Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

Sentator Nichols with Superintendents
Special to The News
AUSTIN–Sen. Robert Nichols (R-Jacksonville) met with school superintendents from around Senate District 3, June 28 to discuss items which will be addressed during the Special Legislative Session, beginning on July 18, 2017. In addition, they also discussed what occurred during the 85th Regular Legislative Session.
“As we head into the upcoming special session, many of the items which will be addressed are education related. I wanted to make sure I took the opportunity to discuss these important issues with the Superintendents from our local school districts,” said Senator Nichols.
Some of the items discussed included administrative flexibility, teacher pay increases, property tax reform, school vouchers and school finance reform.
“I do not believe the Legislature can successfully make good decisions, unless we are listening closely to those we represent,” said Nichols. “Education is and always will be one of the most important issues we face as a state.”
Senate District 3 represents 101 school districts throughout 19 counties including Henderson County.

Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

Special to The News
WACO–There isn’t much Quincy Jenkins can’t tackle.The former Baylor University football player graduated in December 2016 with a Master of Business Administration degree he earned online. Two months later, he landed a strategist job with Google and was set to become a first-time father.
“My family was really very supportive,” Jenkins said. “They all thought I was going to go back to school much sooner. Most of my friends, however, thought I was nuts to go back to school and work a full-time job — especially considering my wife was pregnant and due any day.”
Still, Jenkins persevered. He attended school online while working full-time in commercial sales with Sherwin-Williams in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.
Jenkins was originally planning to become a cardiologist. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Baylor in 2009.
“When I finished my undergrad, my initial plan was to go to grad school and kind of figure out where I wanted to go to work from there,” he said. “That was around the time the economy was tanking. I was lucky to take a job with Sherwin-Williams.” With his future goals in mind, Jenkins eventually knew he wanted to build a strong foundation for responsible leadership by equipping himself with all the tools of a business background.
Jenkins played high school football at Trinidad, about 90 miles northeast of Waco. He earned a scholarship to play defensive tackle for the Baylor Bears after walking onto the program as a freshman.
“I’m still the only six-man player to get a scholarship to a Division I university and play all four years,” Jenkins said. “I’m pretty proud of that.”
However, trying to balance the demands of school and football proved to be a difficult assignment.
“Being a biology pre-med major and being on a football scholarship was quite the juggling act,” he said. “Making lab time work 20 minutes after practice ended, getting to the lab for two hours and making film sessions and things of that nature was a very trying, constrained period of my life.”
While Jenkins was finishing the bachelor’s degree program, he had an internship with Baylor Media and served as athletics coordinator for the City of Waco. He landed a job as a store manager for Sherwin-Williams in December 2009.
“When I first started, I thought, ‘Maybe I’ll take a year to work here,” he said. “Then, I’ll go into some sort of science field and see if I catch on with my pre-med pursuits, but the educational path was pretty long and I never really saw myself working in a lab. I’m a people person. I didn’t really know that about myself.”
“Working in a lab environment or a technical environment or something like that, I figured I could make it work. But when you find out you have a hidden talent to do things, you kind of want to explore it more. That’s what Sherwin-Williams brought out of me.”
Six years after graduating from Baylor University, Jenkins returned to find a significantly different experience as an online student.
“It was rough at times because 20-30 hours a week wasn’t easy,” he said. “Having the flexibility to make those 20-30 hours a week available at any free moment you have definitely helped.”
Jenkins said the degree program provided him with valuable insight into different areas of the business world.
Jenkins said he also got a healthy dose of perspective from the curriculum.
“I really took a lot from the Ethical Leadership course,” he said. “Having such a strong sports background, I was of the school of thought that you work through issues and overcome mountains by climbing harder.
“It really helped to temper my leadership style and be a little more empathetic to those who may not work at the same pace as me or come from the same background. I really think it made me a better leader and a better husband. Not everybody is going to respond favorably to those my-way-or-the-highway tactics of leadership.”
Another course Jenkins especially enjoyed was Economics.
“I like the global nature of the course,” he said. “I liked how the course is tailored to help you understand how the world economy and a lot of the current events all play together in the business world. I really enjoyed that aspect of the course, whether it was the articles or some of the case studies, I felt like the relevance with the global economy and dealing with my current job in sales, I felt like it really made a hazy picture clearer on how markets are often manipulated.”
Jenkins said he hadn’t planned on attending his second Baylor graduation ceremony, but he was happy he changed his mind.
“I’m 32 years old, and it just didn’t feel like it was something someone my age would do,” he explained. “I was told by my old football trainer Mike Simms that students don’t walk the stage for themselves — they walk the stage for their parents. I decided I would do that for my loved ones, no matter how uncomfortable I may have thought it would feel. Once I was there, it felt good to be around people. I was probably on the younger side of the online students.”
Jenkins also credits the online MBA program with helping him land his new job at Google.
“Going into this, I really didn’t plan on looking for outside opportunities,” he said. “I really wanted to make myself more marketable internally, but for some reason, through the program, I was motivated to go to a job conference in New Orleans in October.” Jenkins said all of the things the Hankamer School of Business has to offer set Baylor’s MBA apart.
“I would say understanding that all things that are valuable in your life or are worthwhile are generally difficult,” he said. “Take advantage of the resources the program has for you. The professors, whether it was negotiating salary for job opportunities or just general work advice, they’ve all been open throughout the program and since the program.
“Most of all, be brave and don’t be afraid to dive into the program and learn and stretch yourself. At the end of it, the more you put in, most definitely, the more you’ll get out.”

Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

murder CMYK

The News Staff Reports
EAST TEXAS–A Henderson County man who was serving time for the fatal shooting of a Trinidad resident in 2009, was killed in a prison unit in Bowie County last week.
According to news reports, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) is investigating the death of 29-year-old Pete Armando Ayala, of Trinidad, who was serving a 40-year sentence for murder with a deadly weapon for the death of 21-year-old Johnny Lee Brown, also of Trinidad.
TDCJ Public Information Officer Robert Hurst said in a statement to the Bowie County Citizens Tribune, prison officials discovered Ayala unresponsive in his cell on Sunday. They restrained Ayala’s cellmate, Justin Williams, 22, and removed him from the cell. Ayala was transported to a Texarkana hospital, where he was pronounced dead on Wednesday.
The TDCJ is investigating the case as a homicide.
Ayala had been in the Telford Unit since December of 2009, and was not eligible for parole until 2029. His sentence was to run until 2049.
Henderson County Sheriff’s Department reports said dispatch received a 9-1-1 call on Feb. 18, 2009, telling of a gunshot victim at a residence on Leagueline Road. HCSO investigators responded to the scene to assist the Trinidad Police Department with the case. Brown’s body was found in the master bedroom of the residence.
The Henderson County Sheriff’s Department obtained an arrest warrant in connection with the fatal shooting. Ayala was arrested in Garland after he was seen at a McDonald’s restaurant.
Williams joined the unit in November, 2016 to serve a 50-year sentence for murder with a deadly weapon.

Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many people take advantage of nice weather by exercising in the great outdoors. Some might skip the treadmill at the gym in favor of running at the park, while others join recreational sports leagues for some exercise and fun in the sun.
But exercising outdoors carries its share of risk. Unlike gyms where machinery clearly advises members about proper form and warns against lifting excessive weight, Mother Nature comes with no such warning labels. As a result, it’s up to men and women to make injury prevention a priority when taking their exercise routine outside. The following are a handful of preventative measures that can help exercise enthusiasts avoid injury as they attempt to get or stay fit in the great outdoors.
Study the terrain. Part of the danger of exercising outdoors is that, unlike a gym fitted with machines designed for the sole purpose of exercise, nature’s terrain is unpredictable. Safety features you take for granted at the gym, such as padded floors, are nonexistent outdoors. In addition, certain areas in nature might not be suitable to all athletes. For example, mountain biking is a popular sport, but not all mountain biking trails are the same. Some trails are ideal for beginners, while others are best ridden by more seasoned riders. When your outdoor exercise regimen will be taking you off the beaten path, be sure you know the terrain before you start your workout. Speak with fellow outdoor enthusiasts about which trails or courses are best for someone of your skill level and adhere to their recommendations. When exercising on a trail for the first time, bring a friend along so someone can go get help should an accident happen.
Stay hydrated. Dehydration is another cause of injury when athletes exercise in the great outdoors. Gyms have water fountains that allow members to take a drink of water when they’re thirsty. That water can help prevent dehydration, which can be painful and greatly increase your risk of injury. When exercising outdoors, be sure to bring along enough water so you can stay hydrated regardless of how far away from civilization you may find yourself.
Honestly assess your abilities. When exercising outdoors, it’s easy to overdo it. Warm air and sunshine have a way of encouraging athletes to prolong their workout routines or push themselves a little harder. But pushing yourself past your limits can considerably increase your risk of injury. While it’s easy to stay within your limits when exercising indoors, where the environment may encourage you to cut a workout short rather than extend it, it’s easy to overextend yourself outdoors when the weather is nice. So, it’s important for men and women to make an honest assessment of their abilities before beginning an outdoor exercise regimen. Once you know what your body can and can’t handle, you can tailor your outdoor workout to one that makes the most of nice weather without putting your health at risk.
Don’t challenge Mother Nature. One of the biggest risks about exercising outdoors is the tendency some athletes have to ignore the elements. Avoid working out in especially cold or hot weather, as such conditions are not conducive to exercise. Extreme weather also reduces the number of people outside, which means there won’t be as many people around to help you if you suffer an injury, lose your way or need help with your gear. Exercising outdoors is a great way to enjoy nice weather, but limit such workouts to those times of year when temperatures are most conducive to outdoor activity.

