Aug

18

Posted by : admin | On : August 18, 2016

IMG_2130By Erik Walsh
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF-The Malakoff Lady Tigers emerged victorious in three sets over cross-lake rivals Eustace Lady Bulldogs in a Aug. 16 matchup in Malakoff.
The clean sweep by Malakoff was the only meeting of the two teams this season. The Lady Tigers won by scores of 25-19, 25-22 and 25-23.
In sub-varsity action, the Eustace freshman defeated Malakoff in two sets, 25-18, 25-15; and the Malakoff JV won in three sets, 25-23, 22-25 and 15-10.
Eustace jumped out to a 4-1 lead in game one before extending it to 11-8. The Lady Tigers fought back to take the lead 20-18 before securing the victory 25-23.
Malakoff never trailed in game two, jumping out to a 4-1 to begin the set. Eustace eventually tied it up 7-7, but the Lady Tigers reclaimed the lead and never surrendered it. Malakoff went up 15-12 before advancing the lead to 18-15, then 22-19. They won game two 25-22.
After the hard fought game both teams set their sights on the Eustace tournament this weekend. The Lady Bulldogs’ first game is August 18 at 8 a.m. against Blooming Grove. The loss drops Eustace’s record to 4-4.
The Lady Tigers open play in the Eustace tournament at 3 p.m. against Quinlan Boles. The win over Eustace gave Malakoff its first win of the season.

Aug

18

Posted by : admin | On : August 18, 2016

By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF—The Malakoff School board adopted a tax rate equal to the same one it adopted last year, totaling $1.20 per $100 worth of taxable property value. The new budget was also adopted Aug. 15 based on 1,308 students attending or about $13,015 per student totaling a budget of $17,024.101. Currently, 1,311 students are enrolled, with more expected in kindergarten.
A little more than two million dollars will service the district’s debt in 2016-17, as it did last year. That’s about $1,546 per student.
However, the majority of the funding per student will go toward instruction and instructional support, about $6,940 per student. District operations will absorb $2,037 per student. A total of seven other services and expenses totals $2,161 per student.
Trustees unanimously approved five items including the Student Code of Conduct, insurance for vehicle property and general liability, final budget amendments for 2015-16 school year, naming Smith, Lambright & Associates to audit the 2015-16 finances and a list of principals, assistant principals to appraise teachers’ effectiveness under the new rules.
Trustees also agreed for Henderson County to operate its November 8 school board election. The deadline to file candidacy at the administration building is Monday, Aug. 22.
Three board members are up for re-election. They are Gary Woolverton, Mike Monroe and Jerry Spiva, who has been filling a term vacated by Billy Sparks.
Superintendent Randy Perry presented nine goals for the year. Priority was given to seeing students improve their short answer writing abilities to meet the state’s rubric. He also sees the door of opportunity closing for the district to move toward becoming a District of Innovation. This category would give the district flexibility as do many charter schools. He means to begin the process in September and finish it by March. He also wants to see the district’s Special Education students experience greater success on the STAAR test. “We just have to do whatever we can to help these kids, who work so hard to achieve their maximum potential,” he said.
His goals also include incorporating more collaborations via Google Apps and Docs to host Google classrooms for greater creativity and more efficient and timely adjustments for forward momentum. Perry also wants to see more students considered college ready by the TEA upon graduation. Toward that end, he hopes to have more students taking the college entrance exams and increase parent participation in the college selection process.
Because half of being successful in learning requires being in class, Perry wants the attendance rate to continue at 96 percent or better for the year.
On a celebratory note, Perry said he’s looking forward to marking the second Blue Ribbon campus in the district in as many years, when the announcement becomes official that Tool Elementary School has made the cut.
And finally go on providing a safe and orderly environment for students and staff.
In other business, trustees:
• Set meeting dates for November, December and January to accommodate holidays in those months. The board will meet as follows: Monday, Nov. 14, Monday, Dec. 12 and Thursday, Jan. 19.
• Heard all campuses Met Standard and the Distinguished list was to be released Aug. 26.
• Reviewed Update 105.
• Accepted the SHAC Report.
• Heard Principal and staff reports and gratitude to the board for $50 checks each teacher received during this week’s convocation.
• Considered future agenda item to repair sidewalk by the athletic entrance.
• Noted rock was delivered by Precinct 1 County Commissioner Scotty Thomas and spread in the driveway to the Agricultural Barn.

