Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

The jokes today came from a book copywrited in 1945 by Bennett Cerf.

“I’ll make a new sport coat for you,” agreed an overworked tailor, “but it won’t be ready for 30 days.” – “THIRTY DAYS!” protested the customer. “Why, the Lord created the entire world in six days.” – “True,” said the tailor. “And have you taken a good look at it lately.”

The Senator from Kentucky tells the story about the race track patron who charged up to the ticket window three times to place heavy bets on Blue Bell in the fourth race. When he appeared at the window for a fourth time, an onlooker tapped him on the shoulder. “Brother,” he said, “I reckon this ain’t any of my business, but if I was you, I wouldn’t be risking all that money on Blue Bell. He ain’t gonna win that fourth race.” – “Says you,” jeered the bettor. “How d’ya figure that out all by yourself?” – “Well, if you most know,” responded the other, “I happen to own Blue Bell and I jes’ know he ain’t going to win that race.” – “Mebbe so,” he allowed, “but if that is a fact, all I can say is it is going to be a mighty slow race. I own the other four horses.”

When Tony’s wife passed away, he was almost inconsolable. At the cemetery he almost collapsed with grief; in the carriage riding back to New York his whole frame shook with wild sobs. “Now, now, Tony,” soothed his friend. “It really is not so bad. I know it is tough now, but in six months maybe you will find another beautiful bambina and first thing you know you will get married again.” – Tony turned to him in a rage. “Six months!” he shouted. “What am I going to do tonight?”

A Madison Avenue bus was unusually crowded one morning. A passenger sitting next to the window suddenly buried his head in his arms. The man next to him asked, “Are you sick? Can I do anything for you?” – “It’s nothing like that,” the other assured him. “I just hate to see old ladies standing.”

A man and his wife were sitting together in the living room one evening. The phone rang and the man answered. He said, on the phone, “How on earth should I know? Why don’t you call the Coast Guard?” The wife asked, “Who was that dear?” The husband said, “I haven’t the faintest idea. Some silly jerk wanted to know if the coast was clear.”

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009


Services for Sidney Charles Chandler, Sr., 73, of Corsicana, were held 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009, at Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Corsicana with the Rev. Donald Lacey officiating. The eulogist was Atrum Crittendon. Interment followed at Woodland Cemetery in Corsicana.
Mr. Chandler died Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2009, in Corsicana.
Arrangements were under the direction of Scott Funeral Home in Corsicana.

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009


Reba Frances Wathen 96, of Houston, passed away Aug. 7, 2009.
Mrs. Wathen was born on Nov. 15, 1912, in Cross Roads, Texas to Henry and Avy (Scott) Derden. She had been a resident of the Houston area for 13 years and was a member of St. Cyril of Alexandria Catholic Church in Houston.
When Mrs. Wathen was not busy taking care of her family she enjoyed teaching religion (she was the first president of Alter Society at St. Edwards Catholic Church), raising cattle, baking (especially chocolate pies), sewing, reading and most of all spending time with her family. She was a very caring and loving woman who will be missed by all who knew her.
Mrs. Wathen is preceded in death by her parents, Henry and Avy Derden; and her loving husband of 44 years, James R. Wathen Sr.
Survivors include her daughter, Peggy Ruth Wathen; daughter, Joan Maniscalco and husband Joseph; son, James Wathen Jr. and wife Jeanne; grandchildren, Michele Tyson and husband Michael, Lisa Hildebrand and husband Sam, Stephen Maniscalco and wife Jill, Angelica Marisella Wathen; great-grandchildren, Christopher Graham Tyson, Claire Tyson, Grace Tyson, Cole Hildebrand, Reed Hildebrand, Julia Maniscalco, Joseph Maniscalco, Lauren Maniscalco and many other relatives and friends.
A visitation for family and friends was held at St. Cyril of Alexandria Catholic Church in Houston on Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2009 from 5-7 p.m. with a rosary at 6 p.m. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2009, 9:30 a.m. at St. Cyril of Alexandria Catholic Church and burial followed in Athens Cemetery in Athens.
Arrangements were under the direction of Sterling-White Funeral Home of Highlands, Texas. To send the family condolences online please visit www.sterlingwhite.com

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

The debate over The Old Rock Building came to the Malakoff City Council chambers Monday night.

Three city business owners spoke to the council during its regular monthly meeting asking the city to step out in support of saving the building.

“That building stands as an icon to anyone traveling that road coming into Malakoff,” said Ricky Armstrong, owner of Booger Hill Mercantile. {{more}}

While only three people spoke, many more, including several of the city’s antique dealers, were at the City Council meeting to lend support to the speakers.

Since early 2007, the fate of the old Malakoff Elementary School – locally known as The Old Rock Building – has been at the center of a controversy.

The Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees voted to tear down the building, located next to the current Malakoff Elementary School, in February 2007. Since that time, activists including the Malakoff Historical Commission have fought for a chance to save the structure.

