Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009

So I decided to move to Tempe Arizona. On Monday I loaded up my truck and Tuesday morning I left Albuquerque.
I had bought a tarp to cover my stuff in the back of the truck but decided not to use it. I have never used a tarp to successfully keep the rain off the bed of a truck nor have I tied it down well enough to keep it from flapping in the wind which is very annoying. Rather than again trying a course of action that had never worked, a sign of insanity, I left the tarp in the tool box.
It turns out that there are a lot of ways to drive from Albuquerque to Tempe and I chose a route that seemed the simplest.
I started by driving west on I-40 to Holbrook in Arizona. So far, so good. Except for many semis on the road and stretches of construction this part of the trip went well. And it wasn’t as though the Interstate didn’t need some construction.
At Holbrook I turned south to Show Low, a town that was apparently won by the turn of a card in some kind of poker game. Now the road was two lane but not much traffic; and it was paved.
At Show Low I went west to Payson which is in a forest of the pines left standing after the forest fires got done with them. On the way to Payson I hit rain but since I had already made up my mind to not worry about rain, I didn’t. So a few things got wet; no big deal.
From Payson I headed south again on the last leg of my trip. I went from Payson to Fountain Hills to Scottsdale to Tempe. No problemo.
My memory of Scottsdale was of a small desert town. In 1951 I was 16 and had mixed mortar in a tub that my uncle was using to build a cement block wall. We worked from 6 in the morning to 2 in the afternoon and then went a saloon where my uncle would buy me a cold beer. Scottsdale Road was a two lane road through the desert that had been laid down with a minimal use of a grader. I had never heard of Fountain Hills.
The six lane highway started in Forest Hills and was bumper to bumper going in both directions. It was filled with stoplights and the cross streets were clearly labeled with labels that meant nothing to me and the road I was on was not clearly labeled. I guess the road designers thought that if you were on this road you knew what the name of it was.
The road was lined on either side with what looked like multi-million dollar mansions built about ten feet apart. I have never understood why people would build a multi-million dollar mansion 10 feet away from another multi-million dollar mansion but I suppose they have their reasons.
Out of the corner of my eye I saw that I was on Scottsdale Road. Clearly Scottsdale Road had changed. A sign informed me that the next few blocks was “Old Scottsdale.” I suppose that the bar I passed was the saloon that my uncle and I had stopped in after work. It wasn’t the “Old Scottsdale” I remembered but memory is fickle.
But I did get to Tempe, at least the suburb of Phoenix that is called Tempe.
Thus Spake the Old Fogy, wondering where the towns of yesteryear are.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009

Some city boys were on a camping trip. As they sat around the campfire, mosquitoes began to bite them. “Let’s go inside the tents,” the counselor suggested. That night while everybody was sleeping, one of the boys woke up and nudged the counselor. “What’s wrong?” the counselor asked. The boy pointed to a group of fireflies “It’s those mosquitoes again, and this time they brought flashlights!”

The boss called one of his employees into the office. “Rob,” he said, “you’ve been with the company for six months. You started off in the mailroom. Just one week later, you were promoted to a sales position, and one month later you were promoted to district sales manager. Just four months later, you were promoted to vice president. Now it’s time for me to retire, and I want you to take over the company. What do you say to that?” “Thanks,” said the employee. “Thanks?” the boss replied. “That’s all you can say?” “Oh, sorry,'” the employee said. “THANKS, DAD.”

Herb had spent all afternoon interviewing for a new job. He began by filling out all the papers. The human-resources manager then questioned him at length about his training and past work experience. Herb was then given a tour of the plant and was introduced to the people he would be working with. Finally, he was taken to the general manger’s office. The manager rose from his chair, shook his hand, and asked him to sit down. “You seem to be very qualified,” he said, “and we would like you to come to work for us. We offer a good insurance plan and other benefits. We will pay you six hundred dollars a week starting today and in three months, we will raise it to seven hundred a week. When would you like to start?” “In three months,” Herb replied.

