Mar

23

Posted by : admin | On : March 23, 2017

May use this one

May use this one


By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
TOOL–Tool Elementary School Principal Christa Calhoun and Malakoff Elementary Principal Ronny Snow received Region 7 awards in recognition of High Progress as Title 1 schools.
Federal Programs Specialist Vicki Weatherford presented the awards. Snow was also recognized as High Performing which means the school scored in the top 25 percent in performance.
Snow was also presented with an award from the Governor of the State of Texas in recognition of his being named District Educator of the Year by his alma mater Sam Houston State University. Snow received that honor at the university during an award ceremony March 4.
Superintendent Perry commented what an honor it was to receive such a distinction from one’s alma mater. “We are very proud of Mr. Snow,” he said.
The board saw a demonstration from Pasha French’s fourth grade class who recently learned about electrical circuits. Killian Ireland, Anna Svoboda and Alek Green presented a hands-on demonstration of what they have learned.
Superintendent Perry read for the first time, Update 107, an update to district policy. He gave the board what he called the “cliff notes” version and the board members were provided with the entire update.
Notable changes were in the gifts section which allows the superintendent to accept gifts on behalf of the district unless they are real property or have a condition attached to them, fund-raising which reinforces the requirement for parent-teacher groups and organizations to have principal approval in advance for all fund raising efforts. Perry pointed out that this has been an issue in the past with the school not being aware of a fund-raiser in progress.
The other portion Perry expounded on regarded compulsory attendance. In the State of Texas under §25.085[2], compulsory attendance applies to students who are at least six years old as of September 1 of the applicable school year. The law requires a student to attend public school until the student’s 19th birthday, unless the student is exempt under §25.086.
Exemptions currently include children who are enrolled in a private or parochial school, children who are eligible to participate in a special education program and cannot be served by the district, children who have a physical or mental condition of a temporary or remedial nature and are recuperating or children who are expelled. (There are others. For full information refer to §25.086, available online.)
For students who are homeschooled, the district requires a dated letter on file from the parent or guardian stating such. Perry added that if the district has evidence that a child is not being educated, the district can then investigate and pursue legal action to compel attendance. There must be a good reason, Perry added. The board will have time to review this update and vote on it during the next board meeting.
In other business, the board:
• approved the district calendar for the 2017-2018 school year with school starting Aug. 28 and ending May 25. May 29 is listed as a possible bad weather make-up day.
• noted current enrollment is 1,302, attendance at 94 percent down from 96 percent last year. Perry noted they would have to do well this last 10 weeks in order to get back up to 96 percent. Pervasive illness during the third six weeks (including closing one day), caused the drop in attendance numbers,
• approved five struck-off properties to be sold in the Henderson County Sheriff’s sale May 2,
• made plans for board members to attend summer leadership institute,
• approved Superintendent Perry to serve on the Region 7 ESC Regional Advisory Committee 2017-18.

Mar

23

Posted by : admin | On : March 23, 2017

DawsonCMYK

The News Staff Reports
MALAKOFF–Malakoff Lady Tiger junior small forward/power forward Jalie Dawson has been selected to the Texas Girls Coaches Association All-State Basketball Team.
Athletes are nominated by member coaches and selected by the Texas Girls Coaches Association Basketball All-State Committee at their annual meeting during the UIL girls state basketball tournament.
Dawson has alreadybeen selected as the District 18-3A Offensive Most Valuable Player and Texas Association of Basketball Coaches All-Region team member for her play this season.
The five-foot, seven-inch Dawson averaged 21.3 points, 7.2 rebounds, 3.7 steals and 1.5 assists per game for the Lady Tigers, who won the bi-district championship with a 48-46 victory over Maypearl before losing to Little River-Academy in the area round of the state playoffs, 70-50.
Malakoff Head Basketball Coach Meghan Hyde was proud of the accomplishment of her junior player. “It’s an awesome honor, especially as a junior to be selected for the All-State team. Jalie has been huge in our program since her freshman year, she has tons pressure on her year after year, but still rises to the occasion.” said Hyde.
Hyde said she is excited to see what the future holds. “She is such a competitor and has a great work ethic. I can’t wait to see what she will do her senior year.”