Plans to allow the Historical Commission to turn the building into a museum have been discussed, with the latest deadline set for Sept. 1. In December, trustees said the Historical Society could have the building as long as it was moved off school property by that date.

Historical Society officials, however, have said they do not have the money to move the building, setting up a showdown between activists dedicated to saving the structure and the majority of the board who believe the building should not be given away if it can’t be moved.

The school board is scheduled to meet Monday, Aug. 17, at 7 p.m. in the administration building on Star Harbor Road. Discussion regarding The Old Rock Building is expected to be on the agenda that night.

This week, activists said they were looking for the City Council to take a stand to save the building, even though they said they knew the council has no authority over the building or Malakoff ISD.

“I don’t know why the city would not get behind this,” said Janet Brown, owner of Lindy Mall. “It could bring our community together.”

Randy Norwood, of Randy’s Exxon, said the city “could be a partner” in saving the building.

“We are just asking for the city to be open to what might happen in the next few months,” he said.

All three said a museum in The Old Rock Building could help bring much needed tourism to the city.

Because the issue was not officially on Monday’s agenda – all three business owners spoke during an open forum – the council could not take any action. Following the meeting, the city’s attorney Hank Skelton said any position taken by the council would require a vote during a future meeting.

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Following a lengthy – and sometimes loud – executive session Monday night, the Malakoff City Council agreed to create a new position in the police department: Investigator/Senior Sgt.

The position is expected to be filled by longtime Malakoff Police Department Sgt. Floyd Thomas.

The city has been without an investigator for several years because of budget cuts. The new position comes courtesy of the Crime Control and Prevention District voters approved last November, which calls for raising the sales tax rate three-eights of a penny to fund various police programs. {{more}}

Monday, Delanda Johnson spoke to the council about the position, saying that she wanted to make sure that Thomas did not lose his job if the investigator position was eliminated in the future.

“I don’t want anyone losing his job if the investigator position is lost,” she said.

She also said she would like to see Thomas get a higher rank and an increase in pay.

“With as many years of service as he has there should be some type of gain, not just staying the same,” she said.
Johnson is a member of the Crime Control and Prevention Board of Directors, but said she was speaking on her own behalf Monday evening.

The council decided to discuss the investigator position’s salary during upcoming budget talks.

In other action:
– The council set four dates for budget workshop meetings: Aug. 18, 20, 25, and 27. All four meetings are scheduled to start at 6 p.m.
– Approved an ordinance to establish a $1,000 plus dumpster cost fee for demolishing residences in the city.
– Agreed to continue participation with the steering committee of cities served by Oncor Electric, and authorized the payment of .10 cents per capita to the steering committee.
– Approved a resolution between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Corp. regarding the company’s rate review mechanism.

At the meeting, Malakoff Police Chief Billy Mitchell released the department’s activity report for July, including:
– Service calls: 94
– Offense reports: 28
– Arrests: 17
– Agency assist: 23
– Citizen assist: 89
– Accidents: 0
– Citations: 104
– Warnings: 23
– Alarms: 16
– Cases filed with District Attorney: 2
– Cases filed with County Attorney: 3
– Total Fuel: 674.8 gallons
– Total miles: 7,418

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

From Staff Reports

Season tickets for this year’s Malakoff Tiger football games will go on sale beginning Aug. 17 at the MISD Administration Building on Star Harbor Road. The price for season tickets is $30.

This year, the district will also be offering a Season Athletic Pass. The pass will enable the holder to all athletic events at Malakoff High School. The price is $75 for individuals or $125 for a family pass. The family pass allows entrance to two adults and their immediate family members. This year, the varsity schedule includes six home football games, 10 volleyball games, and nine basketball games – meaning the pass could provide a significant savings. {{more}}

These passes will be good for general admission seats only.
Admission at the gate for varsity and junior varsity games will be $5 for adults and $3 for children.

Free senior athletic passes may also be picked up at the Administration office.

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009


Private services will be held for J. Don Hustead, 73, of Malakoff. He went to be with the Lord Aug. 6, 2009. J. Don accepted Jesus Christ as his Lord and savior at 72 and was baptized at 73. Of all our Dad’s accomplishments, we are most proud of this – Janna and Jary.

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

Four adolescent guineas: $20.
Twenty pounds chick feed: $7.49.
Chick feeders: $15.16.
Eight fence posts: $25.52.
Roll of chicken wire: $64.99.
Making believe I’m a poultry farmer: Priceless.

Well, they are here. Eric delivered my guineas, then the next day delivered me a rabbit cage on loan until I can get something better for them.

They are presently in the rabbit cage on my deck outside my bedroom. The rabbit cage is a good size; the problem being it is divided into three sections. So to give them a little more breathing room, but still let them keep a snuggling buddy, I put two in two adjoining sections. They spend a lot of time beak to beak through the screen. Alternately, they walk around doing a funny back and forth thing with their heads, singing a curiously timid little tune.

