Jul

20

Posted by : admin | On : July 20, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Summer is a season of relaxation, especially for school-aged children who are not yet old enough to work. Such youngsters no doubt enjoy the chance to spend summer days lounging poolside or at the beach, all without a care in the world or any homework to complete.
Though summer is synonymous with R&R, parents of young athletes who hope to compete in scholastic athletics when the school year begins in autumn may need to take steps to ensure their children are not at risk of injury once the curtain comes up on fall sports season.
Examine and replace equipment if necessary. The right equipment can protect children from injury and help them realize their full athletic potential. But damaged or outdated equipment can increase children’s risk of injury. Examine your child’s equipment long before fall sports season begins so you have time to bargain hunt should anything need to be replaced.
Schedule a physical for your child. Many school districts mandate that athletes receive and pass physicals before they can compete. Speak with the athletic director at your childs school to learn the guidelines that govern athletic physicals. The physical will need to be conducted by a predetermined date, but you may also need the physical to be conducted after a certain date for it to be considered valid. Speak with your childs physician if any problems are found during the physical.
Let children heal. Children’s schedules are busier than ever before, and many youngsters play several sports during the school year. Summer vacation may be the only extended period all year that youngsters bodies get to heal. While it is important that children stay physically active throughout the summer, make sure they don’t overdo it, as you should emphasize the importance of rest.
Gradually get back in the swing of things. While rest gives children’s bodies a chance to heal and develop, it is important that young athletes stay in shape over the summer. As the fall sports season draws near, help children gradually get back in the swing of things. Tryouts tend to be physically demanding, so children who have not lifted a finger all summer may be at risk of injury or missing the cut. Let children ease back into regular exercise to make sure they are not starting from scratch come their first tryout.
Speak with coaches. Coaches can be great assets to parents who want to make sure their youngsters enjoy the summer without sacrificing their chances of making the team in the fall. Speak with your child’s coaches to determine if there is any area your son or daughter can work on over the summer to improve his or her chances of making the team. Make sure kids are the ones leading the charge to improve their games; otherwise, they may feel pressured into doing so and that can take away the fun of playing sports.
Scholastic athletes should take advantage of the opportunity to relax and recover that summer presents. But athletes who hope to compete in the fall can still work with their parents to ensure they’re ready once the school year and sports season begins.

Jul

20

Posted by : admin | On : July 20, 2017

AthensCCCMYK
The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–Reporting day is fast approaching for many athletes as practices begin in less than a month.
Many summer training programs have been occurring over the last three months, with the first official day of volleyball practices slated for Aug. 1.
Contact practices begin across Texas on Aug. 11 for all schools in Henderson County.
Meanwhile, the first Athens volleyball scrimmage is set for Aug. 4 on the road against the Corsicana Lady Tigers at 9 a.m.
Following that scrimmage, there will be a five-team scrimmage Aug. 5 at Athens.
That scrimmage starts at 9 a.m. and will consist of Athens, Elkhart, Canton, Westwood and Cayuga.
The first official game of the year for the Lady Hornets will be a dual match at E.L. Kirk Gymnasium in Eustace at 4:30 p.m. against both Eustace and Mildred.
The Lady Hornets then head out to the Eustace tournament on the weekend of Aug. 10-12.
With district realignment happening in February, this will be Athens’ final year in the volleyball district with Fairfield, Mexia, Madisonville and Palestine.
Athens look to improve to a playoff team following a bi-district loss to Lorena last year.
The first home match for Athens will be Aug. 11 against Scurry-Rosser.
The Athens Hornets begin football practices Monday, Aug. 7 at 4 p.m. with freshman, junior varsity and varsity workouts.
Athens will be hosting an incoming freshmen football camp at Bruce Field July 31 through Aug. 2.
The first official scrimmage will be in Greenville Aug. 18 at 7 p.m. The Hornets then wrap up their scrimmage schedule on Aug. 25 at home against the Green Lions.
The Hornets season kicks off the regular season Sept. 1 at the newly-renovated Bruce Field at 7:30 p.m.
Before the upcoming district realignment, this is the final year that the Hornets will compete against Brownsboro, Mabank, Van, Kaufman, Crandall and Terrell.