One Sunday morning, a man was pulled over by a motorcycle cop for speeding. As the officer asked the driver for his license and registration, passing motorists would slow down, then honk and wave. After the twelfth driver passed by, honking and waving, the officer asked the speeder what was going on. The driver told him, “I am the pastor at the church a mile down the road. That’s where I was going when you stopped me. The members of my congregation recognize me.” The officer smiled and tore up the ticket. “I think you have paid your debt to society,” he proclaimed.

The front door of Todd’s home warped, causing the door to jam on occasion. To pry it open, the family kept a hatchet handy. One day the doorbell rang. Todd peeked out through the curtains and then shouted in a voice that could be heard though the door, “Quick, Kevin, it’s the pastor. Get the hatchet!”

A man was visiting his alma mater. He paused to admire the newly constructed Shakespeare Hall. “It’s marvelous to see a building named for William Shakespeare” he commented to the tour guide. “Actually,” said the guide, “it’s named for Stephan Shakespeare. No relation.” “Oh, was Stephen Shakespeare a writer also?” the visitor asked. “Well, yes,” said his guide. “He wrote the check.”




Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009

By Britt Thompson
and Amanda Miles Thompson

From The Malakoff News
Friday, September 18, 1953

A fighting bunch of Tigers that woke up in the second half, neatly snatched a win from Class A Fairfield last Friday night, to the score of 12-6. The game was played in Fairfield.
The first quarter saw a see-saw battle from both sides, neither team playing the kind of football each was capable of doing. About the middle of the second period, Doug Whitesides of Fairfield, slammed across for the first touchdown of the game. Their try for the extra point was low.
Just before the half, Marcus Jordan, Tiger halfback, plunged across for a tally. This tied up the game, since Robert Cross’ point after touchdown failed to jell.
With the start of the third quarter, the Tigers came roaring in and it was their game the rest of the way, although they made only one more touchdown. This was late in the fourth period, with Jordan again carrying over. The Tigers elected to run the ball over for the extra point but were stopped cold by the Eagles.
Statistics showed the two teams fairly even, although Malakoff made nine first downs to Fairfield’s six. Both teams completed two passes each, and both had five incomplete. The Tigers intercepted two of Fairfield’s passes, while the Eagles intercepted one of Malakoff’s.
It was a remarkably clean-fought affair, and players on both sides are to be congratulated for the good sportsmanship shown. Very few penalties were assessed, and none for more than five yards at a time.
Outstanding for the Malakoff Tigers were Robert Brannon, Jordan, Robert Cross, Bill Smith, the Allen twins, and Kenneth Andrews. Several boys were playing their first real high school football last week and did amazingly well.
It looks very much like a winning season for the Tiger aggregation!
CONTRIBUTE TO LOOKING BACK! – If you have photographs, articles, or family histories that you would like to see in the Looking Back column, please contact Britt Thompson at the following email address: rbtnyu81@sbcglobal.net or mail to Britt Thompson, 7033 Blalock Drive, The Colony, Texas 75056. Photographs and text can be in any format.
DOWN MEMORY LANE – Click on the Down Memory Lane link. Share your memories as new pictures from Malakoff’s past are posted regularly.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009

What a nice day it is as I write this. The rain has stopped and all the plants are happy. My newly deposited fertile soil on the south side of my house is a nice medium brown color and very easy to dig in. Very easy to find and remove the bermudagrass sprigs I accidentally caused to be planted across the area I mean to have covered with flowers. I gathered a small flowerpot full this morning.
But that was last week’s chapter of my series

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009

Dorothy Juanita Waller, of Kemp, passed away in Athens, Sept. 10, 2009 at the age of 82. She was born in Trinidad, Nov. 5, 1926, to Henry Leamon and Bessie Bell Hellner Spicer. She is preceded in death by her parents, sister, and grandsons, Kevin Dale Waller and Robert Wesley Avant.
Survivors include her husband of over 63 years, Alvin Franklin Waller; sons, Leslie David Avant and wife Patricia Ann of Talty, Texas, Larry Eugene Waller and wife Alice Fay of Seagoville; daughter, Alvita Jo Johnson and husband William of Kemp; five grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; one great-great grandchild; brothers, Vernon Leamon Spicer and Gene Darrell Spicer and wife Jo Ann; plus numerous nieces, nephews, other family members, and a host of friends.
Services were held at 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 14, 2009, at Anderson Clayton Bros. Funeral Home in Kemp, with interment following in the Hamilton-Beeman Cemetery in Corisicana.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009


