Feb

15

Posted by : admin | On : February 15, 2018

Commissioners Ken Geeslin, Chuck McHam, SAR-Athens hapter president Bill Sekel, County Judge Richard Sanders, SAR member Charles Luna, Wade McKinney and Ken Hayes line up to sign the proclamation they unanimously agreed to Tuesday.

Commissioners Ken Geeslin, Chuck McHam, SAR-Athens hapter president Bill Sekel, County Judge Richard Sanders, SAR member Charles Luna, Wade McKinney and Ken Hayes line up to sign the proclamation they unanimously agreed to Tuesday.

Bill Sekel, president of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Athens Chapter presents a proclamation to Commissioners' Court celebrating Feb. 22, 2018 as the 28th anniversary of the birth of George Washington, the father of our country.

Bill Sekel, president of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Athens Chapter presents a proclamation to Commissioners’ Court celebrating Feb. 22, 2018 as the 28th anniversary of the birth of George Washington, the father of our country.


By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Those attending Henderson County Commissioners’ Court Tuesday witnessed Democracy in action as residents of County Road 4506 in Precinct 4 took turns presenting testimony during a public hearing Tuesday considering the closure of 210 feet of roadway.
Usually, no one affected by decisions under consideration attends Commissioners’ Court to speak during a public hearing, noted Judge Richard Sanders.
However, four citizens, armed with aerial maps, arguments about how the closure would effect trash pick-ups, school children riding the bus and mail delivery, the dimensions of a bus turnaround area through the “half acre” the property owner is trying to reclaim would take up most that space; and a property owner barely maintaining a nine-acre farm property with a farmhouse on which he pays annual taxes and electricity testified how the closure would cut him off from that property.
The five-year owner of the property, who requested the closure to enable a fence line and better use of what he described as a half-acre, also got his say before the Commissioners’ Court. When all had been heard in the public hearing scheduled for 9:25 a.m., commissioners closed the hearing to discuss and consider any motion proffered.
Precinct 4 Commissioner Ken Geeslin offered three points to consider in the case before the request to close “the last 210 feet of CR 4506” died for lack of a motion. Geeslin pointed out that mapping services whether made by the appraisal district or from online computer services are not without faults, lacking crucial information. Secondly, the continuance of CR 4506 beyond the 210 feet proposed for closure has not been maintained by the county for at least 20 years and is basically a sugar sand road, though parts still maintain some asphalt. By the county’s rules a road not maintained for longer than 10 years is considered abandoned. However, the county cannot leave any property owner landlocked. Lastly, Precinct 4 did something Geeslin said he hopes will become common place throughout the county. It posted a road sign informing local residents of the public hearing scheduled to consider the request for road closure.
After the meeting adjourned, Geeslin told The News that he told residents reaching out to him on the matter to come up with a plan and present their case to the court – which they did. Later, they came to realize that by the issue lacking a motion, they had won their case.
In other action, commissioners:
• proclaimed Feb. 22, 2018 President George Washington Day in commemoration of the 286th anniversary of his birth. SAR members noted it was his leadership during the eight-year Revolutionary War which ultimately won the nation’s independence from the most powerful country in the world; he resisted the efforts of those who sought to make him a king and instead used his influence and power as Continental Congress president to support the creation and adoption of the Constitution of the United States; was elected the first President of the United States, serving two four-year terms and became the exemplar of distinguished leadership for all future presidents and in recognition of his devotion, wisdom, brilliance, courage and vision, acknowledge his contribution and relevance of his life for the preservation of democracy in today’s complex world.
“He (George Washington) was instrumental in how we run our government today,” Sanders respinded.
• refunded requests for overpayment of taxes totaling $8,582.64. One of those requests came from a property owner who is conducting an “eco-lab study” on the flora and fauna on his property. “Our chief appraiser has worked to remove that as a loophole but has not had a whole lot of luck with it,” Sanders said. The added ag exemption on two lots inside Star Harbor is to be for a specific period of time, which the appraiser has flagged for removal at the proper time, he added.
• accepted tax resale deeds of two lots in Porters Bluff Estates in Precinct 2 that had already been approved by Eustace ISD.
• agreed to set a 35-mph speed limit on a one-mile portion of CR 4622, south of Athens off SH 19 near the intersection of Millrun, which is already set at 35 mph. “The signs will go up today,” Geeslin said for the benefit of the citizen who spoke for the measure during the public hearing.
• praised Sheriff Botie Hillhouse for passing a surprise Jail Standards inspection for the seventh time in a row.
• accepted certain replats in Precinct 2 in Thurman Estates and the Forest Glen Addition.
• paid bills totaling $12,208.40 in 2017 and $185,336.99 in 2018.

