Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

The Malakoff Tigers season came to an end in Fairfield Friday night with a 51-41 loss to the Troy Trojans in the Area round of the playoffs.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009


Services for Phyllis Ramsey, 73, of Malakoff, were held 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009, at Trinity Baptist Church with Bro. Tommy Bolton and Bro. Floyd Loven officiating. Interment followed at Post Oak Cemetery under the direction of Tomlinson Funeral Home of Malakoff.
Mrs. Ramsey died Friday, Feb. 20, 2009, in Athens. She was born Jan. 4, 1936, in Dallas to the late Paul Huffman and Flora Dell Arnold. She was a housewife and a member of Trinity Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her husband, the late Raymond Ramsey; son-in-law, Quincy Hutchison.
Survivors include sons, Samuel and Jenny Ramsey of Trinidad, Raymond Jr. and Debbie Ramsey of Malakoff, David and Patty Ramsey of Payne Springs, William and Lynda Ramsey of Trinidad; daughter, Susan Hutchison of Malakoff; sister, Paula Mullican of Malakoff; nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers were Danny Ramsey, Scott Ramsey, Kellan Ramsey, Jonathan Hutchison, Rusty Hutchison, Johnny Valdez, Shannon Ramsey, Jeff Wilson.
Honorary pallbearers were Charles Colman Jr., Bob Boone, Stephen Alvarado, Joe Mosier, Mike Colman, James Ritz.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009


Guy N. Johnson Jr., 75, of Trinidad, died Friday, Feb. 20, 2009, in Dallas. He was born July 30, 1933, in Miller Grove, Texas, son of the late Guy N. and Connie Johnson. He was retired from Dallas Parks and Recreation after 33 years of service. He also served as treasurer for the Log Cabin Swingers Square Dance Club.
Surviving are daughters, Mary and husband, Robert Potter, of Frisco, Texas, Laurie and husband, Jordan Dunlap, of Crandall; grandchildren, Stephanie, Christina and William Potter, Jared and Jordan Dunlap; numerous nieces and nephews.
He was preceded in death by parents, Guy and Connie Johnson; wife, Laura Gene Johnson; brothers, Thomas S., Charles H., and Robert Lewis Johnson.
Services were held at Tomlinson Funeral Home at 11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 23, 2009. Interment followed at Miller Grove Cemetery.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009


Gerald “Jerry” Eugene Hinkle, 66, was born March 21, 1942, in Cleburne, Texas, to E.O. “Gene” and Berta Corpany Hinkle. He graduated from Cleburne High School in 1960 and married Barbara Travis on Nov. 16, 1963. Mr. Hinkle graduate from Dallas Institute of Mortuary Science, Gupton Jones in 1968. Mr. Hinkle later received his Bachelors of Business degree. He was a Funeral Director, Mortician for over 40 years and retired in 2009 as a License Nursing Facilities Administrator.
He is survived by his loving wife, Barbara Hinkle; daughters, Sheree Hinkle Hill and husband Ron of Burleson, Texas, Angela Hinkle Flores and husband Chriss of Burleson; grandchildren, Travis Kleypas, Tabitha Hill, Ryan Hill, Jacob Hill, Aimee Hill, Mathew Flores, Michael Flores and a sister, Judi McNabb, of Cleburne, Texas.
Services were 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2009, at Mountain Valley Funeral Home in Joshua, Texas.
In lieu of flowers please send donations to Pleasant Hill Children Home, PO Box 1177, Fairfield, Texas, 75240.
Arrangements are under the direction of Waxahachie Funeral Home.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

