Oct

12

Posted by : admin | On : October 12, 2017

Tres Winn
By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Athens City Councilman Tres Winn announced his resignation from the city council at the regular meeting Monday night. Winn, whose term is up in May 2018, told the council he is building a home outside the city limits and expects it to be finished Dec. 1.
Winn said that with so many important decisions facing the council, the new member should be on board sooner rather than later. He is expected to resign at the beginning of the next meeting, scheduled for Oct. 23. Council will have to name a replacement and elect a new mayor pro tem.
Councilwoman Toni Clay said on her Facebook page, “Not only is Tres Winn a boldly honest council member, he’s a lot of fun to sit next to at meetings. We both have the spiritual gifts of sarcasm, and he’s made me laugh at sessions that lasted longer than it took to have my first child. That’s a gift beyond counting. I’ll miss you up there, friend.”
The site plan approval for Triton Athens I, LLC was pulled from the consent agenda with Mayor Monte Montgomery declaring a conflict of interest and abstaining from the discussion and vote. The wall expected to be constructed between the development and the adjacent backyards was again discussed with several citizens weighing in.
Marci Warren spoke to the council, once again asking that the wall be in place before any construction begins so as not to lose the use of her backyard. Members of the council entered into a discussion about materials used, whether a masonry wall would hold up in the area reserved for water runoff. After comments by the developer, the council agreed to go with the recommendation of Athens Managing Director of Planning Barbara Holley, which was a masonry wall and not a hybrid. The Ordinance passed after clarifying that the wall would precede construction and that the developer would be responsible for upkeep.
In other business, council members:
• agreed to the appointment of Shannon Traxson to the Zoning Board of Adjustments
• granted a closure of the City Parking Lot and alley behind the Texan theater for the Oct. 27-28 wedding of Katie Love
• approved an Economic Feasibility Study for the Athens Municipal Airport
• granted a utility easement at 1317 S. Palestine St. for a new Dollar General Store
• re-allocated $85,000 in funds to the O.D. Baggett Park Project.

Sep

28

Posted by : admin | On : September 28, 2017

By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
TRINIDAD–A proposed children’s home to be housed at the former First Baptist Church of Trinidad faced pushback from speakers during the Trinidad City Council meeting on Sept. 26.
Hugh Roberts, along with his wife, Charlotte, and Matt Zimmer spoke to council members on behalf of “In His Hands Ministry,” then held an hour-long discussion. The children’s home issue first came up for council discussion in March 2015.
The ministry intends to obtain licensing from the state Child Protective Services (CPS) to house youth age 10 and under at the former church property on Lawrence Street, which Hugh Roberts said would need to be resurveyed and have required notices posted before opening.
The children’s home intends to send its kids to a local school district, preferably Trinidad, according to ministry speakers. But Charlotte Roberts said if community opposition dictated it, the children’s home would send its kids to Malakoff schools instead. Those at the children’s home would move through the state-certified Level 1 facility at 90-day intervals.
The 10,000-square foot former church facility already is zoned for such purposes and would need no approval from the city to move forward, ministry speakers said. Those proposing the children’s home do want to have community support, they added.
Mayor Pro Tem Kay Hernandez said the City of Trinidad has consulted with its attorney, who informed them that current zoning allows the children’s home on the property. “We (the council) can’t say yes or no, but the community can,” Hernandez said.
One community opinion came from Kenneth Carter, a former law enforcement officer. “We are not against the kids, they are just in the wrong town,” Carter said. Other concerns included strains on the Trinidad Police Department, other city services such as water, and the Trinidad school district.
The First Baptist Church property was sold by its former directors to Caney Creek Baptist Church, which in turn sold it to the ministry, Hugh Roberts said. Charlotte Roberts said the former First Baptist Church board of directors wanted the facility to house the children’s home.
Trinidad City Council took no action on the matter but urged further meetings with the community, including Trinidad ISD trustees.
In other action, Trinidad City Council approved Mick Coffman to the Trinidad Economic Development Corporation (EDC) board of directors and approved an audit of fiscal year ending (FYE) 2016, which Trinidad City Administrator Terri Newhouse said reflected city finances as “holding our own.”
The Trinidad council also approved the municipal tax rate and budget during an Aug. 29 special meeting. The tax rate for the 2017-2018 fiscal year is 49.8045 cents per $100 property valuation. The budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2017 and ending Sept. 30, 2018 totals about $1.2 million.
Council members also cancelled the municipal election that had been set for Nov. 7 because no one signed up to face council incumbents Chris Quinn and Beth Parker. The position of Trinidad mayor also was to be decided on Nov. 7, but that election was cancelled, too, for lack of suitors.
Mayor Pro Tem Kay Hernandez, who is up for election in 2018, has served as mayor since its former occupant, Larry Estes, resigned in Oct. 2016.