Feb

15

Posted by : admin | On : February 15, 2018

Roderick Young lightenedMatthew Risler lightened
The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–Two separate traffic stops Feb. 8 netted arrests of suspected drug dealers. Henderson County Sheriff’s deputies arrested a man in Athens after finding him in possession of 35 “white rocks” believed to be crack cocaine.
Investigators David Robertson and Raymond Yockey also discovered a large sum of cash when the suspect was arrested and charged with a first-degree felony.
Roderick Young, 47, was released the following day on a $10,000 bond.
A second arrest of a suspected dealer in methamphetamines was made in the Thunderbird Shores subdivision near Gun Barrel City Feb. 8. Matthew Risler, 31, was stopped in his vehicle.
Deputy Matthew Jistel found him with a crystal-like substance believed to be methamphetamines, a digital scale and several empty plastic baggies commonly used to distribute the drug.
Risler faces a second-degree felony charge for manufacturing and delivering under 4 grams for dealing the drugs. In addition, Michael Box, 37, also from the Gun Barrel City area, was arrested and charged with a third-degree felony for hindering the Risler arrest, who was already wanted on an outstanding warrant for a parole violation. He is currently being held without bond.

Feb

08

Posted by : admin | On : February 8, 2018

Chase Outlaw CMYK

Special to The News
ARLINGTON–The second PBR (Professional Bull Riders) Major of the 2018 season, the 25th PBR: Unleash the Beast, Winstar World Casino and Resort Iron Cowboy will take place at AT&T Stadium, the largest stadium in the National Football League and the home of the Dallas Cowboys, Feb. 24. It will be the ninth consecutive year that AT&T Stadium will host the event.
PBR Majors are the highest profile events on the Premier Series Tour. The special events present the stars of the PBR, bull riders and bulls, competing in unique formats that offer increased world standings points and prize money.
For one night only, the Top-40 stars of the “toughest sport on dirt” will tackle the world’s rankest bulls, striving to make the eight-second buzzer. If a rider stays on his bull for the required eight seconds, he continues to compete. If he gets bucked off, he is finished. The men will continue to ride until one cowboy prevails and is declared the Iron Cowboy.
The 2017 Iron Cowboy champion, Eduardo Aparecido and two-time Iron Cowboy champion Joao Ricardo Vieira, are expected to compete. They will be joined by several PBR World Champions including reigning World Champion Jess Lockwood, 2016 PBR World Champion Cooper Davis, two-time World Champion J.B. Mauney (2013, 2015), three-time World Champion Silvano Alves (2014, 2012, 2011) and 2008 World Champion Guilherme Marchi.
The Iron Cowboy will be the eighth event on the 2018 PBR 25th Anniversary Tour schedule. The first half of the season will consist of 17 stops, traveling to such cities as Chicago, N.Y., Anaheim, Ca. and Albuquerque, N.M. The season will culminate with the
PBR World Finals at Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena Nov. 7-11, when the 2018 PBR World Champion, the bull rider who earns the most world standings points during the season, will receive the coveted World Championship belt buckle and $1 million bonus.

Feb

08

Posted by : admin | On : February 8, 2018

Cheryl NormanRegina Jones

The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–Sheriff Botie Hillhouse closed a game room in the Malakoff area after a team of investigators and the District Attorney’s Office arrested two women Feb. 1.
Hillhouse said law enforcement suspected illegal activity was occurring at the Hippy Hut Game Room on State Highway 31 in Malakoff, and served a search warrant issued by 392nd District Court Judge Scott McKee.
“We are watching these particular businesses in the county with a close eye,” Hillhouse said. “And when we have the evidence needed, we will arrest the ones involved with illegal operations.”
The game room attendant Cheryl Norman, 48, and manager Regina Jones, 53, were charged with felony and misdemeanor charges, including: engaging in organized criminal activity, promotion of gambling, keeping a gambling place, possession of gambling devices and possession of gambling paraphernalia.
Norman also was charged with possession of a controlled substance – suspected methamphetamine.
Investigators seized the drugs, gaming equipment and a large amount of cash.
“We have shut down these gambling houses in the past, and I will continue to make sure these operators know they are not welcome in this county,” Sheriff Hillhouse said.