Mar

16

Posted by : admin | On : March 16, 2017

Floyd Thomas

Floyd Thomas


By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff City Council is going ahead with the purchase of a Storm Warning Siren to be installed on the north side of the city at the water treatment plant. The council agreed Tuesday, March 13 to seek monetary support from the Economic Development Corporation. The siren system, including installation and computer software, totals $51,000.
The city conducted a test of the system at 2 p.m. to insure the siren can be heard by anyone outside within a two-mile radius. This was one of four actions taken after a lengthy executive session.
The council also named Interim Police Chief Floyd Thomas the official police chief. He received congratulations all around.
Council members agreed to the reformation of the Malakoff Fire Department. More applications from volunteers willing to serve are still being accepted for another two weeks, at which time the council expects to hold a special meeting to interview from the list of volunteers, suitable candidates for fire chief and fire marshal, Mayor Pro Tem Tim Trimble said. Mayor Delois Pagitt was absent. Thus far, the city has received five applications, Trimble said. Applications are available at city hall and should be returned there once they are filled out.
The very full agenda also contained the approval of $7,300 in EDC funds to help pay for $10,000 worth of improvements at the ball fields.
Softball and Baseball Association representative Jason Hayes reviewed the three projects for the funding, including: clearing up a sewer issue, making repairs to lights and putting a concrete pad under the spectators’ bleachers.
Hayes said the organization was also seeking grant funding to assist with the installation of lights for field 4, replace or repair scoreboards and replace the backstop on Kilman Field.
In addition, the council renewed a five-year lease agreement with the association for the use of the ball fields through 2022 at a dollar per year, payable on each March 1.
“We welcome those big tournaments that bring in retail sales to Malakoff,” Trimble said. “So, we’re glad to help out.”
The council also agreed to change three items in a proposed service agreement with Star Harbor for wastewater treatment, at the request of Star Harbor.
The amended agreement must now return to Star Harbor’s city attorney and then to their council for a vote and signing before it takes effect. Earlier that day, the Star Harbor City Council also met and two people from that community attended the Malakoff City Council meeting held that evening.
Funds the Star Harbor community held in escrow for January and February’s billing, rather than pay toward the proffered service agreement, motivated Malakoff to negotiate, with Star Harbor Mayor, Walter Bingham, told The News by phone interview.

Mar

16

Posted by : admin | On : March 16, 2017

Decomposing deer

By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Texas Game Wardens worked a gruesome site recently in Log Cabin. About two dozen carcasses of white-tailed deer and remains of alligators have been cleared from property in the vicinity of a tannery and taxidermist in the Cedar Creek Lake area.
On March 10, The Texas Wardens Facebook Page posted several photos and a brief report of the spoilage of white-tailed deer lying on the ground, rotting, some covered in flies, others dried up as if been there for a long period of time; horns, capes and alligator skulls.
Game Wardens filed 24 cases of Waste of Game, a Class C misdemeanor, with Justice of the Peace Tommy Barnett. Due to the case being under active investigation, the JP5 Office declined to release the name of the taxidermist.
The post reports game wardens had received several calls. One of those calls came from recently installed Log Cabin Police Chief Todd Tucker.
“We discovered it while conducting an unrelated investigation of our own,” he said. Tucker said he made the call a couple of weeks ago.
The post states that game wardens arriving on the scene initially found 19 deer lying in the violator’s yard. It adds that the walk-in cooler had been removed from the property and sold.
The taxidermist told The News that only two deer were actually on his property and that there is much more to the story than the post on the Game Warden’s Facebook page. He plans to press charges for defamation, he said, adding he had filed a report of vandalism of his property.
Though there are more than 300 comments to the Facebook post, none of them named the taxidermist involved.
Game wardens report a total of 24 deer in a condition no longer safe for human consumption.
It reports numerous record book violations and states DNA analysis will be a part of their findings.
Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse said he had been asked to investigate a possible burglary at the property, however the few leads he had didn’t pan out.
Waste of Game is an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if a person while hunting kills or wounds a game bird or game animal and intentionally or knowingly fails to make a reasonable effort to retrieve the animal or bird and include it in the person’s daily or seasonal bag limit. It is an offense if a person intentionally takes or possesses a game bird, game animal, or fish and intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly, or with criminal negligence, fails to keep the edible portions of the bird, animal, or fish in an edible condition.