Sep

28

Posted by : admin | On : September 28, 2017

By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Athens City Council heard from concerned citizens on several topics at their Sept. 25 regular meeting.
The first issue to bring citizens to the podium was the request for site plan approval and specific use permit from Triton Athens I, LLC for retail, restaurant and office development at 1006, 1010 and 1012 E. Tyler Streets. After the public hearing held by the Planning and Zoning Board, the developer agreed to an 8-ft. tall masonry wall dividing the development from the neighbors backyards.
Several citizens with property bordering the development spoke in favor of continuing the wall, extended to cover a curved portion of green space designed for runoff. After some discussion regarding the feasibility of a masonry wall in an area that would be wet much of the time, several hybrid construction options were discussed including masonry and wood combinations or wrought iron and wood combinations with vegetation.
Marcy Warren spoke in favor of the wall being in place before construction begins so, “We don’t lose the use of our backyards through this whole process. I would also urge that the wall be aesthetically pleasing with vegetation to preserve the peaceful nature of the area.” Jim Kerlin spoke in favor of an attractive wall as well and one that would reduce light and noise. Citizens reiterated that the importance of the wall being extended is to prevent patrons from parking on Crestway and walking to the development. Council listened to the first reading of the ordinance after public comments were closed.
Other ordinances read included Planned Development District Standards change to reduce minimum size from three acres to one acre, a specific use permit for Regency Mobile Home Park to allow for RVs at the park, no more than 20 at a time and a change to the Code of Ordinances to provide time limits for trash receptacles to be at the curb, no sooner than the day before and no later than the day after. All items were in the first reading stage.
In a surprising turn of events, the disannexation of the 31.374 acres belonging to Tom Potthoff was pulled from the consent agenda for discussion and failed to pass. Councilman Tres Winn cited the inconsistency and basic unfairness of the decision to proceed with the disannexation of Potthoff’s 31.374 acres and the decision to not allow .26 acres of the Ray property to be disannexed. “Are we gonna pick and choose or are we going to be fair? To me, this is apples and apples and the only difference is the size of the apple.” Winn proposed a blanket decision for all the properties affected. Mayor Montgomery agreed saying, “If this thing comes back, I think we can look at it across the board.”
In other business, council members:
• heard the Uncle Fletch Davis Hamburger Festival was a huge success. Jeff Weinstein told the group that they sold out on spaces for vendors and would expand next year’s event which is already in the planning stage.
• heard the updates have been completed in Kiwanis Park, a joint venture between the Athens Kiwanis Club and the city and that the new equipment is “top notch.”
• remained deadlocked on authorizing the interim city manager to enter into an agreement with Gallagher Construction Company for Construction Management Services related to the Cain Center Project. At issue is the flat fee of 6.7 percent ($482,000).

Sep

14

Posted by : admin | On : September 14, 2017

Jeff Weinstein (right) holds a proclamation making Sept. 23, 2017 "Unlce Fletch Festival Day" in the city of Athens. Mayor Monte Montgomery (left) read the proclamation and the council approved execution of an agreement with TxDOT for closure of State Right-of-Way for the festival.

Jeff Weinstein (right) holds a proclamation making Sept. 23, 2017 “Unlce Fletch Festival Day” in the city of Athens. Mayor Monte Montgomery (left) read the proclamation and the council approved execution of an agreement with TxDOT for closure of State Right-of-Way for the festival.