Feb

08

Posted by : admin | On : February 8, 2018

Mt. Providence Baptist Church youth from Athens sing praises to the Lord while on front row their Pastor Rev. Joe Harris  and Rev. Zachary Jackson gives them encouragement.

Mt. Providence Baptist Church youth from Athens sing praises to the Lord while on front
row their Pastor Rev. Joe Harris and Rev. Zachary Jackson gives them encouragement.


By Delanda S. Johnson
Special to The News
MALAKOFF–As February kicks off Black History Monthwith events, the Henderson County Black History Committee’s (HCBC) first event was held Sunday, Feb. 4 with its annual “We Love Our Youth” program.
The program was hosted by Pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in Malakoff Rev. Zachary Jackson.The National theme for Black History Month is “African Americans in times of war” with the HCBHC sub-theme: “If only.”
The program opened with Chauncey Hogg and HCBHC member Derryl Jackson setting the atmosphere for a spirit filled event.
Henderson County youth who participated were from Antioch Baptist Church of Malakoff, Mt. Providence Baptist Church of Athensand Darty’s Temple Church of God in Christ of Malakoff. All displayed their unique talents in serving the Lord.
The congregation prepared to hear the word from Rev. Reginald J. Houston, a man with many degrees, a man who is a licensed nurse and a Ft. Worth ISD school teacher, but most of all a man who loves to preach the word.
Rev. Houston was excited to be back in Malakoff. He said, “It has been many years since I’ve been here, but out of all the places that I’ve traveled from the West Coast to the East Coast, Malakoff is the only place that has ever given me a key to the city. When I go on other speaking engagements I never leave home without my key to the City of Malakoff.”
Rev. Houston appealed to the youth of Henderson County since is was Super Bowl Sunday with a theme “The Real Super Bowl” coming from John 13:1-10.
Rev. Houston expressed to the youth, “That in times like these people will only think of themselves, that they will live any kind of way, tell lies, go along to get along. No one will take time out to pray. Things are not what they used to be; man has substituted man-made interest for the love of the Lord. Praising God is not popular, testimony service is not testimony, but boloney. No one is concerned about teaching or preaching about the wages of sins is death. It’s all about the billions of dollars that we pay to watch the professional athletes, new stadiums, clothes, and we are not eager to help the homeless, feed the hungry, clothe the needy.
People will show love for material things, but today modern Christians are overlooking their responsibilities, to win souls for the Lord.”
“In John, this chapter and verse is all about Jesus being humble. For example, Colin Kaepernick, the controversy about him taking a knee; this was not the first time that this has happened; if you recall, Jesus is the first to take a knee to show a divine message by asking to wash Peter’s feet. As stated before, it’s Jesus being humble. The water was changed from regular water in a bowl to a Super Bowl. If you have just one touch from Jesus, you will never be the same again,” said Rev. Houston.

Feb

01

Posted by : admin | On : February 1, 2018

Sarah Nicole Henderson
The News Staff Reports
ATHENS–Sarah Nicole Henderson, the mother who stands accused of murdering her two young daughters, pleaded not guilty to all charges during her first court appearance last Friday in the 392nd District Court, under Judge Scott McKee. The Henderson County Grand Jury returned indictments against Henderson for multiple charges including two counts of Capital Murder of a child under ten years of age, Attempted Murder, and Assault on a Public Servant.
A District Court Judge set her bonds at one million each on the two capital cases along with $50,000 each on the other two.
Henderson was arrested on Nov. 2, 2017 at her home in Indian Oak Harbor Subdivision for the murder of her two young daughters, ages 5 and 7, by shooting them in the head with a firearm. It was also alleged that she attempted to shoot her husband as well, resulting in the attempted murder charge.
The Assault on a Public Servant arose two days later while Henderson was being held in the Henderson County Jail, where she is accused of striking a detention officer while he was attempting to release her from restraint.
Henderson is being represented by two attorneys, Steve Green and John Youngblood. Judge Scott McKee issued a gag order and gave the attorneys a trial management order which included a trial date and other dates pertinent to proceeding to trial.
If convicted of capital murder, Sarah Henderson could face life in prison without the possibility of parole or the death penalty. Henderson remains in the Henderson County Jail.

