between Jacksonville and Palestine. She and her sister were having lunch in Ben Wheeler at the same time my niece Margaret and her husband Pat were. They got to talking, and somehow it got around to dogs. Pat said she would like to have a Jack Russell Terrier, or some little lap-type dog. Margaret said something like, “Boy, do I have a deal for you.” Pat called and asked if she could come see them, and would I like to meet her in town for lunch. I told her I didn’t want to get out of my jammies, but I had some good leftovers. She accepted and we had a great visit over warmed-over chicken spaghetti. Pat is a really delightful person, who is going to spoil that puppy rotten. We chattered away like we’d known one another for years. The picture you see here of her and her puppy was taken with her iPhone. She left the house and headed straight for PetSmart where she bought it a car booster seat and a toy. I didn’t know they made dog booster seats.
Monday: Pat came by today to see her puppy. I was in Athens visiting Mary, but Carl was there, and they had a big time playing with the puppies. She had brought the booster seat for me to see, but since she missed me, she left its box so I could see the picture on it. The idea is to let little dogs look out the window.
Mouse update: Since I got the high powered new traps, I haven’t caught a mouse, either in them or in the traps I already had. And I’ve only seen one. These little suckers are smart. They are laying low. I don’t think it will last, however.
Mouse update update: This morning one of the older traps looked sprung, but you can’t see in it-you have to open it to see if you have a captive. I opened it over a bucket, and guess what-the mouse never made it to the bucket-he made a big jump and was gone. Still nothing in the new live trap. Nothing in the zapper, either, but that might be because I hadn’t hooked it up. But tonight, I put four AA batteries in it, spread peanut butter on the back door, clicked the “on” button and watched the green light flash to tell me it’s a go. In the morning, if there is a flashing red light, I will know a mouse has gone to meet his maker. I wouldn’t like to be in his shoes. He is going to have a lot to answer for.

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010

By Michael V. Hannigan

Jake’s Skate Park is going to be something special.

A representative of Hardcore Shotcrete Skateparks Inc. was in town this week to discuss the revolutionary design of the park and receive input from area residents.

The park is the idea of Tom and Estella Lyon and is in memory of their late son, Jake Ward. He was killed in an automobile accident in Dallas six years ago. Jake was 18 and driving under the influence at the time. {{more}}

The Lyons donated $100,000 to the city for the park in September. The couple says they want to build the park for area youth to give them an option other than drugs and alcohol.

As their vision continued to move forward this week it became apparent this is not just a concrete half pipe we’re talking about – although that element is in the design.

At two separate meetings Tuesday, Tyler Woods of Hardcore explained to adults and students, non-skaters and skaters alike that the park design is “cutting edge.”

“It is very rare to see a town this size build a park like this,” he said.

The park – which will measure about 130 feet long and 38 feet wide – blends two separate skating styles: plaza and transition.

While Woods used terms like “gap the hip” and “grind the edge” and “multiple lines,” in layman’s terms Jake’s Skate Park will blend plaza elements such as a bench, stairs and railings, with transition elements such as the half pipe.

“It gives a good mix where everyone can have fun on it,” Woods said.

The park will also offer several replicas of famous skating obstacles, such as the marble bench in Las Vegas.

Woods said Hardcore is ready to go and could finish the park in about three months. The next step, however, is up to the Malakoff City Council.

Last week, the council approved Hardcore as the project contractor but tabled signing an actual contract until after the city’s lawyer had reviewed the document.

Hardcore’s bid for the park was $115,000. Mr. Lyon suggested the city enter into a contract with Hardcore to build the skatepark for $125,000; leaving room for overruns or additions. He said he and his wife would guarantee $115,000, with the rest to come from contributions.

Anyone wishing to make a tax-exempt contribution to help the Friends of the Skate Park can do so through City Hall and the Malakoff City Administrator’s Office.

You can learn more about the project at www.jakesskatepark.com.



On the web:
www.jakesskatepark.com

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010

By Michael V. Hannigan

There is now a price tag for saving the Old Rock Building: $3 million.

According to the architect, that is the projected cost of turning the now unused building into a 10-classroom wing for the elementary campus, including eight classrooms for Pre-K and Kindergarten and two larger rooms that could be used for specialty classes such as a computer or science lab.

According to Superintendent Dr. John Spies, the cost is “turn-key” and includes fees and contingencies. {{more}}

“It would be finished and ready for kids,” he said.

Spies said a 15-year bond for the project could be paid for by raising the tax rate one penny. The district funded a 2008 renovation bond for the middle school and high school in the same way.

“The bottom line is that for every penny we can get $3 million,” Spies said.

The cost was discussed last week during a meeting of the school board’s facilities committee – plus members of the administration and teachers from Malakoff Elementary School – with a representative from Huckabee & Associates, Inc.

Huckabee is a specialist in renovating old schools and was hired in August to determine if there is a way the district can use the building, and if so what it would cost for the necessary renovations.

The plan and the calling of a bond election to pay for the renovation is expected to be on the school board’s agenda for its February meeting, said Spies. The school board was set to discuss the issue this week after The News had already gone to press, but no action was expected.