Aug

11

Posted by : admin | On : August 11, 2016

Hensarling town hall 8-3
By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–More than 100 souls came out for a town hall meeting hosted by Congressman Jeb Hensarling Aug.3 at the Senior Center in Athens. Each audience member who wanted to comment or ask a question was given two minutes to present, after which the 5th District Congressman from Texas responded.
The meeting was prefaced with a prayer by local minister Mark Hall, who asked God’s forgiveness for America’s departure from its founding principles of truth, morality and justice and asked courage on behalf of local citizens to stand united against tyranny and injustice.
The first question taken asked why so many Republicans in national office talk down about Donald Trump. “Why is he regarded so poorly?”
“I have publicly endorsed him as the Republican nominee for president, even though he wasn’t my first choice,” Hensarling responded. “I don’t know how he would govern, but I do know how Hillary Clinton will, and I vehemently oppose all her major policies. We can’t allow another liberal to be named to the Supreme Court for a generation. Further, I know Mike Pence, well. He’s a true conservative leader of high moral character and integrity. It speaks volumes that Trump named him as his running mate. I have no problem endorsing Trump, but reserve the right to disagree with him from time to time.”
Most of the other questions and comments had similar responses, pointing out that a change in the White House will be able to solve a lot of the issues under discussion. Those included dissolving the Sanctuary City program, birth-right citizenship to children of illegals, entitlement programs that attract illegal immigrants, accepting immigration from enemy countries such as Syria and Iraq and requiring work from welfare recipients.
Commenting on the latest news, Hensarling said Congress would launch a full investigation into the $400 million payment from the administration to Iran and the subsequent return of three Americans being held in Iran. “The paying of ransom for hostages is against U.S. policy and hadn’t been approved by the House,” he said.
Someone asked why Congress and the president were not enforcing the McCarran–Walter Act of 1952, which was enacted over President Truman’s veto. Sponsor Sen. Pat McCarran (D-Nevada), in a speech on the Senate floor March 2,1953 defended the legislation with these words:
“I believe that this nation is the last hope of Western civilization and if this oasis of the world shall be overrun, perverted, contaminated or destroyed, then the last flickering light of humanity will be extinguished. I take no issue with those who would praise the contributions which have been made to our society by people of many races, of varied creeds and colors. … However, we have in the United States today hard-core, indigestible blocs which have not become integrated into the American way of life, but which, on the contrary are its deadly enemies. Today, as never before, untold millions are storming our gates for admission and those gates are cracking under the strain. The solution of the problems of Europe and Asia will not come through a transplanting of those problems en masse to the United States. … I do not intend to become prophetic, but if the enemies of this legislation succeed in riddling it to pieces, or in amending it beyond recognition, they will have contributed more to promote this nation’s downfall than any other group since we achieved our independence as a nation.”

