Dec

10

Posted by : admin | On : December 10, 2009

From Staff Reports

For the sixth consecutive year, Stace Smith Pro Rodeos in Henderson County was named the Stock Contractor of the Year at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

The award was presented last Wednesday night at the South Point Hotel, Casino and Spa in Las Vegas. Smith earned the award over four other contractors.

Voting is by all contract personnel (announcers, pickup men, etc.), along with the stock contractors, rodeo committees (one vote per committee) and the top 100 contestants in each event.

Smith has been a rodeo contestant, worked as a chute boss and was also a pickup man before becoming a stock contractor. In 2005, he was chosen as pickup man for the Texas Circuit finals.

The longtime Henderson County resident is only the second man to receive the Stock Contractor of the Year this many times; Harry Vold won 10 straight Stock Contractor of the Year Awards and 11 overall in the 1980s and 1990s.

This year, Vold received the 2009 “Legend of ProRodeo” Award for his contribution. Vold, 84, was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 1994.

In May, Smith became part of the ownership group, Camelot Sports and Entertainment LLC., which purchased the historic Mesquite Championship Rodeo.

Camelot purchased the rodeo May 1 from an affiliate of the Hicks Sports Group, a company owned by Tom Hicks, owner of the Texas Rangers and the Dallas Stars. At that time they shut down the rodeo in order to improve the rodeo, including the addition of two state-of-the -art color jumbo video boards, new pens, and renovated suites.

Stace Smith Pro Rodeos is responsible for producing the rodeo.


Dec

10

Posted by : admin | On : December 10, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Malakoff ISD officials this week discussed a plan which could convert the Old Rock Building into a home for Pre-K and Kindergarten students.

Monday, a committee composed of board members, administration and teachers met with representatives from the architectural firm Huckabee & Associates, Inc. Huckabee, a specialist in renovating old schools, was hired after the school board voted in August to determine if there is a way the district can use the building, and if so what it would cost for the necessary renovations. {{more}}

The plan discussed this week would include updating the building to house 10 classrooms: four each for Pre-K and Kindergarten, and two larger classrooms that could be used for specialty classes such as a computer or science lab.

Josh Brown from Huckabee listed several instances where the building would have to be upgraded to meet state and federal requirements. He also told the committee there was water damage in places, but he could not determine the extent of the damage until after a closer inspection of the building.

Monday’s meeting was an early step in the process following preliminary work by Huckabee and did not include a cost for the project. Huckabee is expected to return to the committee in January or February with another update and a cost.

When the committee is satisfied with the plan, it will be presented to the full school board. It is expected at that time that the renovation project will be packaged as a bond issue and presented to voters.

The district has been debating the fate of the Old Rock Building since 2007, when a board decision to have it demolished created controversy.

In other MISD Facilities Committee action, the committee is expected to recommend to the full school board to move forward with having the district’s maintenance department turn the old Middle School Band Hall into a boy’s locker room. It will also recommend the district resurface the track.

The school board at its next meeting, Dec. 17, will also discuss a timeline for selling the next $3 million in bonds to start on high school projects: the stadium, tennis courts, two science labs, and renovations to the existing building.

Dec

10

Posted by : admin | On : December 10, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Cleaning out the notebook following one holiday and looking forward to the best holiday

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009

Thank you to all our online readers who noticed our site hadn’t been updated in a while. Actually, it was just last week that wasn’t updated, but when you only post once a week missing a posting can cover a long period.

I missed last week because I was on vacation, visiting family up north.

I have also started a Facebook page for The Malakoff News which has posts not only from me, but from some of our readers, much more often. Stories do not get posted there, however. You can visited us there at www.facebook.com/themalakoffnews.

Have a Merry Christmas,
Michael V. Hannigan, Editor

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009

Roughly, very roughly, the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics says that in a closed system disorder increases. Energy must be put into a system to decrease disorder and increase order.
For example, in the early days of The United States energy was put into the system and order increased. Men like Carnegie, Rockefeller and Ford took disordered raw material, iron ore and oil, and with the application of energy turned these raw materials into steel, railways, roads and cars and brought order to the young nation. Lumberjacks cut down trees and carpenters built houses and by putting energy into the system increased order.
It may be that the order they brought was not universally appreciated but it was order none-the-less. It is also true that the early industrialists took energy from the system in the form of money, mansions, yachts and race horses resulting in some disorder but on the whole they added more order than they took away.
The United States became an industrial giant and raw disorganized materials were turned into radios, washing machines and toasters. By the time of World War II America was The Arsenal of Democracy and its energy was focused on defeating the Axis.
But sometime in the 1950s the balance between order and disorder changed. Instead of making money from the order produced by the input of American energy, the industrial and marketing sector began making money by inputting the cheaper overseas energy and the order was increased there.
In the financial sector energy in the form of money was taken out of the system leaving disorder in its place.
The purpose of education is to increase the order in the students’ minds. This is accomplished by the input of energy from the teachers, the schools and the students themselves.
I suggest asking a student what they learned last semester and seeing if their minds have been ordered. I suggest looking at an algebra book and seeing if it orders or disorders a student’s understanding.
The purpose of research should be to increase understanding in an area of human interest by applying energy and increasing order.
But more and more the purpose of research is getting grants and the promotion of the researcher. The number of journals grows like Topsy and the co-authors of a paper often fill half of a page because promotions and grants depend on published papers.
The result is disorder.
It is a patriot imperative for citizens to put some energy into the system.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy noticing that the street by his house seems to have more pot-holes than last week.