Jul

13

Posted by : admin | On : July 13, 2017

JohnsonCMYK

Special to The News
SHAWNEE, Okla.Tyler Johnson of Athens is competing in the 25th annual International Finals Youth Rodeo held July 9-14 at the Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center in Shawnee, Okla.
Johnson is participating in the world’s richest youth rodeo, hoping to win his share of more than $250,000 in prize money and championship saddles and buckles.
Johnson will join more than 800 of the top high school rodeo athletes from around the world for the 2017 IFYR. He is vying for prizes in bareback riding.
Contestants will compete in 10 events running simultaneously in three arenas throughout the week. Events include barrel racing, pole bending, breakaway roping, goat tying, team roping, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, bull riding, saddle bronc riding and bareback riding.
The IFYR consists of two long go-rounds and a short go. All contestants compete once in each of the long go-rounds. The top 15 averages in each event will compete Friday night in the championship round short go for fame and prizes.
“The International Finals Youth Rodeo was developed to provide high school athletes with a professional level rodeo,” said Chris Dunlap, assistant director of the Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center and International Finals Youth Rodeo. “Twenty-five years later, the IFYR is where any hopeful rodeo champion wants to be and be seen.”
The IFYR is not only home to the top high school athletes in the nation, but it is also an opportunity that allows for contestants and their families to travel, rodeo along the way and meet peers from across the country.
The International Finals Youth Rodeo, held annually since 1993, is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that presents top high school athletes with a professional rodeo. The internationally-recognized IFYR is held annually at the Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center in Shawnee, Okla.
The action-packed event includes hundreds of contestants vying to win more than $250,000 in prize money, competing in 10 events running simultaneously in three arenas over six days.
In 2016, more than 920 contestants and their families traveled from 34 states and Australia to participate in the IFYR. For more information, visit IFYR.com or call 405-275-7020.

Jul

13

Posted by : admin | On : July 13, 2017

MalakoffFB6CMYK

The News Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff Tigers football team comes into the 2017 season as favorites to win District 9-3A, Division I.
The Tigers are ranked No. 5 in the state in the Class 3A, Division I Coaches and Top 20 poll.
Malakoff’s offense will be led by senior quarterback Judd Miller. Miller passed for 3,527 yards and 48 touchdowns in his junior season. Miller is also picked as the preseason Offensive MVP of the District.
Aiding Miller on the offensive side of the ball will be returning running back Breashawn Williams. Williams rushed for 1,233 yards and 14 touchdowns last season under coach Jamie Driskell. Offensive lineman Kobe Wilbanks will be providing the blocking protection for both Miller and Williams.
Helping out on defense will be linebacker Zee Bailey, who finished last season with an impressive 148 tackles and three forced fumbles.
Meanwhile in District 8-4A, Division I, the Athens Hornets are predicted to finish fifth.
The Hornets look to improve upon last year’s disappointing 2-8 finish. The Hornets had made the playoffs the previous four seasons under coach Paul Essary.
Leading the offense for the Hornets will be senior quarterback Xavius Fulton and tight end Rowdy Godwin. The main running backs returning will be JaQuaylon Bowman and Jerquindon Taylor.
In District 10-2A, Division I, the Cross Roads Bobcats are predicted to finish sixth.
The Bobcats will look to improve under new head coach Daniel Pierce, but will have to find a new quarterback after the graduation of Taylor McKenzie.
Senior linebacker Brandon Wilson will be returning for the Bobcats. Players to watch for the Bobcats based on the Dave Campbell’s Texas Football Magazine writers’ predictions are wide receiver Luc Hyles as well as linemen Karson Fletcher, Hunter Lawrence and Kaden Mattingly.
In District 15-A, Division II, the Trinidad Trojans are predicted to finish fourth, while only two teams make playoffs in Class A play.
Former Mount Calm coach Chad Satcher replaces James Massarrelli as the Trojans new head coach after Massarrelli left this offseason.
The Trojans will be led offensively by quarterback Colby Snider and running back Romal Womack.
Players to watch for the Trojans defensively this season are linebackers Johnny Ayala, Talon Sims, Billy Quinn, defensive backs Kaeleb Eastman, Antywon Shofner and Kaleb Mines. Also included are linemen Cameron Brookins, Tristan Fletcher, Eli Arnold and Zach Stanfield.

Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

Special to The News
WACO–There isn’t much Quincy Jenkins can’t tackle.The former Baylor University football player graduated in December 2016 with a Master of Business Administration degree he earned online. Two months later, he landed a strategist job with Google and was set to become a first-time father.
“My family was really very supportive,” Jenkins said. “They all thought I was going to go back to school much sooner. Most of my friends, however, thought I was nuts to go back to school and work a full-time job — especially considering my wife was pregnant and due any day.”
Still, Jenkins persevered. He attended school online while working full-time in commercial sales with Sherwin-Williams in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.
Jenkins was originally planning to become a cardiologist. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Baylor in 2009.
“When I finished my undergrad, my initial plan was to go to grad school and kind of figure out where I wanted to go to work from there,” he said. “That was around the time the economy was tanking. I was lucky to take a job with Sherwin-Williams.” With his future goals in mind, Jenkins eventually knew he wanted to build a strong foundation for responsible leadership by equipping himself with all the tools of a business background.
Jenkins played high school football at Trinidad, about 90 miles northeast of Waco. He earned a scholarship to play defensive tackle for the Baylor Bears after walking onto the program as a freshman.
“I’m still the only six-man player to get a scholarship to a Division I university and play all four years,” Jenkins said. “I’m pretty proud of that.”
However, trying to balance the demands of school and football proved to be a difficult assignment.
“Being a biology pre-med major and being on a football scholarship was quite the juggling act,” he said. “Making lab time work 20 minutes after practice ended, getting to the lab for two hours and making film sessions and things of that nature was a very trying, constrained period of my life.”
While Jenkins was finishing the bachelor’s degree program, he had an internship with Baylor Media and served as athletics coordinator for the City of Waco. He landed a job as a store manager for Sherwin-Williams in December 2009.
“When I first started, I thought, ‘Maybe I’ll take a year to work here,” he said. “Then, I’ll go into some sort of science field and see if I catch on with my pre-med pursuits, but the educational path was pretty long and I never really saw myself working in a lab. I’m a people person. I didn’t really know that about myself.”
“Working in a lab environment or a technical environment or something like that, I figured I could make it work. But when you find out you have a hidden talent to do things, you kind of want to explore it more. That’s what Sherwin-Williams brought out of me.”
Six years after graduating from Baylor University, Jenkins returned to find a significantly different experience as an online student.
“It was rough at times because 20-30 hours a week wasn’t easy,” he said. “Having the flexibility to make those 20-30 hours a week available at any free moment you have definitely helped.”
Jenkins said the degree program provided him with valuable insight into different areas of the business world.
Jenkins said he also got a healthy dose of perspective from the curriculum.
“I really took a lot from the Ethical Leadership course,” he said. “Having such a strong sports background, I was of the school of thought that you work through issues and overcome mountains by climbing harder.
“It really helped to temper my leadership style and be a little more empathetic to those who may not work at the same pace as me or come from the same background. I really think it made me a better leader and a better husband. Not everybody is going to respond favorably to those my-way-or-the-highway tactics of leadership.”
Another course Jenkins especially enjoyed was Economics.
“I like the global nature of the course,” he said. “I liked how the course is tailored to help you understand how the world economy and a lot of the current events all play together in the business world. I really enjoyed that aspect of the course, whether it was the articles or some of the case studies, I felt like the relevance with the global economy and dealing with my current job in sales, I felt like it really made a hazy picture clearer on how markets are often manipulated.”
Jenkins said he hadn’t planned on attending his second Baylor graduation ceremony, but he was happy he changed his mind.
“I’m 32 years old, and it just didn’t feel like it was something someone my age would do,” he explained. “I was told by my old football trainer Mike Simms that students don’t walk the stage for themselves — they walk the stage for their parents. I decided I would do that for my loved ones, no matter how uncomfortable I may have thought it would feel. Once I was there, it felt good to be around people. I was probably on the younger side of the online students.”
Jenkins also credits the online MBA program with helping him land his new job at Google.
“Going into this, I really didn’t plan on looking for outside opportunities,” he said. “I really wanted to make myself more marketable internally, but for some reason, through the program, I was motivated to go to a job conference in New Orleans in October.” Jenkins said all of the things the Hankamer School of Business has to offer set Baylor’s MBA apart.
“I would say understanding that all things that are valuable in your life or are worthwhile are generally difficult,” he said. “Take advantage of the resources the program has for you. The professors, whether it was negotiating salary for job opportunities or just general work advice, they’ve all been open throughout the program and since the program.
“Most of all, be brave and don’t be afraid to dive into the program and learn and stretch yourself. At the end of it, the more you put in, most definitely, the more you’ll get out.”