Feb

01

Posted by : admin | On : February 1, 2018

Lance Gooden
By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–A Republican candidates’ forum held at the Senior Center in Athens Monday drew a crowd of the party faithful to hear from filers for the March Primary Election. Early voting begins on Feb. 20 and the deadline to register to vote is Monday, Feb. 5.
Of the nine Republicans running for Congress to replace retiring Jeb Hensarling only Lance Gooden showed up to greet voters in U.S. Representative District 5. Gooden noted how very different the responses are in Dallas County on the subjects of “our rural values of gun rights, freedom from excessive taxation and banning sanctuary cities.”
“I will always have an open-door policy when I represent you in Washington, D.C.,” Gooden said. “Congressmen often get lost in D.C. That won’t happen when I’m in office,” he said, referring to their dis-attachment from the people they came to serve.
The other eight office seekers for District 5 in the House of Representatives are Bunni Pounds, Charles Lingerfelt, Dan Wood, Danny Campbell, David Williams, Sam Deen, Jason Wright and Kenneth Sheets, who were represented by their supporters with brochures and information.
Next up were candidates for the state house, including former officeholder Dr. Stuart Spitzer, retired Army colonel Earl Brunner, school board trustees Keith Bell and Ashley McKee.
Spitzer said his former experience at the State House and a career of holding people’s lives in his hands as a doctor qualifies him to analyze the state’s problems, diagnose the precise malfunction and develop a solution process to return the body politic to normal stasis. Brunner said his experience as both an intelligence officer and military aviator gives him the unique perspective to think and act decisively. Keith Bell said his years in public service on the board of Forney ISD, overseeing massive budgets and business acumen as an electric contractor make him the man to attack the inequities of school finance. As a Forney ISD Trustee and businessman: “I understand budgets and will make public education a priority of state spending.”
As an attorney, McKee pointed out that she represents others on a daily basis in hospitals, courtrooms, board rooms, school boards and when things are going south in a hurry. “I know where people are struggling and I’m really good at representing my clients.” She listed safety, closing down the border, public education and tax relief as the top issues the state faces and said they are all connected. “Every year, the money going toward public education becomes less and less. And with expected growth, these problems are going to get bigger, requiring critical thinking and people who problem-solve for a living and action,” she said. “I have the know-how, conviction and energy to get it done.”
Bell said he’s the one to make the state prioritize public education. Twenty years on the school board has given him a thorough understanding of school finance, he said. Secondly, he means to develop a workforce through public education that is ready to meet the needs of business. “As a businessman, I know more about what the job market needs in the way of skilled and educated work force, better than anyone,” he said. As part of the Texas License Safety Board, he told how in 2004 he became part of the process of getting a bill passed. “I have the experience to make it happen,” he said.
Brunner referred to the military acronym KISS in summing up his top issues will be those that increase the quality of life for all Texans, especially teachers, first responders and veterans. “When you provide more cashflow into the hands of public servants, it will have a positive effect in the economy,” he said.
Candidates for County Judge pitted experience against fresh approaches. Jeff Weinstein, a former assistant district attorney, businessman and law firm owner said Henderson County needs an Emergency Operations Center and upgrades for radio technology, especially for fire departments and mobile medical technicians. More needs to be done to decrease juvenile crime and drug use in the county, promising a 10 percent reduction his first year in office and a 25 percent reduction over the next four years with him at the helm – all without raising taxes, he said.
New father and 20-year county commissioner Wade McKinney addressed the need for better communications for first responders throughout the county as a challenge the East Texas Council of Governments had been working on through some failed attempts and announced a program is coming into Henderson County. He pointed out the many cost-saving steps the county has taken under his watch to get it to debt-free status today, while doubling the investment in the sheriff’s office from $5,000,000 to $10,000,000 over the last 12 years.