By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–Disannexation of property around Lake Athens came before the city council once again at their Sept. 11 meeting. Landowner Tom Potthoff spoke briefly, thanking the council members and Fire Chief McQueary for consideration relating to the disannexation of his property, which the council voted in favor of initiating Aug. 14 in a 4-1 vote, with Councilwoman Toni Clay opposing the move. The first reading of the Ordinance took place at the meeting. The second reading is scheduled for September.
City Managing Director of Planning Barbara Holley presented a report to the council regarding the possible impact of disannexing property within the city limits, pointing out that the affected area could be as much as 106 acres total with some additional amount of the spillway acreage.
“Due to the changes in the legislation regarding annexation, it is less likely. Currently, our growth boundary is at 80 percent.” Holley also described a situation where a property owner on the outskirts of the city could possibly enjoy city services without paying city taxes.
“From a planning perspective, I don’t think disannexing is a good idea because we have a significantly contracted growth boundary at this point,” Holley said. She also informed the council that when disannexing property, there is a mandatory refund of all taxes paid on a property from the time it was annexed to the time it is disannexed. For the Potthoff property, the amount is around $400.
Mayor Monte Montgomery questioned the fiscal impact of not only the taxes, but the work it would take city staff to process requests if they begin coming in succession. Councilwoman Clay reiterated her opposition to disannexation, “For me it is not about tax revenue now. Our job is to have a vision for the future. I feel that 40, 50 or 100 years from now, we will have made the wrong decision by de-annexing this property, especially when it is so much more difficult to annex in the future.”
Mayor Montgomery said, “It will always be my stand that we should never go after tax money without providing services. If we annex property, water and sewer should be right behind it.”
The council then considered the request of James and Carolyn Ray to disannex 0.260 acres (F.M. Trimble, A-766). Stan Taylor spoke to the council in favor of granting the request as it will affect how the Ray’s build their new home. The proposed porch and firepit will be in the section of land currently within the city. The portion of the lot is 100 feet by 71 to 90 feet.
After discussion, the motion failed 3-2.
In other business, council members:
• Mayor Monte Montgomery read a proclamation making Sept. 23 “Uncle Fletch Festival Day.”
• Approved selection of Gallagher Construction Company, L for construction management services (Construction Manager as Advisor) for the Cain Center Project.

Sep

14

Posted by : admin | On : September 14, 2017

By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
MALAKOFF—Property owners in Malakoff will be paying a higher ad valorem tax in 2018. The Malakoff City Council adopted a tax rate of 55 cents per $100 property value. That’s an increase of 6 cents from the previous year. The council also adopted its 2017-18 fiscal budget with a proposed total revenue of $2,039,200, up from the 2016-17 budget of $1,709,700. The new budget estimates expenditures totaling $1,994,100, with a balance of $39,100 at year’s end.
The written ordinance given to The News states, “the taxes levied under this ordinance shall be due Oct. 1, 2017, and if not paid on or before Feb. 1, 2018 shall immediately become delinquent.”
Prominent in the new budget is $60,000 set aside for the fire department, which is being relaunched. Allocations for Police, Court and Street departments are about the same as last year’s budget, however there is a $63,000 increase in Administration. The increase is found in salaries and health insurance and in the Misc. line item that went up from $11,500 to $30,000.
The City of Malakoff plans to suspend wastewater service to the City of Star Harbor on Oct. 15, if the city does not pay the arrears in its billing. The Malakoff City Council approved a letter to be sent by its lawyer to Star Harbor during its Monday meeting, following an executive session.
Star Harbor has contended the new rates don’t apply because it did not enter into a service agreement with Malakoff and that its attempts to discuss a new service agreement with Malakoff have gone unheeded. In the meantime, Star Harbor opened an escrow account where the rate hike money has been accumulating and now totals $116,293.49.
The new rates went into effect, according to the City of Malakoff, on Jan. 1 and “it is now time to pay up, or else. Put that on the front page,” City Administrator Ann Barker told The News.
Council members also amended its building permit fee schedule to reflect more accurately the cost of mandated inspections on all new installations, which the city does through a third party. These include such things as swimming pools, fences, alarm systems, electrical/mechanical and red tag inspections. The minimums for such inspections is increasing from $25 to $100.
Though that may be bad news, the good news is starting mid-October those doing business with the city may pay online. The council agreed to contract with Heartland Payment Systems for three years for the service, which will appear on the city’s website by a red rectangle, which reads: Pay Your Bill Now. Those using the convenience will incur a 4 percent fee. City fees may also by paid by phone toll free, mailed or walked in.
In other business, council members:
• approved a monetary gift for the city’s 33 employees at the end of the year. No amount was specified.
• amended the Personnel Policy to add a furlough day for Tuesday, July 3, 1918.
• accepted a new contract with Tarrant Regional Water District for the purchase of raw water.