The summer that I was 18 I had a job at a private swimming pool in Arlington, Virginia. It was my last cushy summer job.
Two lifeguards sat in high chairs on each side of the pool and once an hour they would clear the pool, take a break and dive off their high chairs into the pool.
This particular early afternoon one the lifeguards ended his dive by breaking a tooth on the bottom of the pool. I was appointed to drive him to his home in Washington, D.C.
He lived in a neighborhood of red brick row houses. The streets were lined with trees and parked cars. There was just enough room for cars going in opposite directions to pass.
We were headed for the other end of the block but our passage was prevented by two of those cars going in opposite directions that had stopped so that their drivers could talk.
I would have waited until I was noticed and maybe said, “Pardon me but would you mind moving your car.”
My passenger took matters in hand, leaned out the window and yelled, “Get your ****** car out of the road.”
“Stuff it, jerk,” was the immediate reply, more or less.
After a few loud threats and curses, the car in front of us moved ahead and pulled into the other lane and stopped. The driver got out and I thought there was going to be a fight but he and my passenger just did more yelling and I drove away.
This was my introduction to communication by yelling. What I had witnessed were not fighting words but a form of communication.
In 1984 I went to a music store on Times Square. It was long and narrow with a balcony on one side behind which were their instruments.
All communication was via the raised voice, that is, yelling.
“Throw down a Les Paul.”
“I need a Gibson RB50.”
Yelling is often a very effective way to transmit your thoughts. Contrary to the invective, “Don’t yell, ‘fire!’ in a crowded theater,” the most rational way to get the news of the fire out is to yell, “Fire.” The problem lies in the irrational response of the theater audience.
When I was in grammar school we had fire drills while we were in class and were told to react calmly but with all deliberate speed. We never had a fire drill during an assembly. It was the perfect place to practice responding to “Fire,” yelled in a crowded theater but that practice never happened.
Students in the 1950s were taught to “duck and cover” a completely useless skill but not how to leave a crowded theater that was on fire, a much more survivable occurrence than a nuclear attack.
Here we see a failure of education. It is so much easier to make yelling “Fire” in a crowded theater illegal than to teach people how to exit a burning theater.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy thinking that the easy way with no chance of success is so often chosen over the hard way that has a chance of success.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson went on a camping trip. After a good meal and a bottle of wine they lay down for the night, and went to sleep. Some hours later, Holmes awoke and nudged his faithful friend awake. “Watson, look up and tell me what you see.” – Watson replied, “I see millions and millions of stars.” – “What does that tell you?” Holmes questioned. – Watson pondered for a minute. “Astronomically it tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, I observe that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three. Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful and that we are small and insignificant. Meteorologically, I suspect we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. What does it tell you?” – Holmes was silent for a minute, then spoke. “Watson, you idiot. Someone stole our tent!”

A couple was having their Sunday morning breakfast, when the wife went to get her Sunday church clothes on. When she returned, the husband was still in his bathrobe. “Aren’t you going to church this morning?” asked the wife. – “No, I’m not going this morning. In fact, I’m not going to church anymore at all.” – “What do you mean, we’ve gone to church for years, so why the change?” – He responded, “Look, there are people at that church who don’t like me, and frankly there are people at the church that I don’t like, and I’M NOT GOING!” – She answered back, “I’ll give you two good reasons why you need to go to church. One, you’re 42 years old. Two, you gotta go, you’re the preacher!”

A lady came into the kitchen, sat down at the table, leaned forward, put her head in her hands and said to her husband, “Honey, I feel terrible! My head hurts, my back hurts and my left breast just burns and burns.” He said, “I’m gonna help you, dear. I’ll get you some aspirins for the headache, and I’ll rub your back with Myoflex for the backache, and if you” sit up and get your breast out of the coffee, it’ll stop burning!”

I met someone in the elevator who was drinking coffee and complaining about how coffee made him nervous. I said why don’t you quit drinking coffee. He said, “Because if I didn’t have the shakes I wouldn’t get any exercise at all.”

The perfect woman. A young man finds the woman of his dreams and asks her to marry him. He tells his mother he wants her to meet his fianc

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009


Jack Cooley passed away on February 21, 2009, after a courageous battle with cancer.
Mr. Cooley was born on July 8, 1933, to Catherine and JC Cooley and raised in the West Texas mountains of Alpine with his siblings Carolyn Rutledge, George and Sam Cooley. He attended Sul Ross and Southwestern University. Mr. Cooley served his country in the Air Force during the Korean War. Mr. Cooley had a successful career as a national representative for Zollenor Pistons.
Mr. Colley loved to fish, golf, and do woodwork. He was also an avid fan of the Dallas Cowboys. Mr. Cooley was an active member of the Trinidad Methodist Church.
He loved his wife, Valerie, for 54 years and together they traveled and had a large circle of friends.
Mr. Cooley was adored by his children, Lynda Perry, Mike Cooley and Larry Cooley (deceased). He was grandfather to Jacob, Mathew, and Greg Cooley; Sam, Zak and Brook Perry. Mr. Cooley was also a great-grandfather to Jennifer & Allysa Cooley, and Corbin Perry.
Mr. Cooley will be remembered for his strong work ethic, his fun and easy going personality and gracious spirit. A memorial service will be held on Friday, February 27 at 11 a.m. at the Trinidad Methodist Church. Conributions in lieu of flowers may be made to the Trinidad Methodist Memorial Fund or the Cancer Society.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

According to the polls, President Barack Obama’s nationally televised speech was a winner Tuesday night. Talking heads said the President earned approval ratings from the high 60s to as high as 85 percent in a CNN poll.

Obama struck a hopeful tone in his first address to Congress.
“While our economy may be weakened and our confidence shaken; though we are living through difficult and uncertain times, tonight I want every American to know this: We will rebuild, we will recover, and the United States of America will emerge stronger than before,” he said. {{more}}

“The weight of this crisis will not determine the destiny of this nation. The answers to our problems don’t lie beyond our reach. They exist in our laboratories and universities; in our fields and our factories; in the imaginations of our entrepreneurs and the pride of the hardest-working people on Earth. Those qualities that have made America the greatest force of progress and

See SPEECH, Page 7A
prosperity in human history we still possess in ample measure. What is required now is for this country to pull together, confront boldly the challenges we face, and take responsibility for our future once more.”
Congressman Jeb Hensarling wasn’t among the fans of the speech, however.