Weinstein presented facts from his bus tour about what bothers people in the county most. People are concerned about safety, want good paying jobs and high-speed internet, he said, noting that Trump lately announced he was going to make high speed internet available in rural America. “It’s like we’re listening to the same people,” he said.
All three candidates for McKinney’s Precinct 2 Commissioner seat weighed in. Josh Bardwell pointed to his 13 years working first under Commissioner Ronny Lawrence and then McKinney to spell out his expertise with road construction, its materials and the variables involved to get the best bang for the buck. David Conner, a licensed mechanic, said he’s built and maintained a few roads in his career and is experienced with the equipment needed to get the job done. Scott Tuley said his business experience and role on the Mabank ISD school board has prepared him to seek more grant funding for roads. As a distributor for the Dallas Morning News and a volunteer tanker driver for a local fire department, he said he knows some county roads are in really bad shape. “Everything I’ve been involved with, I’ve been a leader,” he said.
Conner stressed that as commissioner he would be open to everybody and would work with the sheriff to clean up crime in this area. He said he is also concerned for radio communications for first responders and would look to counties who have gone through these challenges to learn from their experience.
Bardwell said his priority is supporting law enforcement to fight illegal drug use, followed by keeping taxes low for a pay-as-we-go method and road improvements built on value and knowhow.
Precinct 5 Justice of the Peace Linda Brownlow and challenger Patrick Gresham agreed that listening to the common man who gets his “day in court” is the job of a justice of the peace and on the nature of the job being on-call 24-7 while keeping a 40-hour per week office hours. Gresham presented his long career in ministry working with both adults and youth as the best experience for doing the job. While Brownlow said doing the job is her qualification.
Brownlow said she has a very capable office manager to oversee the insurance agency she inherited from her father, not requiring time taken away from her duties as judge. Gresham said, if he were elected his church fully supports his stepping away from ministry to fulfill his duties.
Gresham says in his experience responding to unattended deaths will likely be the most difficult part of being judge. Seeing people in their very worst, neediest moments takes infinite patience and kindness. He feels his strongest qualifications are his patience and even temperament.
Brownlow said she finds arraignments the most difficult because she has their lives in her hands.
JP 2 Kevin Pollock said he shows respect to all parties which come before him and he follows the law. “But don’t take my word for it,” he said. “Ask anyone how it is in the JP2 court and you’ll get your answer.” His opponent former JP Dale Blaylock was not in attendance.
Lastly, Precinct 4 Commissioner Ken Geeslin, facing Kelly Harris, added his bits to round out the information about the county and the office, listing “Taxes, taxes and taxes” as the priorities with most voters. He pointed out that though the county collects the taxes on behalf of all the taxing entities, its portion is significant for its smallness comparatively. “The county picks off 48 cents per $100 of property value, of which 8.3 cents goes to maintaining the roads,” he said. “Wow!! Your commissioners sure are doing a hell of a good job to maintain roads on 8.3 cents, he said tongue-in-cheek. He compared that to the 12 cents taxpayers contribute to the community college and the lion’s share to local public schools.
He also said in Precinct 4 over the last seven years he’s been in office the country replaced one mile of culverts and 100 miles of roads were upgraded.
Geeslin listed eradicating drug use and child and elder abuse as a second priority of his campaign. He also touched upon economic development and infrastructure (radio/telecommunications). His background is in various areas of the telecommunications industry. That coupled with 22 years of military service; eight active in the U.S.A.F. and the rest with the CD and Texas Air National Guard “helps me find the devil in the details,” he said.
The Christian Life Center Church in Gun Barrel City is hosting a candidates’ meet and greet followed by an address by Rafael Cruz, father of Texas Senator Ted Cruz, starting at 6 p.m. and ending at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 6. The program is sponsored by Concerned Citizens in Christ.