Aug

31

Posted by : admin | On : August 31, 2017

By Russell Slaton
The News Correspondent
TRINIDAD–Trinidad City Council members have voted to raise rates to rent the city-owned Community Center, then later amended the policy to exclude non-profits and schools from the fee.
Council members also have had multiple discussions about the 2017-18 fiscal year budget, which is being currently crafted for consideration.
The vote to raise the Community Center rental rate to $250 for Trinidad residents, and $400 for non-Trinidad residents, came during the special meeting Aug. 10. Both rates require no deposit, are good for a full day of use and were effective immediately.
Anyone on the calendar who has already been scheduled to rent will pay the previous price for rental, which was $75 per day with a $50 deposit, totaling $125. The deposit was refundable if the center was left clean, upon inspection by an authorized agent of the City of Trinidad.
Then during the Aug. 22 regular monthly meeting, members of the council decided to amend the rental policy to exclude non-profit organizations, including schools, from paying the required rental rate.
Free use of Trinidad Community Center depends on coordination with Trinidad City Administrator Terri Newhouse, according to the adopted motion. Examples of school use include school dances and senior dinners.
Also during that meeting, Trinidad council members approved renewing a Partnership Maintenance Agreement for SC200 controllers and sensors at the municipal water plant. In addition, Valerie Hamrick of the Trinidad Public Works Department told council members that the department has completed road patchwork on East Carpenter and East Lawrence streets, along with West Street.
The Public Works Department also has installed 20 miles per hour speed-limit signs, as well as “Keep Community Clean” signs, Hamrick added. Hamrick told council members that she believed the signs have had a positive impact on the amount of litter along roads.
Furthermore, Trinidad council members on Aug. 22 continued discussing the municipal budget, including purchases using water/sewer and general fund revenue. Members also reviewed parameters set for the Texas Municipal Retirement Program for the City of Trinidad, in relation to the budget.
How to pay for it all remains a question that could be answered during a special meeting tentatively set for Tuesday, Aug. 29 at 5:30 p.m. to adopt the city budget and associated tax rate. “With less coming in and more going around, it becomes a challenge,” said council member Roy Stanfield.

Aug

17

Posted by : admin | On : August 17, 2017

Hensarling Meeting
By Tom Chapman
The News Correspondent
ATHENS–Local citizens gathered Thursday for a town hall meeting with U.S. Congressman Jeb Hensarling (R).
After opening remarks and introduction by County Judge Sanders, Congressman Hensarling stated that he was honored to occupy the “citizen’s seat” and recognized that despite political or philosophical differences “our citizenship unites us.” He then talked about recent legislative actions in the U.S. House of Representatives. Hensarling informed constituents that the House had been busy, passing about 300 bills. He went on to say that “about 200 of them are sitting in the Senate awaiting action.”
After talking about challenges the country and Congressional District 5 are facing, including healthcare reform, actions on entitlements, fiduciary concerns he opened the floor for questions and comment.
Several citizens asked about healthcare reform, expressing frustrations that deductibles have risen along with costs. The congressman stated the house had been working on a reform bill which preserved choice in providers and made the healthcare exchanges more easily accessible.
Other citizens asked insightful questions about campaign finance, with the general consensus that the citizens thought there were potential conflicts of interest by Congress accepting monies from industries in which congressmen had regulatory oversight.
Congressman Hensarling has represented the 5th district since 2003 and currently chairs the House Financial Services Committee.

Jul

27

Posted by : admin | On : July 27, 2017

Rodriguez

Athens Police Chief Buddy Hill (from left) presents Life Saving Awards to Patrolman Jonathan Hutchison and Corporal Roger Keith for their bravery and outstanding sevice for rescuing a trapped resident from a multi-story structure fire June 28.

Athens Police Chief Buddy Hill (from left) presents Life Saving Awards to Patrolman Jonathan Hutchison and Corporal Roger Keith for their bravery and outstanding sevice for rescuing a trapped resident from a multi-story structure fire June 28.