Mar

09

Posted by : admin | On : March 9, 2017

By Erik Walsh
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF–The Malakoff Lady Tigers basketball team got its share of post season district awards, including Jalie Dawson’s recognition as Co-Offensive MVP.
Dawson claimed the most prestigious award of all the Lady Tigers, but other gained notable recognition. Juniors Charlsey Stearman and Taliaha Dora gained a place on the All-District First Team, showing promise for next year when they are seniors.
Sophomore KeiKei Walker and senior Kerrian Toliver were named to the All-District Second Team.
Kamry Hurd, Kerrian Toliver and Charlsey Stearman were named to the All-Academic Team.
The Lady Tigers had a succesfull season, defeating Maypearl 48-46 in the Bi-District round of the State Playoffs before losing to Little River Academy 70-50 in the Area Round.
The complete District 18-3A award list is as follows:
District MVP: Jordan Jenkins, Buffalo
Offensive MVP: Kadaja Nickleberry, Teague and Jalie Dawson, Malakoff
Defensive MVP: Ashley Nickleberry and Samantha Pate, Buffalo
Newcomer of the Year: Mollie Dittmar, Buffalo
Sixth Man Award: Cady Drake, Teague
Coach of the Year: Chris Nickleberry, Teague and Jozette Jenkins, Buffalo
First Team All-District
Lauren Pate, Buffalo, Destanee Roblow, Teague, Zytaria Herod, Teague, Kennedy Bennett, Teague, Charlsey Stearman, Malakoff, Taliaha Dora, Malakoff, Kaydee Honeycutt, Leon, Sarah Grace Merry, Leon, Baylee Williams, Frankston, Trinity Boggs, Frankston, Jordon Carter, Westwood, Monica Wilson, Westwood.
Second Team All-District
Jabria Simmons, Elkhart, Naomi Williams, Elkhart, Allie Hayes, Elkhart, A’sia Bradley,Buffalo, Hannah Eakin, Buffalo, Madison Steen, Teague, Mallorie Sims, Teague, KeiKei Walker, MalaKoff, Kerrian Toliver, Malakoff, Jayla Hawkins, Frankston, Bradlie Crowley, Leon, Cameron Davidson, Leon, Janzel Baroy, Westwood, Chelsey Walker, Westwood.

Mar

02

Posted by : admin | On : March 2, 2017

: THE NEWS PHOTO/RUSSELL SLATON – Teri Caswell (right), executive director of Faith in Action Outreach (FIAO), tells fellow Malakoff Rotarian Julie Armstrong (left) about the FIAO Day Resource Center located in Athens, during the club’s Feb. 21 meeting.

: THE NEWS PHOTO/RUSSELL SLATON – Teri Caswell (right), executive director of Faith in Action Outreach (FIAO), tells fellow Malakoff Rotarian Julie Armstrong (left) about the FIAO Day Resource Center located in Athens, during the club’s Feb. 21 meeting.


By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
ATHENS–Malakoff Rotary members met Feb. 21 in Athens to hear Faith in Action Outreach’s executive director, fellow Rotarian Teri Caswell, give a report about the group’s Day Resource Center, which has been helping the homeless in Athens since it opened on Dec. 5, 2016.
Serving the homeless population – along with those who are on the brink of homelessness – needs extra help from the community, Caswell told Rotarians. “Since we opened our doors, the number of people we are serving continues to grow each day, so the cost of staying open is growing, too,” Caswell said.
“We need funds to keep our doors open so we can continue to serve the poor and needy in our area,” Caswell continued. “We know that God has called us to open this mission, and we know that He will provide the funds through His people – YOU! Please help us to help others.”
The fundraising drive is hosted on a GoFundMe web page, where online donations can be made. FIAO would like to reach its fundraising goal by March 15, Caswell said.
The FIAO Athens Day Resource Center, which is located at the corner of Maple and Pearl streets in northwest Athens, operates from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The center offers a safe place to use the Internet, take a shower, wash clothing, eat a warm meal, or get a coat or a blanket, along with toiletries and food items.
Several area businesses, organizations and individuals have already stepped up to the plate to help Faith in Action’s Athens Day Resource Center, Caswell said. Clothing is provided by Athens Thrift Store, while Baker Brothers and Randy Featherston donated plumbing services, including a hot water heater and finished-out shower and bathroom facilities. Acme Brick also has provided new industrial carpeting.
Malakoff Rotarians also brought donated items to Feb. 21’s meeting, including canned goods and Valentine’s Day candy. Further community service will come during Spring Break, when First Baptist Church of Athens’ will scrape, paint and perform other chores at the Athens Day Resource Center.