Jan

18

Posted by : admin | On : January 18, 2018

Henderson County Black History Committee member Delanda Johnson lights the candles surrounding the photos of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Henderson County Black History Committee member Delanda Johnson lights the candles surrounding the photos of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.


By Delanda S. Johnson
Special to the News
MALAKOFF–This past three-day-weekend was dedicated to the memory and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King dreamed of equal rights for all African Americans and committed to making that dream come true.
His famous “I Have A Dream” speech at the March on Washington moved the nation that August day in 1963. His extraordinary words and deeds made an impact we can still feel today – 50 years after his passing.
Dr. King a man of peace, a man of vision, and a man with a dream was one of the many trailblazers who fought for that advancement of African Americans.
As Dr. King and his freedom fighters marched against racism and hate, time is repeating itself. We need to have a non-violent approach and let all of America know as the song says, “Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me around, going to keep on walking and keep on marching right up to freedom land.”
The first event to celebrate Dr. King’s holiday was held on Saturday night (Jan. 13) at Johnson Chapel A. M. E. Church in Malakoff. This event was a spirit filled gospel explosion, with singing groups and soloists from within Henderson County and Anderson County. The main attraction was gospel recording artist Chuck and the Guiding Clouds from Huntsville, who Blessed the audience with empowering and Holy Ghost filled songs.
The second event celebrating Dr. King was held Monday night (Jan. 15, the actual birthday of Dr. King) at New Hope Corinth C. M. E. Church in Malakoff.
The program opened with Bro. Derryl Jackson and Sis. Marilyn Marks greeting the congregation.
Henderson County Sheriff Botie Hillhouse spoke to the congregation on church security. He also stated that there would be a training session scheduled for 6:00 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12 at the Henderson County Sheriff office.
“In times like these we must learn how to protect ourselves even in a religious atmosphere. We must be aware of our surrounding and crime has no boundaries,” said Sheriff Hillhouse.
Rev. Keith Ray, Pastor of Johnson Chapel A. M. E. Church stirred the congregation with a powerful message “Never Be Ashamed To Take A Knee.” The message centered around that we, as the human race should never be afraid and to always pray.
Rev. Ray stated, “There is power when you pray. You can move mountains if you just get on your knees and pray. Dr. King was a man who believed in love, fairness and the right of all people. Dr. King walked the streets to help break the barrier of racism. Dr. King died trying to help us understand how important it is to love without boundaries.
Jesus said, “We should pray and not faint. We are a people who have survived through prayer, however, today we have stopped praying. We must stand against the Devil and prayer is power. We have forgotten that prayer changes things. Know that prayer will change any situation, all you need to do is just get down on your knees.
Dr. King prayed and his walk with Jesus was unmovable. Like Dr. King, we must realize that when we walk in Christ and pray, Jesus will hear and answer your prayer. For each one paid the ultimate price for a friend, Dr. King, his life for equality for all mankind and Jesus, His life is Eternal Life.”

Jan

18

Posted by : admin | On : January 18, 2018

Stephen Duane Roberts lightened
Special to The News
ATHENS–A Henderson County jury sentenced an Athens man to 60 years in the Texas Department of Corrections on Jan. 10. Stephen Duane Roberts, age 45, was arrested on Jan. 20, 2017 by the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Task Force.
District Attorney Mark Hall said, “The Henderson County Sheriff’s personnel that made the case and the attorneys who tried it for the State all did an excellent job. I think that the sentence handed down by the jury reveals a clear statement to offenders that we are tired of illegal drugs permeating our community and destroying lives in the process, and if two or more stints in the pen don’t bring about a change in behavior, then this will be the result.”
Investigator Josh Rickman of the Sheriff’s Office secured a search warrant for Roberts’ home on Williams Street in Athens. Upon execution, deputies found almost 20 grams of methamphetamine, cocaine, Xanax, ecstasyand other prescription pills. Roberts was arrested for Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver and was indicted by a Henderson County Grand Jury in March of last year.
In the trial that began on Tuesday, Jan. 9, Assistant District Attorneys Jessica Bargmann and Daniel Cox presented evidence and testimony from Investigator Rickman and other Henderson County Sheriff’s Deputies, as well as a woman that was on the premises when the warrant was executed.
She testified to having lived there with Roberts for the preceding six weeks, during which time she used drugs numerous times. She also testified that as many as 40 or 50 people a day would come by the residence to buy drugs.
After an hour and 20 minutes of deliberations, the jury found Roberts guilty. The trial, held before Judge Mark Calhoon of the 3rd District Court, then proceeded to the sentencing phase. Due to Roberts’ extensive criminal history, the sentencing ranged from 25 years to life imprisonment.
Roberts had two previous convictions for possession of drugs, one with intent to deliver, others included felon in possession of a firearm, unlawful carrying of a weapon, DWI, and assault, among other offenses. He was on parole for the felon in possession of a firearm charge when he was arrested for this offense.
In his closing argument to the jury, Assistant District Attorney Cox stated, “Prison will not rehabilitate this man. He has been to prison three times already and keeps committing crimes. The only way to stop him from committing crimes in the future is to sentence him to prison for a significant amount of time.”