Jun

28

Posted by : admin | On : June 28, 2017

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–A Flint woman is in custody after trying to hide a substantial amount of methamphetamine Sunday night, according to Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse.
Rachel Rush, 33, was arrested after 10 p.m. at the intersection of Farm-to-Market 315 and County Road 4201 after deputies discovered a small number of illegal drugs, pills and needles in her vehicle.
After Deputy William Thornton and his partner placed her under arrest, she was seen on the squad car’s video surveillance removing a concealed item from her clothing and placing it in between the rear seat and the backrest.
A small, clear, plastic bag containing approximately 9 grams of suspected methamphetamine was logged in as evidence in the case, along with the other contraband and paraphernalia.
“This is another example of our continuing campaign against illegal drugs in Henderson County,” Hillhouse said.
“Drug users and dealers may think they are safe traveling country back roads, safe traveling in the dark of night. They are wrong.”
Rush faces charges of possession of a controlled substance greater than 4 grams and less than 200 grams, as well as possession of a dangerous drug. She is being held on bail totaling $16,500.

Jun

28

Posted by : admin | On : June 28, 2017

Special to The News
ATHENS–Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse brought in search dogs and a mounted patrol team to apprehend an escaped Hopkins County Inmate Tuesday, as his Deputies arrested two for drug offenses south of Chandler.
Barney Dwayne Ebey, 53, was located in a pasture near Eustace Tuesday afternoon after a Texas Department of Criminal Justice canine unit, with Officers on horse-back, found him in a multi-jurisdictional search lead by Hillhouse.
“This was a team effort,” Hillhouse said. “After we learned an escaped inmate could be in our area, a comprehensive local, state, and federal law-enforcement team worked together to put him back behind bars.”
In addition to the dogs and horses Hillhouse was assisted by, Texas Rangers, the U.S. Marshall Service, Texas Department of Public Safety, East Texas Auto Theft Task Force, the Henderson County Attorney’s Office, Henderson County Sheriff’s Office, Fire Marshall’s Office, Constables Mitch Baker and Brad Miers, and the Hopkins County Sheriff Lewis Tatum and his Deputies were involved in the search and arrest.
Ebey was a trustee in Hopkins County when an accomplice – who was arrested Tuesday in Emory – helped him escape from a work detail.
The investigation lead to a residence off of FM 2709 and Ebey was arrested near HWY 175 just south of the residence in Eustace early yesterday evening after escaping that morning.
Henderson County Justice of the Peace Randy Daniel arraigned Ebey and he was returned to Hopkins County by Hopkins County Sheriff’s Office.
Meanwhile, Zackary Ryan Clemons, 39, and Haley Danielle Middleton, 23, were arrested on Westwood Beach Drive south of Chandler after throwing a substantial amount of methamphetamine out of the vehicle as they were stopped for a traffic violation.
Deputy Meagan Hogan stopped Clemons, who was wanted on a warrant from Smith County and had no driver’s license or insurance.
She and Deputy Cynthia Clements determined that a bag containing the suspected methamphetamine had been thrown out of the vehicle during the traffic stop. A glass pipe belonging to Middleton and commonly used to smoke contraband was also discovered in the vehicle.
Both were arrested and taken to the Henderson County Jail.
“Henderson County is no place for fugitives or drug dealers to hide or do their illegal business,” Hillhouse said.

Jun

28

Posted by : admin | On : June 28, 2017

MalakoffFBCMYK

The News Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff Tiger football team is looking to improve on last year’s season. That means making it to the state championship game, as the Tigers fell just one game short last season, losing to Yoakum 28-24 in the Class 3A Division I Semifinals.
The Tigers come into the 2017 season ranked fifth in the state in Class 3A Division I by Dave Campbell’s Texas Football magazine. The Tigers finished 13-1 last year, with their only loss being in the semifinal game. The Tigers ran the table in the regular season, finishing a perfect 10-0. Malakoff dismantled Troy in the bi-district playoffs 47-14 before doing the same thing to Kirbyville by the score of 49-6. The Tigers then beat a very solid Rockdale team 27-14 to set up a showdown with Cameron Yoe, the team that knocked them out the year before. Malakoff won a thriller in overtime in a driving rain storm 37-34 to make it to the semifinals.
The Tigers are picked to win District 9-3A, followed by Teague. West is picked to finish third, Groesbeck fourth, Whitney fifth, with Elkhart, Eustace and Palestine Westwood at the bottom of the district.
The team the Tigers knocked out in the playoffs, Cameron Yoe, comes in ranked number one in the poll, followed by Halletsville. Brock is ranked third and Yoakum comes in at number four. The rest of the top ten has Wall at number six, district foe Teague at seven, Farmersville at number eight, with Pottsboro and Rockdale rounding out the top ten.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