A bond election could mark the beginning of the end of the three-year controversy over the fate of the Rock Building. In 2007, the school board voted to have the building demolished, a course of action which was actually decided upon during the planning phase for the new elementary school. Activists then staged a campaign to save the historically significant building, forcing debate mainly over a plan to let the Malakoff Historical Commission turn the Rock Building into a museum and library.

Several board members, however, were uncomfortable with the idea of allowing an outside entity to control property so close to the elementary school. So last August, the board decided on the current course of action.

In a twist, one issue many Rock Building activists scoffed at during the three-year debate could wind up saving the building: Growth. The elementary campus needs more classrooms.

Many activists said they did not believe the campus would need to expand; which is understandable considering the original plan for expansion included getting rid of the Rock Building. However, according to school officials, the number of students at the campus has grown 25 percent since 2007. Even for those at the district who believed expansion was inevitable, the speed of the growth is a surprise.

“It was totally unpredictable,” said Spies. “We are going to have to add on or renovate.”

Renovating the Rock Building would be a little more expensive overall than adding a new wing to the main building, because a new wing wouldn’t need to be as large as the Rock Building, Spies said. Bringing the Rock Building online would increase the classroom space at the campus by almost a third and give the elementary campus additional space to grow in the long run.

The renovation would also allow the elementary campus to add a science lab to the main building.

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010

By Michael V. Hannigan

Some crooks are so low, so slimy, and so treacherously nasty that they would steal a ball right out of child’s hand: a baseball or a softball.

Young baseball and softball players are exactly who were victimized when someone – or more than one – stole the copper wire out of the light fixtures at the youth baseball fields on Star Harbor Road.

The crime was discovered earlier this month – although no one is sure just when it occurred because the lights haven’t been turned on since the last ball game last season. {{more}}

I talked to the Malakoff police officials who said two men were arrested near Trinidad recently while trying to steal copper. Local police will be following up with that lead although truthfully, because of the nature of the crime, it will be hard for them to catch those responsible for the local theft without a confession or some help.

So if you have any information regarding this, please contact the Malakoff Police Department at 903-489-0521.
Unfortunately, even if the culprits are caught tomorrow it won’t restore the lights at the field.

The fields and the lights belong to the City of Malakoff, so I spoke with City Administrator Ann Barker and Public Works Director Tim Whitley. They said the city’s insurance does not cover the theft.

Which means the city will have to deal with the repairs on its own.

Mr. Whitley inspected the damage with an electrician, and although the city hasn’t gotten an estimate yet, Mr. Whitley said, “It’s going to be expensive.”

When most people think of the fields they think of the Malakoff Teenage Baseball/Softball Association, which supports nearly 20 baseball and softball teams each year. This year, the organization sent teams to the Texas Teenage Baseball State Tournament for the fourth consecutive year. Malakoff has also played host to several district tournaments and has hopes of one day hosting the state tournament.

I will continue to follow this story as it develops.



Word comes from Friend of The News Benny Rogers that Malakoff ISD Athletic Director Jamie Driskill has been nominated for the 2009 All-Smoaky.com High School Coach of the Year.
Smoaky.com is the East Texas sports site and forum run by journalist David Smoak.
The blurb about Coach Driskell on the voting site reads: “After the program went 1-19 in previous two seasons, Driskell led the Tigers to their first district title since 1998, first playoff appearance since 2006, and first win against Kerens (23-16) since 1991, and the co-champions of District 14-2A.”
Vote for coach Driskell by going to http://www.smoaky.com/forum/index.php?showforum=123.
Voting will end 2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 25.



HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Jeanie Seely sends birthday wishes to Michelle Atwell, who will be 55 on Jan. 28. Michelle works at Jeanie Seely State Farm Insurance in Malakoff and her husband, Tom, is a pastor.
Happy birthday, Michelle!



If you have something you’d like to add to Editor’s Notebook email me at malnews@embarqmail.com, contact me through our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/themalakoffnews, or drop us a line at 815 E. Royall Blvd., Suite 6, Malakoff TX, 75148.

Jan

25

Posted by : admin | On : January 25, 2010

Special to The News

Vincent Laadrain Dawson, 30, of Malakoff was sentenced last week to 20 years for a December 2008 sexual assault committed in an apartment complex in Malakoff.

Dawson pled guilty as a result of a plea bargain before Judge Carter Tarrance in the 392nd District Court on Jan. 13. Tarrance passed sentence following Dawson’s guilty plea.

Dawson also pled guilty to an assault on a public servant charge and was sentenced to 10 years. The assault on a public servant charge stemmed from a June 15 assault on a jailer who was escorting Dawson back to his jail cell. Dawson was in jail for the sexual assault charge at the time of the assault. {{more}}

DA Scott McKee indicated that he was pleased with the sentence and thanked the investigators involved in the case.
“This was a case that boiled down to the victim’s statement and the DNA collected from the defendant,” he said in a press release. “The investigators and the DNA lab technicians from the Department of Public Safety did a great job in helping us prepare the case for prosecution. I am glad he is off our streets.”