Aug

04

Posted by : admin | On : August 4, 2016

noah bush
malakoff flags
By Ryan Moulds
The News Sports Writer
HENDERSON COUNTY–The helmets and pads came out again as Texas high school football teams began two-a-days on August 1. Several local teams around the lake are gearing up for the first game of the season August 26.
Malakoff
The Malakoff Tigers enter the season with more hype than any other team in the area. They are picked to win district 9-3A and are ranked number four in the state. The eight-team district is picked to finish with Malakoff in first place followed by Teague, Groesbeck, West, Palestine Westwood, Elkhart, Whitney and Eustace.
Everything starts with the quarterback for Malakoff. Judd Miller had 3,199 total yards and 46 touchdowns a season ago as a sophomore. He returns as a junior with more experience and with two big targets to throw to in QT Barker and Tyler Russell.
Jamie Driskell’s defense will be led by Dan’Yal Littleton, a fierce defensive end who can get after the quarterback. Other standouts on defense are Larry Coker, Zee Bailey, Caleb Adams and Breashawn Williams.
Malakoff has an explosive offensive that has a chance to be even better than they were last year. They have a defense to match up with anyone and should be able to make a deep playoff run. The Tigers have a legitimate shot to hold up a championship trophy at AT&T Stadium at the end of the year.
Malakoff went 10-2 last season and was knocked out of the playoffs by three-time defending State Champion Cameron Yoe by one point. The Tigers finished second in district behind Teague, who beat Malakoff 28-7 in their rain-soaked match-up. Malakoff returns 13 starters and the varsity roster will be bolstered by a JV squad that went 8-2 last season.
“We have to take things one game at a time,” Driskell said. “Having all the pre-season hype is great, but the games are won on the field not on paper, and we have to show up ready to compete every week if we want to accomplish our goal.”
Driskell also said that he hopes for a rematch with Cameron Yoe in the playoffs this season. “The loss still stings,” he said. “I don’t know if it will ever fully go away but if we get another chance I think that things would go differently this time around.”
Athens
The Athens Hornets are in district 8-4A. Athens will be led by Head Coach Paul Essary who is in his eighth year at the helm.
The biggest hump that the Hornets will need to overcome is replacing running back Logan Fuller who had over 6,000 career rushing yards and signed to play at Tyler Junior College. Maalik Hall will split time at running back with Jaqualyon Bowman, and they will try to make up for Fuller’s absence.
Xavius Fulton will make the switch from receiver to quarterback. He will be tasked to replace Brandon Boyd. Athens is hoping to run the pistol on offense this season.
Defensively, linebacker Noah Bush might be the best player for the Hornets. He had 120 tackles last year as a junior and has already been getting attention from division one colleges. Between Bush, Hall, Zach Carson and Taylor Carson, Athens might have the best linebacker core in the district.
The Hornets will have the talent they need to compete on defense. In order to make it into the playoffs in a district with two state ranked teams, they must find what it takes to keep up on offense.
Last season, Athens went 8-4 and lost in the second round of the playoffs to Kennedale. The Hornets finished second in the district behind Kaufman.
“It’s an exciting time for Hornet Nation,” Essary said. “We are working on building a tradition of winning and anything short of the playoffs isn’t acceptable. We lost a lot on offense, but younger guys are going to step up and play hard for us. I think the sky is the limit for our team.”
Cross Roads
The Cross Roads Bobcats will be playing in district 10-2A this season. They are picked to finish last. The six-team district is picked to finish in the order of Big Sandy, Kerens, Gladewater Union Grove, Cayuga, Hawkins and Cross Roads.
The Bobcats are under new leadership this season. Former Skidmore-Tynan assistant coach Michael Gain takes over for a team that has not made the playoffs since 2003.
Despite history not being on their side, it may finally be time for optimism. Cross Roads won three games last season and only has one team on their schedule that finished last year with a winning record. Gain has been working hard with the team and thinks that they have what it takes to have success.
Taylor McKenzie will take over as quarterback for the Bobcats and Tyler Johnson is a proven work horse at the running back position. Johnson was injured halfway through the season last year and hopes to stay healthy to lead Cross Roads to more victories.
If everyone can stay healthy and the players buy what coach Gain is selling them, Cross Roads could sneak into the playoffs in a weak district.
The Bobcats went 3-7 last season and looked strong early on, but they went 0-5 in district play to end the year.
“We have the pieces in place to make the playoffs,” Gain said. “I like what we have on offense and defense, and we are all working hard every day to end the 13-year playoff drought. I want to make every day an adventure, and I want to get better while we have fun working.”
Trinidad
The Trinidad Trojans are picked to finish last in district 15-1A. The four-team district is picked to finish in the order of Milford, Mount Calm, Oakwood and Trinidad. The top two teams make the playoffs.
Trinidad hired a new coach after Scott Hayes announced that he was leaving to take a coaching job at Rice High School June 29. James Massarelli will step in and try to guide the Trojans back to the playoffs.
Massarelli will have one of the most exciting players in the district at his disposal in receiver Jerry Bannister. Colby Snider is a proven quarterback and will make the coaching transition easier.
Other players to watch include Johnny Ayala, Eli Arnold, Talon Sims and Ronald Marcus. The toughest task will be to replace Javonte Hornbuckle and his 18 total touchdowns. No one player will be able to pick up the slack by himself but, collectively, it’s possible.
The district is very top heavy and Trinidad is a very experienced team. The Trojans have the chance to compete and play spoiler. Trinidad finished with a 3-7 record last year and was 0-3 in district.
The high school football season starts on August 26. Malakoff will take on Bullard at home, Athens will be on the road at Mexia, Cross Roads will take on Frost and Trinidad will play Campbell.
The News will release its fall sports preview August 25. It will have information on all the local football, volleyball and cross country teams.