Andrew Page

Special to The News
ATHENS–A 36-year-old suspected drug dealer riding his bicycle on the wrong side of the road was arrested this weekend in a subdivision just south of Chandler.
Andrew Allen Page was stopped by Deputy Jacob Sumrall Saturday for traveling southbound on Sunrise Dive in the Sunrise Shores subdivision. He was found to be in possession of a substantial amount of suspected methamphetamine and several clear plastic bags commonly used is the distribution of the illegal drug.
“Our deputies are constantly on the look out for anything out of the ordinary,” Sheriff Botie Hillhouse said. “This suspect was going the wrong way, acting nervous and had trouble communicating with the deputy.”
Page was carrying more than 5 grams of the contraband.
“This is part of our concerted campaign against drugs in Henderson County,” Hillhouse said. “Hopefully, this arrest takes us to an even bigger supplier in the criminal drug chain that we are systematically breaking here.”
Page was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. He is currently being held on a $30,000 bail.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many people find it impossible to think about summer without conjuring visions of spending endless hours outdoors from morning until evening, whether beachside, on the open water or even floating in a backyard pool.
Although a certain measure of sun exposure is required for some natural functions of the body, it’s well documented that too much time in the sun can be hazardous to one’s health. That’s why summer frolickers need to exercise considerable caution each time they step outside.
Taking sunburn for granted can be a big mistake. Many people wouldn’t risk burns from a hot stove or open fire, but they won’t think twice about being unprotected under the very hot rays of the sun.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than one-third of adults and nearly 70 percent of children admit to suffering from sunburn within the past year. Depending on the intensity of the sun and the amount of time spent outside, sunburn can be a first or second-degree burn. In first-degree burns, damage affects the topmost layer of skin. However, sunburn can even affect deeper layers and cause blistering in addition to redness and pain.
Sunburn also can cause some irreparable damage that goes unseen. According to WebMD, ultraviolet light from the sun can alter DNA, prematurely aging skin or even contributing to skin cancers.
It can take years before symptoms become noticeable. Therefore, it is best for people of all ages to exercise caution when spending time in the sun.
Sunburn is one of the most easily prevented summertime ailments. It’s also important to note that sunburns are not just limited to the hot weather or when it is sunny outside. Ultraviolet damage can occur at any time of the year, and also from artificial UV sources, such as tanning beds. Preventing sunburn is simple.
The Mayo Clinic says the sun’s rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so schedule outdoor activities for other times of day. Otherwise, limit exposure to the sun and take frequent breaks in the shade.
Wear protective clothing that covers the arms and legs. Some outdoor gear is designed to offer sun protection. Tightly woven fabrics tend to help the most.
Apply and reapply sunscreen. Look for products that offer an SPF of 15 or greater. The American Academy of Dermatology actually recommends an SPF of 30 or greater.
Make sure the product is broad-spectrum, meaning it protects against UVA and UVB rays.
Apply sunscreen thoroughly, paying attention to the tops of feet, hands and other places that tend to go untreated. Reapply every two hours or more frequently, if necessary.
Base tans do not protect the skin. Research does not support the habit of getting a tan to prevent subsequent sunburn.
Protect the face and eyes by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and highly rated UV protection sunglasses.
The Skin Cancer Foundation says a person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns.
Use protection, stay hydrated and play it smart to enjoy summer to the fullest.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–The Athens Hornets and Lady Hornets had nine total athletes named to the Class 4A Academic All-State team.
Lady Hornet softball players Jennifer Bradford, Alicia Grogan, Kelli Gartman and Sam Smith were selected to the Academic All-State softball team by the Texas High School Girls Coaches Association. Athens Hornet graduate Meagan Withers was named to the Academic All-State tennis team by the same association.
To be nominated to the team, athletes must be graduating seniors, have an overall grade point average of 94 or above for grades 9-11, must be a varsity participant or support staff member in good standing and be of good moral character.
The Athens Hornet baseball team had four players named to the Academic All-State baseball team by the Texas High School Coaches Association, with senior Cameron Woodard being selected to the Elite team.
Kolemann Dooley and Casey Pitchford were named to the first team as well, with Jacob Ickes being named to the second team.
To be nominated for academic All-State, a student must be an athlete, student trainer or manager in good standing with the team, of good moral character, a senior and have an overall grade point average of 92 or above.
To make the Elite team, a player must have near perfect scores in all categories.