Jul

06

Posted by : admin | On : July 6, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many people take advantage of nice weather by exercising in the great outdoors. Some might skip the treadmill at the gym in favor of running at the park, while others join recreational sports leagues for some exercise and fun in the sun.
But exercising outdoors carries its share of risk. Unlike gyms where machinery clearly advises members about proper form and warns against lifting excessive weight, Mother Nature comes with no such warning labels. As a result, it’s up to men and women to make injury prevention a priority when taking their exercise routine outside. The following are a handful of preventative measures that can help exercise enthusiasts avoid injury as they attempt to get or stay fit in the great outdoors.
Study the terrain. Part of the danger of exercising outdoors is that, unlike a gym fitted with machines designed for the sole purpose of exercise, nature’s terrain is unpredictable. Safety features you take for granted at the gym, such as padded floors, are nonexistent outdoors. In addition, certain areas in nature might not be suitable to all athletes. For example, mountain biking is a popular sport, but not all mountain biking trails are the same. Some trails are ideal for beginners, while others are best ridden by more seasoned riders. When your outdoor exercise regimen will be taking you off the beaten path, be sure you know the terrain before you start your workout. Speak with fellow outdoor enthusiasts about which trails or courses are best for someone of your skill level and adhere to their recommendations. When exercising on a trail for the first time, bring a friend along so someone can go get help should an accident happen.
Stay hydrated. Dehydration is another cause of injury when athletes exercise in the great outdoors. Gyms have water fountains that allow members to take a drink of water when they’re thirsty. That water can help prevent dehydration, which can be painful and greatly increase your risk of injury. When exercising outdoors, be sure to bring along enough water so you can stay hydrated regardless of how far away from civilization you may find yourself.
Honestly assess your abilities. When exercising outdoors, it’s easy to overdo it. Warm air and sunshine have a way of encouraging athletes to prolong their workout routines or push themselves a little harder. But pushing yourself past your limits can considerably increase your risk of injury. While it’s easy to stay within your limits when exercising indoors, where the environment may encourage you to cut a workout short rather than extend it, it’s easy to overextend yourself outdoors when the weather is nice. So, it’s important for men and women to make an honest assessment of their abilities before beginning an outdoor exercise regimen. Once you know what your body can and can’t handle, you can tailor your outdoor workout to one that makes the most of nice weather without putting your health at risk.
Don’t challenge Mother Nature. One of the biggest risks about exercising outdoors is the tendency some athletes have to ignore the elements. Avoid working out in especially cold or hot weather, as such conditions are not conducive to exercise. Extreme weather also reduces the number of people outside, which means there won’t be as many people around to help you if you suffer an injury, lose your way or need help with your gear. Exercising outdoors is a great way to enjoy nice weather, but limit such workouts to those times of year when temperatures are most conducive to outdoor activity.

Jun

28

Posted by : admin | On : June 28, 2017

MalakoffFBCMYK

The News Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff Tiger football team is looking to improve on last year’s season. That means making it to the state championship game, as the Tigers fell just one game short last season, losing to Yoakum 28-24 in the Class 3A Division I Semifinals.
The Tigers come into the 2017 season ranked fifth in the state in Class 3A Division I by Dave Campbell’s Texas Football magazine. The Tigers finished 13-1 last year, with their only loss being in the semifinal game. The Tigers ran the table in the regular season, finishing a perfect 10-0. Malakoff dismantled Troy in the bi-district playoffs 47-14 before doing the same thing to Kirbyville by the score of 49-6. The Tigers then beat a very solid Rockdale team 27-14 to set up a showdown with Cameron Yoe, the team that knocked them out the year before. Malakoff won a thriller in overtime in a driving rain storm 37-34 to make it to the semifinals.
The Tigers are picked to win District 9-3A, followed by Teague. West is picked to finish third, Groesbeck fourth, Whitney fifth, with Elkhart, Eustace and Palestine Westwood at the bottom of the district.
The team the Tigers knocked out in the playoffs, Cameron Yoe, comes in ranked number one in the poll, followed by Halletsville. Brock is ranked third and Yoakum comes in at number four. The rest of the top ten has Wall at number six, district foe Teague at seven, Farmersville at number eight, with Pottsboro and Rockdale rounding out the top ten.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