By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
ATHENS–The Athens City Council accepted the resignation of City Manager Philip Rodriguez at the July 25 meeting.
Rodriguez, who has been city manager for about two years, leaves to take a city manager position in Brighton, Colo., his home state. During his tenure in Athens nearly $13 million of capital improvements have begun, including the Cain Center revamp and major work to the water system.
In his resignation letter, Rodriguez detailed accomplishments made and said, “We did all of this and more while establishing a truly impressive city staff that is one of the most capable group of professionals and public servants I have ever worked with.”
Although his resignation is effective Sept. 10, it was announced at the city council meeting that his responsibility for the City of Athens would end on Aug. 8. Rodriguez thanked council members and the city for the opportunity and said a special thanks in his letter to former mayor Jerry Don Vaught for his “consistent support and mentorship.”
Athens Chamber of Commerce President had high praise for Rodriguez. “In the time that I’ve been a part of the Athens community, first with Cain Center and now the chamber, Philip has been very supportive. He is someone I’ve enjoyed working with and I’m very thankful for his service to the Athens community and his part in helping to move things to a place where good things are happening all around.”
Councilman Ed McCain said, “Philip and his family are going home to Colorado. I am very happy for him and he has done a really great job. But I am positive and forward looking. This is a great opportunity for Athens to get even better.”
McCain told The News that Athens has a great city staff and the city is primed for a great next 10 years with projects that are well underway and will be completed in a fiscally responsible manner. He also stated the city has a great possibility for an interim city manager.
Two Athens police officers were presented Life Saving Awards for rescuing a trapped resident during an early-morning structure fire in a multi-story building June 28. Patrolman Jonathan Hutchison and Corporal Roger Keith were the first to arrive on the scene and once they ascertained that there was indeed a trapped resident, they went into action to rescue her. Chief Buddy Hill said, “Without regard to their own personal safety, they pushed past the flames, entered the burning structure, located the resident and removed her.” Both officers and the resident were treated for smoke inhalation but no lasting damage.
Athens Fire Chief John McQueary praised the officers for their extreme bravery in rescuing the woman. “Those flames put out 1,200 degrees of heat and without protective gear or specialized training, they went in. All they saw was a life that needed to be saved.”
When a citizen’s request for de-annexation of his property came before the council, much discussion ensued. This was not the first time this had been brought before the council and was denied in November, 2016. The issue concerns a 31-acre tract of land (Tract 4A Abstract 135 D Cherry Sur) which the property owner was not aware was within city limits as a Lake Athens property when he purchased it.
Property owner Tom Potthoff wishes to develop the land for four homes. The city provides no services to the acreage, some 40 miles outside the city. After presentations by Potthoff and Planning and Development, council members voiced differing opinions and the item was tabled.
In other business, council members:
• heard a resolution presented by Councilwoman Toni Clay honoring Richard “Dick” Dwelle for 63 years of outstanding service to the people of Athens. Dwelle was instrumental in founding the Henderson County United Way, Keep Athens Beautiful, the Athens Industrial Foundation, the Public Library Fund and the Civic Center and Park Fund, serving on several of their boards. Dwelle passed away in June.
• agreed to allow heavy vehicles in commercial property by special-use permit so a business selling new and used trucks may operate on US 175.

Jul

27

Posted by : admin | On : July 27, 2017

Log Cabin City Secretary Belynda Figueriedo (right) admiinisters oath of office to new City Councilperson Rodney Allen. Allen replaces Jennifer Williams who resigned.

Log Cabin City Secretary Belynda Figueriedo (right) admiinisters oath of office to new City Councilperson Rodney Allen. Allen replaces Jennifer Williams who resigned.


By Denise York
The News Staff Writer
LOG CABIN–Log Cabin City Council accepted the resignation of council member Jennifer Williams and appointed Rodney Allen to take her place at the regular meeting on July 20 at the Log Cabin City Municipal Building.
The council approved some important changes to the payment of water bills and court costs which take effect Sept. 1. Water bill payments will be accepted between the hours of 8 a.m. to noon Monday
through Thursday. The policy was also amended to no longer accept cash for payment of water or court bills. Payment may be made by check, money order or credit/debit card.
Councilperson Judy Bearden told the assembly “This will make it more efficient and save time for the office personnel.” When asked what would happen if someone brought in a payment after hours, she answered, “They can put it in the drop box and it will not affect the bill being late.” The group was told there would be no change in the service fee for using a credit card.
The change will be communicated to residents via signs on the Municipal Building, newsletter and a notice on the water bill.
The council also accepted a bid for repair of the water system in the amount of $19,890 from Cates Welding for repair of the 30,000-gallon ground storage tank with the stipulation that the bid expected next week is not lower. The Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) informed the city of the violation during a routine inspection and are allowing the city time to make the repair before charging for the violation. The council did not want to wait another month to take action since at this point, they were not being charged a penalty for non-compliance. The bid was the lower of two they had received.
In other business, council members:
• approved hiring Amberlea Commino as a part-time park attendant
• adopted the investment policy for small cities as their official investment policy. City Secretary Belynda Figueriedo informed the council that by state law, they must have an investment policy in place even if they don’t have money to invest.
• renewed the church lease for the current rate of $400 per month at a one-year term.