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009

A lesson in Government; Young Chuck in Montana bought a horse from a farmer for $100. The farmer agreed to deliver the horse the next day. The next day the farmer drove up and said, “Sorry son, but I have some bad news

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009


Services for Jessie Doman “JD” Cason, 97, of Malakoff, were held 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29, 2009, under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home, Malakoff. Interment was at Malakoff Cemetery.
Mr. Cason died Friday, Nov. 27, 2009, in Malakoff. He was born Oct. 31, 1912, in Malakoff to the late Edward P. Cason and the late Della C. Donaldson.
He was a carpenter and a member of Odd Fellows and the local Masonic Lodge.
He was preceded in death by parents, Edward and Della Cason; wife, Lorene Cason; brothers, Raymond Cason, Edward Cason; sisters, Ruth McClain, Opal Robinson, Lois McClain; son, JD Cason, Jr.
Survivors include son, Jimmy L. Cason; grandchildren, Kevin Cason and Janet Cason.

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009


Mansfield – James Robert Dee “Bobby” Rounsavall, 70, Mansfield, passed away on Saturday, Nov. 28, 2009, at his home. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, at 11 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Trinidad.
Interment followed at the Athens Cemetery with military honors.
Bobby was born Oct. 15, 1939, in Athens to Robert Jackson and Velma Lawson Rounsavall.
He was a 1958 graduate of Athens High School and retired from Shell Oil Company in 1997. Bobby worked in international consulting for Rounsavall Consulting until the time of his death. Throughout his life he was committed to working with youth, both through his children’s activities and in the community at large. He served as Boy Scout Troop leader, coached Little League baseball, basketball and football, and was the leader of the Methodist Youth Fellowship in Trinidad. His many civic contributions include serving as a board member of the Trinidad United Methodist Church and Building Committee, was a 12-year member of the Trinidad School Board, Henderson County Hospital Board, Trinidad Jaycees and the Texas Jaycees. He proudly served his country in the U.S. Navy aboard the U.S.S. Saratoga. Above all else he was dedicated to his family and friends.
He was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Ann Bradshaw Rounsavall of Mansfield; daughter and son-in-law, Amy and James Duran of Wyoming; son, Chad Rounsavall of Mansfield; grandchildren, Jamie and Adam Keel of Houston; Jennifer Duran of Houston; Kellan and Hannah Rounsavall of Mansfield; siblings Annelle Denison, Sue Henry, Johnny Rounsavall, Barbara and Mike Green, Mary and Rick Surratt; numerous nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.
Pallbearers were lifelong friends, Larry Gideon, Kelly Smith, Adron Neill, Jerry Ramsey, Kenneth Atkins, and nephew Tracy Rounsavall.
Family received condolences on Tuesday evening from 6-8 p.m. at the Cooper Funeral Home of Athens.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made in Bobby’s name to Trinidad United Methodist Youth Fellowship, P.O. Box 444, Trinidad, Texas, 75163 or the Lance Armstrong Foundation, Attention: Helen Knost, 2201 East 6th St., Austin, Texas 78702.

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009


Memorial services for Peggy Walker Hedrick, 77, of Arlington, were held 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2009, at Tomlinson Funeral Home with Josh McDonald and Frank Upchurch officiating. Interment was at Malakoff Cemetery.
Mrs. Hedrick died Saturday, Nov. 21, 2009, in Arlington. She was born Feb. 17, 1932, to the late Elvert Nelson Walker and the late Nina May Roberts Walker
She was preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Les Hedrick.

Dec

04

Posted by : admin | On : December 4, 2009


Services for James L. Staten, 72, of Malakoff, died Friday, Nov. 20, 2009, in Tyler. He was born May 9, 1937, in Danville, Ark., to the late John Staten and Willie Staten.
He was a long haul truck driver and retired from the U.S. Navy.
He was preceded in death by his parents and grandson, Matthew Aaron Hornback.
Survivors include wife, Peggy Staten; daughters, Candy Croix, Dawn Fletcher; sisters, Janie Robinson, Fay Tolbert, Betty Harmon, Marrell Hall; brother, BJ Staten; grandchildren, Tabatha Fletcher, Brady Fletcher, Keaton Fletcher, Adam Hornback; great-grandchildren, Dee Hornback, Kinsey Hornback, Kennedee Fletcher.