CEDAR CREEK LAKE–Many people find it impossible to think about summer without conjuring visions of spending endless hours outdoors from morning until evening, whether beachside, on the open water or even floating in a backyard pool.
Although a certain measure of sun exposure is required for some natural functions of the body, it’s well documented that too much time in the sun can be hazardous to one’s health. That’s why summer frolickers need to exercise considerable caution each time they step outside.
Taking sunburn for granted can be a big mistake. Many people wouldn’t risk burns from a hot stove or open fire, but they won’t think twice about being unprotected under the very hot rays of the sun.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than one-third of adults and nearly 70 percent of children admit to suffering from sunburn within the past year. Depending on the intensity of the sun and the amount of time spent outside, sunburn can be a first or second-degree burn. In first-degree burns, damage affects the topmost layer of skin. However, sunburn can even affect deeper layers and cause blistering in addition to redness and pain.
Sunburn also can cause some irreparable damage that goes unseen. According to WebMD, ultraviolet light from the sun can alter DNA, prematurely aging skin or even contributing to skin cancers.
It can take years before symptoms become noticeable. Therefore, it is best for people of all ages to exercise caution when spending time in the sun.
Sunburn is one of the most easily prevented summertime ailments. It’s also important to note that sunburns are not just limited to the hot weather or when it is sunny outside. Ultraviolet damage can occur at any time of the year, and also from artificial UV sources, such as tanning beds. Preventing sunburn is simple.
The Mayo Clinic says the sun’s rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so schedule outdoor activities for other times of day. Otherwise, limit exposure to the sun and take frequent breaks in the shade.
Wear protective clothing that covers the arms and legs. Some outdoor gear is designed to offer sun protection. Tightly woven fabrics tend to help the most.
Apply and reapply sunscreen. Look for products that offer an SPF of 15 or greater. The American Academy of Dermatology actually recommends an SPF of 30 or greater.
Make sure the product is broad-spectrum, meaning it protects against UVA and UVB rays.
Apply sunscreen thoroughly, paying attention to the tops of feet, hands and other places that tend to go untreated. Reapply every two hours or more frequently, if necessary.
Base tans do not protect the skin. Research does not support the habit of getting a tan to prevent subsequent sunburn.
Protect the face and eyes by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and highly rated UV protection sunglasses.
The Skin Cancer Foundation says a person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns.
Use protection, stay hydrated and play it smart to enjoy summer to the fullest.

Jun

22

Posted by : admin | On : June 22, 2017

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–The Athens Hornets and Lady Hornets had nine total athletes named to the Class 4A Academic All-State team.
Lady Hornet softball players Jennifer Bradford, Alicia Grogan, Kelli Gartman and Sam Smith were selected to the Academic All-State softball team by the Texas High School Girls Coaches Association. Athens Hornet graduate Meagan Withers was named to the Academic All-State tennis team by the same association.
To be nominated to the team, athletes must be graduating seniors, have an overall grade point average of 94 or above for grades 9-11, must be a varsity participant or support staff member in good standing and be of good moral character.
The Athens Hornet baseball team had four players named to the Academic All-State baseball team by the Texas High School Coaches Association, with senior Cameron Woodard being selected to the Elite team.
Kolemann Dooley and Casey Pitchford were named to the first team as well, with Jacob Ickes being named to the second team.
To be nominated for academic All-State, a student must be an athlete, student trainer or manager in good standing with the team, of good moral character, a senior and have an overall grade point average of 92 or above.
To make the Elite team, a player must have near perfect scores in all categories.

Jun

15

Posted by : admin | On : June 15, 2017

AthensFB1CMYK

The News Staff Reports
LONGVIEW–Athens Hornet graduate Maalik Hall helped his Blue team to a 17-7 victory over the Red team at the Chic-fil-A FCA Heart of a Champion All-Star game Saturday, June 10 at Longview’s Lobo Stadium. The game was part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ All-Star Weekend, which also included All-Star baseball and softball games.
Hall, a running back and linebacker in his career at Athens, started at outside linebacker for the Blue team and finished the game with five tackles, as well as playing on the punt team and the kickoff return team. Hall was nominated for the honor by Athens High School Athletic Director/Head Football Coach Paul Essary.
Hall will be continuing his education and football career in the fall as he will be playing for Southeastern Oklahoma State University.
Mabank’s Noel Rojo and Eustace’s Mikey Marshall were also selected as members of the Blue team. Marshall started on the offensive line while Rojo came off the bench to play on the offensive line as well.
Rojo will take his talents to the next level and will play for Bethany College in the fall. Marshall is headed to Missouri Valley.
The vision of the FCA is to see the world impacted for Jesus Christ through the influence of coaches and athletes.