Services for Herbert Gross, Jr., 74, of Caney City, were held 11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2009, at Eubank Memorial Chapel with the Rev. John Chism officiating. Interment followed at Post Oak Cemetery under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Mr. Gross died Monday, Sept. 14, 2009, in Malakoff. He was born Feb. 18, 1935, in Almont, Tenn.
Mr. Gross had resided in Caney City for 35 years and was a veteran of the Army and Navy. Mr. Gross was Christian by faith and was a member of the VFW in Trinidad and a retired electrical journeyman.
Survivors include sister, Doris Worley; 11 nieces; numerous other family and many friends.
Pallbearers were Robert Thompson, Ralph Hester, Daniel Hester, William Thompson, Nathan Brown, and Bobby Rylant.
Honorary pallbearer was Gary Stanfield.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009


Services for Crandell Stegall, 91, of Eustace, were held 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10, 2009, at First Assembly of God Church Eustace with the Rev. James Howard officiating and under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Mr. Stegall died Monday, Sept. 7, 2009, in Athens. He was born July 23, 1918, in Henderson County, Texas.
Mr. Stegall had resided in Eustace all of his life and was a Master Mason at Eustace Lodge No. 1199. He was a carpenter.
Survivors include wife, Ruth Stegall of Eustace; sons, Bill Stegall of Payne Springs, Ronnie C. Key of Eustace, Dale R. Stegall and wife Reta of Florence, Colo., Terry G. Stegall of Eustace; daughters, Pat J. Couch and husband Steve of Greenville, Texas, Gail Hallaway and husband Danny of Athens; 21 grandchildren; 34 great-grandchildren; four great-great-grandchildren; sister, Maxine Yarborough of Tyler; other family members and many friends.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009


Services for A. E. Attaway, 81, of Enchanted Oaks, were held 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009, at Eubank Memorial Chapel with the Rev. Byron Jones officiating. Interment followed in Cedar Creek Memorial Park under the direction of Eubank Cedar Creek Funeral Home.
Mr. Attaway died Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2009, in Athens. He was born Aug. 5, 1928, in Miller County, Ark.
Mr. Attaway had resided in Enchanted Oaks for the last 26 years and was a teacher, principal, counselor and coach at all levels. Mr. Attaway also worked as a vocational and academic counselor and test coordinator.
Survivors include wife, Sue Attaway of Enchanted Oaks; sons, Thomas Attaway and wife, Nola, of Yakima, Wash., Michael Attaway and wife, Gina, of Laurel, Miss.; daughter, Susan Attaway of Enchanted Oaks; grandsons, Michael Attaway, Jr., Tyson Attaway, Daniel Attaway; granddaughters, Anna Attaway, Melody Attaway, Joy Attaway; sisters, Melba Butler of Texarkana, Jearlene Savell of Rio Ranch, New Mexico; Janie Collins of Texarkana.

Sep

17

Posted by : admin | On : September 17, 2009


Services for Don “Willie” Stearman, 51, Seabrook, Texas were held Sept. 15, 2009 at Tomlinson Funeral Home in Seven Points. Don was born June 25, 1958 and died Sept. 9, 2009 at his home surrounded by his family and friends. Don was preceded in death by his parents, Donnel & Jacquelyne Stearman. Survivors include his wife Ellen Stearman, 9 children, 4 grandchildren, 1 brother, 2 sisters and many other family members and dear friends. He was a hard worker and a plumber by trade. Don was raised in DeSoto, Tx., later in life moving to the Cedar Creek area, and then finally to Seabrook, Tx. He was a man full of life and enjoyed having and showing his friends a good time.Some of his many happy times were fishing, playing pool, riding motorcycles and singing. Don earned the nickname of Willie because his type of voice was so close to the same sound of Willie Nelson’s. It was sometimes hard to tell if it was Don or Willie singing. But his happiest time of all was being with his beloved wife, Ellen and just simply sitting with her and holding her hand. He was truly loved and will be greatly missed.

Sep

12

Posted by : admin | On : September 12, 2009

By Michael V. Hannigan

Tyler