Feb

23

Posted by : admin | On : February 23, 2017

THE NEWS PHOTO/RUSSELL SLATON – Malakoff ISD school board secretary Tim Mattingly (left) receives, on behalf of board members, a framed proclamation from Superintendent Randy Perry (right) which thanks trustees for their service, passed in January by the Texas Legislature, and sponsored by Rep. John Wray. That presentation came Thursday, Feb. 16.

THE NEWS PHOTO/RUSSELL SLATON – Malakoff ISD school board secretary Tim Mattingly (left) receives, on behalf of board members, a framed proclamation from Superintendent Randy Perry (right) which thanks trustees for their service, passed in January by the Texas Legislature, and sponsored by Rep. John Wray. That presentation came Thursday, Feb. 16.


By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
MALAKOFF – Malakoff ISD trustees have approved all principal and director contracts for the 2017-18 school year, and also rewarded Superintendent Randy Perry with a two-percent raise. Those actions came during Feb. 16’s monthly meeting.
Superintendent Perry also presented board members a framed copy of a resolution sponsored by State Rep. John Wray, who serves Malakoff ISD in the Texas Legislature, which recognizes Malakoff school board members with a proclamation commending their service and “exemplary commitment to students.” That resolution, issued in conjunction with January’s Texas School Board Appreciation Month, was passed on the floor of the Texas House of Representatives in late January.
Perry also thanked Rep. Wray and State Sen. Robert Nichols later in the meeting, during his superintendent’s report, for co-sponsoring bills that have a direct effect on Malakoff ISD. Nichols’ co-sponsored bill would end the small-school penalty in the multiplier used to determine state school funding, applied against school districts smaller than 300 square miles. Perry said it is estimated that funding formula change could mean an extra $500,000 per year in state funding for Malakoff ISD.
Wray’s co-sponsored bill would continue state funding for another six years for Additional State Aid for Tax Reduction (ASATR), a funding program adopted in 2006 which fulfilled a Texas Legislature promise that no school district would receive less funding because of the reduction in property tax rates spearheaded by that same body. The funding percentage was subsequently reduced by state legislators in 2011.
Malakoff ISD board members also approved a grant application to provide partial funding for the district’s school resource officer position. The $40,000 matching grant, now known as an UPLIFT grant, was formerly known as COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services). The grant is administered by the U.S. Department of Education.
Superintendent Perry also discussed the district’s closing on Feb. 6 because of widespread illnesses in preceding days that he said led to attendance bottoming out at 83 percent. Perry said first, sixth and seventh grades were hit hardest by illness absences.
MISD board members also discussed board training held earlier this month, which all agreed helped them be better board members.