Aug

04

Posted by : admin | On : August 4, 2016

Bailey Hefley
James Nelson Jr.
Jefferson Daugherty
Joe St. Clair
The News Staff Reports
HENDERSON COUNTY–Henderson County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested four people July 28 for various crimes, including illegal drug possession, outstanding warrants and evading arrest.
According to Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse, investigators arrested a 26-year-old Malakoff man at his home on Royall Blvd., where he was allegedly growing marijuana. “I’m proud of my team,” Hillhouse said. “A citizen complained about possible drug activity at a residence. Investigators Brad Beddingfield, Kay Langford and Josh Rickman followed up on that complaint and found Joe Eldon St. Clair to be in possession of marijuana.”
In a separate case, investigators Beddingfield, Langford and Rickman attempted to stop a vehicle in the Cherokee Shores subdivision. After a pursuit, they arrested two suspects. Bailey Marie Hefley, 26, of Gun Barrel City was arrested for evading arrest with a vehicle. Mabank resident James Noel Nelson, Jr., 30, was arrested for outstanding warrants for assault causing bodily injury.
After a traffic stop on Henderson County Road 2514, Patrol Sergeant Daniel Wright arrested Jefferson Daugherty for outstanding warrants for possession of a controlled substance, parole violation, bail jumping and misdemeanor theft.
“We search homes, stop vehicles, follow up on tips and confront suspects about illegal drugs every day and will continue to do so,” Sheriff Hillhouse said.

Jul

21

Posted by : admin | On : July 21, 2016

DSC_0013 July 14 mal lib
By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
MALAKOFF–The Red Waller Community Library of Malakoff hosted Miss B and her assistant Lauren, who showed off several animals during the library’s weekly summer reading program, held July 14 at Malakoff Community Center.
The animals shown included a kangaroo, a wallaby, a bearded dragon, a sugar glider and a tarantula.
The weekly program continues through July 28.

Jul

14

Posted by : admin | On : July 14, 2016

By Robyn Wheeler
News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF–Malakoff ISD Board of Trustees approved eight properties to be entered into the Henderson County Sheriff’s tax foreclosure sale at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 2 at the courthouse. Of the eight properties, one is located in Key Ranch, two in Beachwood Estates, one in Esquire Estates and one in Royal Oaks Subdivision. If all properties sell for the estimated value, allowing MISD to make 25 percent of the sales, the district stands to make more than $36,000.
In addition, trustees approved the contract extension with Dr. Pepper until 2022. The district will receive $1 for every case sold.
Superintendent Randy Perry has been assigned to the Texas Association of Community Schools and signed two MOU’s for Trinity Valley Community College dual credit courses for 2016-17.
Perry said the STAAR scores will not be in until August but will be discussed in detail at the Aug. 15 meeting.
In other news, trustees:
• Approved the Region VII and 12 contracts for the 2016-17 school year.
• Heard a budget meeting is set for 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8.
• Received an excess check of $3,994.58 from Linebarger Gogagn Blair and Sampson, LLP.
• Heard two letters were received. The first from the Texas Education Agency approving the MISD audit for 2015-16. The second, from Texas State Representative John Wray congratulating the district on the finishing the construction on the field house and concession stand.