“I am disappointed that after 15 bailouts, a $1.2 trillion bill to stimulate government, another $350 billion for an ill-defined TARP program, the President is defending even more spending,” said Henderson County’s congressman in a press release Tuesday. “The so-called ‘stimulus’ bill will cost every American household almost $10,000 and drown our children in a sea of red ink. No nation can borrow and spend its way to prosperity.”

On more than one occasion, Hensarling has said he likes the President and appreciates what he is trying to accomplish – they just disagree on the method.

“You cannot help the job seeker by punishing the job creator,” Hensarling said. “This is exactly the wrong time to be raising taxes on anyone, not the least of which are our small businesses who create new jobs in America. A new dollar sent to Washington to help fund earmarks and pet projects is a dollar that can’t be used for a paycheck or invested in a new small business.”

In his speech, Obama said he understands the viewpoint of people like Hensarling.

“As soon as I took office, I asked this Congress to send me a recovery plan by President’s Day that would put people back to work and put money in their pockets,” he said. “Not because I believe in bigger government – I don’t. Not because I’m not mindful of the massive debt we’ve inherited – I am. I called for action because the failure to do so would have cost more jobs and caused more hardships. In fact, a failure to act would have worsened our long-term deficit by assuring weak economic growth for years. That’s why I pushed for quick action.”

Whatever shape the next year takes, Obama said it is time to put aside partisan rancor.

“I know that we haven’t agreed on every issue thus far, and there are surely times in the future when we will part ways,” he said. “But I also know that every American who is sitting here tonight loves this country and wants it to succeed. That must be the starting point for every debate we have in the coming months, and where we return after those debates are done. That is the foundation on which the American people expect us to build common ground.”

Hensarling, for his part, seems ready to meet that call.

“I have met and like the President and it was a unique privilege to attend his first address to the joint session of Congress,” Hensarling said. “I will continue to work with him to try and find solutions to our economic turmoil.”

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

From Staff Reports

Pete Armando Ayala, 21, was arrested last Friday in connection with the shooting death of Johnny Lee Brown of Trinidad.

Ayala was arrested by Garland police officers at a McDonald’s restaurant and transferred to Henderson County Jail. He is being held for murder with bond set at $250,000.
Brown, 21, was found shot to death in the master bedroom of a residence at 1201 Leagueline Road in Trinidad Feb. 18. {{more}}

According to police reports, the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office received a call in reference to a gunshot victim in the Trinidad area about 7 p.m. last Wednesday. Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Investigators Michael Teel and Ceresa Ballard arrived at the scene to assist the Trinidad Police Department and found Brown.

Pct. 5 Justice of the Peace Tommy Barnett pronounced Brown dead and ordered the body to be transported to the Southwest Medical Center in Dallas for an autopsy.

Teal is heading the investigation for the sheriff’s department with the assistance of Texas Ranger Trace McDonald.

Feb

27

Posted by : Erik Walsh | On : February 27, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

An Austin consulting firm recently announced that Henderson County schools will receive close to $4 million thanks to the federal economic stimulus bill signed into law by President Barack Obama last week.

“The stimulus bill wheels are turning in D.C. and in Texas. Officials throughout the state are just waiting for guidelines about how to access the funding and how it can be spent,” said Mary Scott Nabers, president and CEO of Strategic Partnerships, Inc. (SPI). {{more}}

The money headed for Henderson County is less than first anticipated. Early in February, SPI reported county schools would get more than $7 million; however, education was one of the areas trimmed from the bill by Congress.

According to SPI, Malakoff ISD should receive about $585,000.

“The money coming in is for special education and Title I (at-risk students),” said MISD Superintendent Dr. John Spies. “I have heard it is funding to be spent over the next 14 months.”

Spies said the district has not decided where the money will be spent.

“I am waiting for the ‘strings’ to be announced and to find out when the money will be released,” he said. “We have to be careful to spend the money on one-time expenses and not ongoing cost. You don’t want to add staffing or other ongoing costs and then have the money go away.”

According to Nabers, some of the money is allocated by formula and other funds will come down to local school districts in the form of grants.

“School districts, receiving money to be directed to special programs, are expected to spend a large amount for technology, equipment, energy enhancement and construction,” she said.

According to SPI, other schools in the county will receive:
- Athens ISD: $1,433,000
- Brownsboro ISD: $885,000
- Cross Roads ISD: $205,000
- Eustace ISD: $481,000
- Lapoynor ISD: $154,000
- Murchison ISD: $90,000
- Trinidad ISD: $104,000