Jul

13

Posted by : admin | On : July 13, 2017

The News Photo/Pearl Cantrell Mayor Warren Claxton (right) presents a plaque of appreciation to Duane Smith, for his service on the city council.

The News Photo/Pearl Cantrell
Mayor Warren Claxton (right) presents a plaque of appreciation to Duane Smith, for his service on the city council.


By Pearl Cantrell
The News Staff Writer
STAR HARBOR—Star Harbor Mayor Warren Claxton told a full room of his fellow residents that the city’s filings before the Public Utility Commission had been dismissed. “A technicality in the form of the application caused the dismissal,” Claxton explained. Star Harbor has a different law firm handling its legal work now, he indicated after public comments. “Whoever was responsible for the application ought to have his feet held to the fire,” Rick Koziol said in closing public comments.
The city is in contention with the City of Malakoff over a sharp rise in the cost of wastewater treatment. Star Harbor produces its own drinking water and is moving forward on building its own wastewater treatment plant.
Former councilman O.R. Perdue presented the quarterly and semiannual report on water and wastewater expenditures. Since January, the city has paid its customary $3,400.41 monthly billing to the City of Malakoff and a much larger amount into an escrow account. The payments total $20,402.46 for wastewater treatment and $98,076.18 toward escrow, totaling $118,478.64 or a monthly payment of $19,746.44 for the community’s 420 residents as of the 2010 U.S. Census.
At the end of 2016, the City of Malakoff presented a new service contract to Star Harbor, representing a 600 percent-plus increase in service charges. The city has repeatedly asked for an explanation of the new charges, a meeting to discuss the new contract and has sent representatives to the City of Malakoff City Council meetings without gaining any response.
The City of Malakoff attorney Hank Skelton to date has not responded to The News queries on this matter, nor has any council member. Since January, Star Harbor has continued to pay the amount it was paying under the former service contract and deposited the balance in an escrow account. After listening to legal advice from a resident who has an active law practice, the council felt that paying according to the new contract would be tacit agreement with the new contract, so in lieu of that an escrow account was set up. It was hoped that the growing amount in escrow would induce the City of Malakoff to enter into a discussion with city officials.
In other business, the council:
• recognized the faithful service of Duane Smith, who most recently served as Mayor Pro-tem, filling in for Dr. Walter Bingham who had to step down due to health reasons. He has also served as a former mayor of the city and on the council for several terms. Smith was not returned to the council during the May 6 election. The council appointed Claxton mayor, since Bingham’s resignation came after the deadline for the May 6 ballot.
• amended Ordinance 165 to coincide with state law requiring slow-moving vehicles to exhibit a triangular caution placard on the rear. Golf carts being used primarily for transportation use will be required to carry the placard. Golf carts traveling strictly between home and the golf course for use on the course are exempt, along with carts kept strictly for use on the greens. Police Chief Todd Tanner explained the need for the amendment.
• discussed amending Ordinance 162 dealing with new construction in five areas, including landscaping, dumpster permit fee, signage, minimum square feet and short-term rentals. The council took a vote on each area separately after discussion and hearing extensive public comment and Building and Zoning Committee recommendations at the beginning of the meeting.
• tabled making changes to landscaping requirements, took no action to implement a dumpster permit, change the minimum building footage requirement of 1500 sq. ft. or change in signage rules, which now reads that only city signs may be posted on city property at the entrance of Star Harbor and other signs must be removed from private property within three days of the event and can’t go up more than three days before the event.
• on a 4-1 vote, approved short-term rental use of properties with the intent to set a workshop to regulate such use.
• heard four building permits were issued since the last meeting.
• recognized the work of resident Gay Morris in preparing the community newsletter which keeps residents apprised of local news and events.