Feb

23

Posted by : admin | On : February 23, 2017

Special to The News
ATHENS–A Log Cabin man, suspected of murdering his wife, has been indicted.
Daniel Joesph Scott, 28, was indicted for the murder of Alicia Scott, 29, who was pronounced dead from a gunshot wound Dec. 28, 2016.
Formerly Alicia Weaver, she was a graduate of Kemp High School.
The accused is being held on a $3,500,000 bond. He is one of 43 indicted by the Henderson County Grand Jury Feb. 17 including 14 cases indicted under seal.
Others indicted by the grand jury include:
1. Aaron Sean Short, 28, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
2. Temple Andrew Gough, SR, 43, indicted for Injury to a Child
3. Arthur Edward Carpenter, 62, indicted for Aggravated Sexual Assault
4. Khomenique Latoia Thompson, 37, indicted for Assault
5. Shyanna Josey, 22, indicted for Prohibited Substance in Correctional Facility
6. Russell Glen Levescy, 57, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
7. Cody Glenn Sims, 18, indicted for Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicle
8.James Donelle Cumby, 33, indicted for Failure to Comply with Registration Requirements
9. Clinton Keith Holmes, 50, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
10. Brad Lee McCarty, 30, indicted for Burglary
11. Bobby Don Jackson, 24, indicted for Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
12. Jason Charles Rhea, 40, indicted for Failure to Comply with Registration Requirements
13. Lisa Michelle Goodwin, 32, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
14. John Grig Kincheloe, JR, 58, indicted for Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
15. Debra Sue Kincheloe, 54, indicted for Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
16. Austin Gustavo Mendoza, 26, indicted for Evading Arrest or Detention
17. Gentry Jomal Canady, 25, indicted for Theft
18. Justin William Deans, 36, indicted for Driving While Intoxicated
19. Ashley Michelle Kleinmann, 46, indicted for Bail Jumping and Failure to Appear
20. Troy Allen Alldredge, 46, indicted for Assault
21. Craig Steven Richardson, 43, indicted for Injury to Disabled Individual
22. Nicholas Francis Landi, JR, 25 indicted for Aggravated Assault
23. Amanda Gail Morgan, 35, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
24. Paul Alton Ely, JR, 49, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
25. Joseph Adam Parrott, 33, indicted for Unlawful Possession of Firearm
26. George Ramon Perez, 34, indicted for Unlawful Possession of Firearm
27. Traunjanique Chantel Rose, 19, indicted for Prohibited Substance in Correctional Facility
28. John Edwin Mitchell, 28, indicted for Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
29. Charles Thomas Lastowski, JR, 34, indicted for Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
30. Raymond Leo Clary III, 47, indicted for Assault
31. Corey Vance Johnson, 24, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
32. Michael Edward Sargent, 24, indicted for Assault
33. James Randolph Sockwell, II, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
34. Silvia Maryann Morris, 32, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
35. Benny Wayne Whatley, 42, indicted for Evading Arrest or Detention
36. Randall Gene Looney, 23, indicted for Aggravated Perjury
37. Kerry Wayne Clark, 55, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
38. Randy William Allen, 47, indicted for Possession of Controlled Substance
39. Richard Dean Garner, 22, indicted for Burglary
40. Robert Kenneth Chapman, 35, indicted for Evading Arrest or Detention and Manufacture or Delivery of Substance in Penalty Group One
41. Dylan Thomas Hoggett, 19, indicted for Prohibited Substance in Correctional Facility
42. Thomas Dalbert Hamilton, indicted for Aggravated Assault and Unlawful Possession of Firearm

Feb

16

Posted by : admin | On : February 16, 2017

The News Staff Reports
CORSICANA–Jalie Dawson was the hero the Malakoff needed after nailing shot in the closing seconds of the Lady Tigers 48-46 Bi-District playoff victory over Maypearl Feb. 13 at Navarro College.
The Lady Tigers fell behind in the contest early, as Maypearl jumped out to a 14-8 lead in the first quarter.
Maypearl kept adding to the lead early in the second quarter until two free throws from Dawson brought Malakoff to 24-16, with 4:21 remaining in the first half. The lead continued to crumble, then Dawson took Malakoff within one point, 24-23, with two more free throws with 2:05 remaining.
In the third quarter, the defensive pressure picked up for both teams as Maypearl outscored Malakoff, 7-5, for a 40-35 lead.
In the fourth quarter Maypearl led by as much as 42-37 before the Lady Tigers made their final comeback. Maypearl tied the game at 46 with under 30 seconds remaining, then Dawson nailed the game-winning shot.
Dawson led the way for Malakoff with a game-high 20 points.
Kamry Hurd had 12,  junior Charlsey Stearman had five, junior Nakeya Kelley had four and freshman Sha’Kera Thompson had two.
Maypearl had three points from Creech and Meredith Keasler and two from Alyssa Holder.
Malakoff (19-10 overall) will face the winner of the Little River Academy-Whitney contest later this week in the area round.