I had fantasized about getting full-grown guineas who could take care of themselves, who I could turn loose immediately, and who would happily set about their job of eating squash bugs (when available) ticks and snakes. But Eric explained that younger guineas would be much more likely to stay with me. So that’s what we got. It wasn’t until they arrived at the farm and I saw the look in the eyes of the neighborhood dogs who think they live here that I knew I had a problem. Those dogs want to get those guineas. Maggie and Bingo do, too, but they can probably be reasoned with, and besides, I don’t think they could catch them.

Carl is going to build them a temporary pen this afternoon, while we figure out more permanent arrangements for them; probably in the pen where the chickens will go. There is a chain link fence around the back yard of the trailer house next door. After some repair, it will make a fine chicken yard. The idea is to have fresh eggs. I don’t think I could eat something I raised from a baby.

The bookstore is coming along great. If you missed the news, Randy Rader has bought and is remodeling the old building next to the Junk Palace on Terry Street. She is going to have a bookstore in the front and make her home in the back. I am going to supply most of the books. And believe me, I have the books. Tons of great books, just waiting to be shelved. Randy thinks we will be ready to do that in a week or two. There will be other neat stuff in there, too. Randy and I have been working feverishly to stock up on that. My workshop is full, and we still have more to go get. When I get my workshop space back, I will be looking for more books. So don’t toss out any good books before you call me.

I hope you will check the bookstore out as soon as it opens. It is going to be a fun place to visit, even if you don’t need a book.

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

Aug

13

Posted by : admin | On : August 13, 2009

From Staff Reports

With the debate over health care dominating recent public discourse, politicians took the issue to the people this week.

Congressman Jeb Hensarling spoke with Henderson County residents on Monday in Chandler, saying the health care system needs to be fixed, but not through the legislation recently approved by a House of Representatives committee.
“Many of the solutions to our most challenging health care problems can be found in places like Chandler, Brownsboro, Athens, and Seven Points rather than in Washington,” Hensarling said. {{more}}

Hensarling praised the Democrats for sharing his goal of quality, affordable health care for all Americans, but questioned the ultimate results of their proposals.

“If you like the way the government is running our banks, our mortgage companies, AIG and General Motors, you’ll love their takeover of your health care,” said Hensarling.
Hensarling wasn’t the only politician out talking this week. President Obama held a town hall meeting in Porstmouth, New Hampshire, Tuesday evening.

“So this is what reform is about?” the president asked. “For all the chatter and the yelling and the shouting and the noise, what you need to know is this: If you don’t have health insurance, you will finally have quality, affordable options once we pass reform. If you do have health insurance, we will make sure that no insurance company or government bureaucrat gets between you and the care that you need. And we will do this without adding to our deficit over the next decade, largely by cutting out the waste and insurance company giveaways in Medicare that aren’t making any of our seniors healthier.

“Under the reform we’re proposing, insurance companies will be prohibited from denying coverage because of a person’s medical history. Period,” he said. “They will not be able to drop your coverage if you get sick. They will not be able to water down your coverage when you need it. Your health insurance should be there for you when it counts – not just when you’re paying premiums, but when you actually get sick.”

As for Hensarling, when he served as chairman of the Republican Study Committee he commissioned a Health Care Task Force to develop a patient-centered health care reform plan. The task force developed the following principles that Hensarling said guides his approach to health care:
– Every American, regardless of health or financial status, should have access to affordable health care coverage of their choice. Nobody should go bankrupt because they get sick;
– Health care in America should be family-focused and patient-centered. It must put patients, in consultation with their doctors, in control of their health care. Your health care decisions should not be made by your employer, a health care plan selected by your employer, or the government;
– People should own and control their health care plan, and it should be personal and portable;
– Americans who are happy with their current plan should be allowed to keep it;
– Forcing Americans into a government health care program will not solve America’s health care challenges.

“Every American – no matter how sick they are and regardless of their financial status should have access to health care,”said Hensarling. “Americans should know that if they get sick, they can get the care they need, when they need it and that they won’t go bankrupt in the process.”

Hensarling said, “There is a fundamental decision being made in this debate over who will control health care in America. Will it be parents, families, and doctors? Or will it be Washington bureaucrats or insurance company accountants? I am ready to work together with colleagues on both sides of the aisle to deliver a health care program that works – but I cannot support a system that emphasizes cost over quality and chooses the opinion of the government over that of the physician.”

President Obama said, “The status quo is not working … And if we can set up a system, which I believe we can, that gives you options, just like members of Congress has options; that gives a little bit of help to people who currently are working hard every day but they don’t have health care insurance on the job; and most importantly, if we can make sure that you, all of you who have insurance, which is probably 80 or 90 percent of you, that you are not going to be dropped because of a preexisting condition, or because you lose your job, or because you change your job … if we can set up a system that gives you some security, that’s worth a lot.”