Jan

04

Posted by : admin | On : January 4, 2018

Special to The News
ATHENS–District Attorney Mark Hall reports that the Henderson County Grand Jury for the July-December term 2017 returned the following indictments. In addition, 13 cases are indicted under seal.
• Robert Dwayne Marin, 40, Athens, Injury to a Child.
• Coy Rain Mize, 26, Snyder, Burglary of Habitation.
• Justin James Williams, 28, Athens, Evading Arrest or Detention.
• Jimmy Dewith Wrigley, 17, Athens, Injury to a Child.
• Nathan Craig Lambert, 45, Kemp, Aggravated Assault.
• James Wheeler Shelton, III, 47, Athens, Possession of Controlled Substance (PCS) and Tampering with Evidence.
• Debra Renee Slay, 31, Murchison, PCS.
• Jennie Lea Hydrick, 58, Mabank, PCS.
• Phillip Corey Stewart, 39, Chandler, Manufacture or Delivery of Controlled Substance and Unlawful Possession of Firearm by Felon.
• Jonathan Daniel McSween, 33, Malakoff, Evading Arrest or Detention.
• Brandy Lea Collum, 31, Malakoff, PCS.
• Darrell Wayne Cranfill, Jr,, 42, Eustace, Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicle.
• Keaton Alan Carner, 26, Chandler, PCS.
• David Lee James, 36, Chandler, PCS.
• Brett Allen Anderson, 20, Kaufman, Aggravated Sexual Assault.
• Lorenzo Demarkas Patton, 35, Athens, Bail Jumping and Failure to Appear and Manufacture or Delivery of Controlled Substance.
• Beatrice Kay Anderson, 52, Malakoff, Assault on Public Servant.
• Rodney Ricardo Greer, 41, Athens, PCS.
• Hunter Glenn Wilcox, 20, PCS.
• Steven Ray Stewart, 46, Eustace, Obstruction or Retaliation.
• Jeffrey Allen Nowlan, 27, Plano, PCS.
• Douglas Wayne Starkey, 53, Athens, Failure to Comply with Registration Requirements.
• Garret Sloan McDaniel, 23, Malakoff, Failure to Comply with Registration Requirements.
• Clifton Denean Dora, 58, Chandler, Burglary.
• James Michael McCraw, 36, Athens, Burglary.
• Jeremy Shaynee Meeks, 34, Gun Barrel City, Aggravated Assault and Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicle.
• Amy Elizabeth Correll, 41, Tyler, PCS.
• Jonathan Daniel McSween, 33, Malakoff, Assault.
• Christopher Michael Radford, 25, Jefferson, Cruelty to Animals.
• David Rolland Figueroa, 27, Athens, PCS.
• Justin Michael Markee, 33, Mabank, Arson.
• Jarodrick Sharrod Young, 19, Athens, Tampering with Evidence.
• Ransom Roc Simmons, 24, Kaufman, Evading Arrest or Detention.
• Reginal Mark Morgan, 30, Murchison, Abandoning/Endangering a Child.
• Anna Marie Dalton, 25, Log Cabin, Abandoning/Endangering a Child.
• Ryan Liam Buford, 19, Gun Barrel City, Illegal Dumping.
• Matthew Dale Gage, 17, Mabank,Illegal Dumping.
• Jamie Lamon Nelson, 26, Frankston, Evading Arrest or Detention and Continuous Violence Against the Family.
• Tierney Dawn Robison, 35, Forney, Burglary, 2 counts.
• Tonya Michelle Yates, 47, Tool, Illegal Dumping.
• Dylan Andrew Baker, 20, Chandler, Aggravated Assault, 2 counts.
• Arlie Dewight England, 50, Gun Barrel City, PCS.
• Anthony Dandar Williams, 45, Athens, Tampering with Evidence and Evading Arrest or Detention.
• Nathan Arron Villa, 25, Mexia, Evading Arrest or Detention.
• Joseph Lee Marshall Autrey, 49, Seven Points, Manufacture or Delivery of Controlled Substance and Unlawful Possession of Firearm.