Feb

16

Posted by : admin | On : February 16, 2017

By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
STAR HARBOR–The Star Harbor City Council agreed to file for a grievance hearing with the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) through its attorney over new sewer rates the City of Malakoff is charging under new contract terms.
Star Harbor has been adamant in its rejection of the new contract and is developing plans to construct its own wastewater treatment plant. A committee formed for this purpose gave its report to the council on Monday. The council named Wasteline Engineering Inc. out of Aledo to be its design firm.
The January bill to Star Harbor has gone from $3,400 a month to $15,485. In addition, the council has agreed to continue to pay the City of Malakoff the customary amount and bank the rest in an escrow account. Councilman Duane Smith opposed the move.
One of the residents, who is a lawyer, pointed out that if Star Harbor pays the increased amount it could be construed as acceptance of the new contract.
Council member Warren Claxton told the council that under Chapter 13 of the Texas Water Code (TWC), the city could appeal to the PUC on the grounds the new rate is unfair, unreasonable and discriminatory. Claxton pointed out that it discriminates because Star Harbor’s rate doesn’t consider the community provides its own maintenance of sewer lines, reducing (I & I) water inflow (from storm water) and infiltration (from ground water). Thus, it is not being treated equally with other customers outside the city limits. Star Harbor charges each of its taps an additional $15 a month to maintain the lines.
“It’s unfair, too,” Claxton said pointing out the increase from $10.43 per sewer tap for first 1,000 gallons to base rate of $47.50 represents a 355.4 percent increase. The next 1,000-gallon increment costs $14.04. Extrapolated out to three and four thousand gallons a month demonstrated a 624 percent increase from $10.43 to $75.58 for 3,000 gallons; and a 759 percent increase from $10.43 to $89.53 for 4,000 gallons of wastewater. “Surely, they haven’t been taking our $10.43 a month per tap fee for the last two years at a loss?” queried city treasurer Don Ellis.
“At those rates, just over two years we would have enough to build our own sewer plant,” Councilman O.R. Perdue said.
Star Harbor produces its own water for residents. It sends a quarterly report to the City of Malakoff reporting the amount of water delivered to residents in Star Harbor, some of which have septic tanks. From this data, the city formulates the charge, divided among 326 taps comes to $10.43 a month for the past two years, or $3,400 to the city, plus a 1 percent administrative service charge.
“It’s incumbent upon Malakoff to come back to justify this rate increase,” Claxton said. Council members repeatedly wanted to know what it costs Malakoff to process a thousand gallons of wastewater. They also agreed the city was entitled to make a reasonable profit. After a lengthy discussion, the council approved the sending of a letter to the City of Malakoff, demanding it justify the new rate and be willing to negotiate with the City of Star Harbor on a new contract.
However, Star Harbor residents say there is a 10-year history of attempts to negotiate a new wastewater treatment contract before the former 30-year contract ran out without success. “In fact, Malakoff did not even present us with their original ‘new contract’ proposal until several months after the old contract expired,” Mayor Dr. Walter Bingham wrote in a letter sent to all residents. “Most recently, we have had our attorney directly involved in the negotiating attempt but Malakoff has rebuffed any counter proposal we have made other than an out clause after a 10-year lock and has notified us that the new rate will be used as the calculation of our sewage bill beginning Jan. 1, contract or no contract.”
In related business, the council approved the hire of four laborers to complete smoke testing on sewer connections with 192 homes to locate areas of I&I, so these can be corrected. “Last month, we tallied nearly 21,000 gallons of rain water we sent to the wastewater plant,” utility/golf maintenance director Tommy Posey said.
Resident Selwyn Wilson pointed out that Star Harbor residents need to continue the relationship they have had with the businesses and people of Malakoff. “We use the same grocery stores, banks, insurance professionals; I’m sure the citizens of Malakoff don’t know this is going on. We want to continue a cooperative relationship. We’re just asking for information.”