Jun

09

Posted by : admin | On : June 9, 2016

hernan
By Sariah Kendall
The News Staff Reporter
MALAKOFF– Julia Armstrong presented two scholarships to Malakoff High School students Jonathan Hernandez and Madelaine Walker, who also is Malakoff’s 2016 valedictorian, on May 26.
Both Hernandez and Walker have distinct and ambitious career goals planned for their futures.
Walker will study Genetic Research and Treatment at Baylor University and Hernandez will attend Tarleton State to pursue a degree in Criminal Justice upon completing his advanced individual training at Ft. Lee, VA., for the Army National Guard.

May

26

Posted by : admin | On : May 26, 2016

rotary5.24

By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
MALAKOFF – Malakoff Rotarians met two critical care helicopter technicians from East Texas Medical Center’s (ETMC) Air Medical Services during Tuesday, May 24’s weekly luncheon meeting at the Flagg House.
Michael Lawyer is a chief flight nurse based out of Tyler, while air flight medic Brad Pace is based out of Athens. “They do a great service for the community,” said Mike Burns, Malakoff ISD Director of Curriculum and Classroom Technology, who served as May 24’s program chair.
Lawyer has been in Henderson County for about 23 years. First an emergency medical technician (EMT) then progressing to a paramedic, Lawyer in 2009 earned his nursing degree from Trinity Valley Community College (TVCC). Pace went to Tyler Junior College (TJC), is a former firefighter in Jacksonville and also has his peace officer’s license.
ETMC Air 1 has flown from Tyler since 1985, while the Athens base started in 2004, while the Mt. Pleasant base became operational in 2005. There’s a helipad next to the Malakoff Volunteer Fire Department building often utilized by ETMC helicopters.
ETMC Air 1 provides critical care comparable to an intensive care unit, including heart and stroke treatment, all available 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Air 1 has bases in Athens, Tyler and Mt. Pleasant that serve a swath of East Texas, ranging from the Red River to Trinity County, north of Houston. ETMC Air 1 flew Hurricane Katrina medical patients from Louisiana to Beaumont in 2005.
ETMC’s Air 1 program has a perfect safety record over the past 30-plus years, with a stable of three helicopters equipped with twin engines as backup in case on engine goes down. Each helicopter includes a nurse, medic and pilot. The ETMC helicopters also provide search-and-rescue services, at no cost to the community, including searches for missing children, stranded boaters and wayward elderly. In addition, hospital transfers are part of the program’s mission.
Many pilots have military backgrounds because of the rigorous flight-hour requirements to be eligible for ETMC Air 1. ETMC partners with Metro Aviation of Shreveport for maintenance and air-traffic services. “They are amazing mechanics and pilots,” Lawyer said.

May

05

Posted by : admin | On : May 5, 2016

By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
MALAKOFF–The Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in the former Soviet empire took place 30 years ago, Malakoff Rotarians learned May 3, leaving an eerie aftermath.
Rotary program chair Jeanie Seely said the nuclear reactor fire and explosion happened April 26, 1986. It is considered the worst in world history, with radiation spreading across a great deal of Eurasia. The facility was shoddily built, Seely said, and that, along with human error, contributed to the disaster.
The aftermath included placing a 36-ton concrete cover over the destroyed reactor, but that, too, is falling apart. Efforts are underway to replace it, funded by more than 30 nations. Thyroid cancer has been the main radiation-related cause of death.
The Chernobyl area is still off-limits, even though about 150 people moved back to the city within two years of the explosion. Dead trees and leaves that fell have not decayed in the three decades since the nuclear disaster. Animal life, instead of extinction, has instead adapted, Seely said.
Also during the Malakoff Rotary meeting, member Teri Caswell announced an AmeriCorps-affiliated program called “Food on the Move,” which will provide free meals to children ages 1-18 at Caney Creek Baptist Church in Log Cabin and Trinidad Methodist Church. CitySquare, North Texas’ largest AmeriCorps program, administers “Food on the Move.” The summer food program lasts from June 6 to Aug. 12 and will be held Mondays through Fridays. Times will be determined later this month. Call (903) 489-3500 or (903) 489-7500 for more information.
Rotary member Julie Armstrong told fellow Rotarians about a $5,000 grant for the Malakoff Education Foundation, which benefits the Malakoff school district, courtesy of Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative (TVEC).